Bike to the Izzy

Plastic for the shizzy. This bike right here is made of plastic, and it’s made for the city. Immediately I’ve got to tell you my favorite part – the frame is recycleable. That means that when your frame gets a bit banged up but your wheels are still ready to go, you’ve got only to turn it in to the store for a new one! Inexpensive, lovely greenery.

This bike, whose name is “Izzy,” incorporates 2 free standing locking systems, 3 dimensional illumination, and integrated rear suspension.

I’d question the basket up front for everyone, especially non-ladies, but outside that, I love the yellow accents, the wheels look amazing, and again, that recyclable body is most excellent.

Designer: Omer Sagiv & Uri Sadeh

Izzy plastic city bike by Omer Sagiv

izzy02

izzy01

31 Comments

  • silvia says:

    where I can buy it?

  • mif991 says:

    I am impressed by the aesthetics of this bike, its very attractive, but when I buy one I always think of the durability of it. If it is not going to be long lasting, sturdy with a smooth ride I wouldn’t buy it. What is the chain made out of? It looks thin.

  • design super perfect 😉

  • Spectr0l says:

    “….I’d question the basket up front for everyone, especially non-ladies…”

    Isn’t a ‘Non-lady” a man or have I missed something here?

    Rip Van Winkle

  • Pedro says:

    Since when did plastic become ecological ? Since when does designing a bike that wont last long become sustainable ? Since when do wheels last more then frames ? Since when it will be cheap to change a plastic frame ? And most important … since when does a plastic body like that hold without a tube structure underneath ? Please … can you at least really think about what you do .. instead of designing bull shit sustainable stuff that will never be sustainable !!!!

  • design super perfect 😉

  • ad says:

    agree with you 100% Pedro…Nice 3D work, but please do some research..!

  • tony maas says:

    This is what happens when students spend their entire education sitting at a computer screen. You can imagine all you like but will it work in the real world? Walk the streets and spend time looking closely at real bikes and see how they fare. They look this good a month max when bought new and they’re made of more resilient stuff than plastic. Also rigidity is potentially an issue here. A good frame needs to be stiff, I can’t see how that works with the materials you are suggesting.

  • Omer says:

    You can’t understand the hole project by these images.
    it has being approved by engineers .
    no need to be bitter…

    • kaywarner says:

      Tony Maas has a point – you need to think of the concept as a package – not just a picture. e.g. think about how a chain works, what it does and the transfer of energy – then ask yourself – is rubber a good idea for this?!!!

      • Omer says:

        ITS A BELT!THERE ARE ALREADY RUBBER BELTS FOR BICYCLE IN THE MARKET! AND IT CAN ALSO BE MADE OUT OF KEVLAR! ITS 16 MONTHS PROJECT…
        TAKE CARE…

      • Geoff says:

        Harley Davidson’s use belts, and they transfer energy just fine. Plus, don’t need adjusting as much as chains

        • kaywarner says:

          Geoff/Omer – I can fully see where you are coming from & your not wrong, but ‘is this the best option’ is the question. Agreed this is an engineering issue, of which i am one, so i’m a touch bias – but rubber belts would tend to slip in wet weather (unless they have teeth, in which case they will wear fast) and loose energy on the power side due to friction, also it would be quite wide. I don’t know – its your toy – but food for thought.

          • Jason says:

            Performance wise, rubber belts are more than adequate. Just about all modern cars use them for timing belts. They wont slip or wear easily if designed correctly, are easier to adjust and are quieter. Although chains are cheap, repairable, alterable and easier to change out.

            Actually, looking at the design I don’t see how it’s easy to change the belt.

            but for this type of bike, a belt is fine.

          • mif991 says:

            Hey Omer. Thanks for presenting this. There have been several good points made on your design that I am sure you will take into consideration. I can tell you are taking the critiques pretty well, so this is one way to learn…

  • Omer says:

    FORGOT THE ‘A’…

  • D says:

    anyhow, since when does plastic become sutainable? producing it .. will be harm the environment much more then a normal frame…If you say that it works I believe .. but in what way is it better then a normal bike ??? stop designing useless and products that will just be another product with no actual impact on the environment… The thing is .. dont say that something is sustainable when its not ..

  • tony maas says:

    Its not about being bitter, its just that I see a great deal of these ‘sexy’ designs and wonder if the engineering is up to it. Ok, you have approval on that front but as someone who rode a fixie for three years in central london, I know only too well the type of punishment a bike, any bike, takes in a day; slammed up against railings coated with anti flyer paint (extremely rough surface), hitting curb edges with pedals, generally slipping and sliding across roads for whatever reason. I find myself asking just how good this will look a couple months down the road. My trusty fixie is a basic steel track frame, easily re-sprayed when it starts looking a little rough, this however…?

  • silvia says:

    I don’t know about the belt but whereis the bell?

  • gutter says:

    Excellent AND functional design.

  • gutter says:

    Excellent AND functional design.

  • Lucy says:

    where can I buy the bike???

  • Lucy says:

    where can I buy the bike???

  • Fat Block says:

    best bike deiseng

Comments are closed.