Yet Another Traffic Light!

We’ve seen some really cool Traffic Lights Concepts and going to the list is the Mobius Strip Lamp. It’s a one-in-all installation that features vehicle signals, pedestrian signals and a street lamp. The main idea is to reduce the visual mish-mash of lights and get them composed into one neat strip. The signal values are standard, meaning green, yellow, and red light.

Mobius Strip Lamp is a Red Dot Concept Design Award winning entry.

Designer: Kisung Lee

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    56 Comments

    • Demian says:

      How come an awarded design fails the simple "don't rely on color alone" rule?
      Really, how come a designer obviates color blind people and safety on a traffic design?
      I really have no clue…
      Looks like today it's all about form, and nobody's really paying attention to function.

      • Raymond says:

        Really if you are colour blind you would do well AVOID (and i stress the avoid) driving a car. [necessity might arise but in case of accident its not right for someone to be able to go scot free just claiming there colour blindness made it difficult for them to judge the situation]

      • colour blindness doesn't mean being blind to every colour

      • Dennis says:

        I'm colour blind and have no trouble seeing the difference in colours with this design. In today's traffic lights it can be difficult to tell the difference with the warning light (sometimes it looks like red, sometimes like green). This design uses high contrast colours so it's easy to differentiate.

        • eastcoaster says:

          I know colorblind people who rely on the standard positioning of the lights to drive. They have no trouble driving (traffic lights are the *only* time they're required to differentiate colors), but this design would not work for them (regardless of how high-contrast the colors are).

      • yan says:

        scroll up and read yankodesign tag line

      • Rico says:

        If you actually look at the signs, they are not just color (unlike current lights). The red light has “S” for Stop, the pedestrian one has a countdown (and the usual glyphs I’d bet). If they put “S” for stop, there’s probably “G” for Go and C for caution or something.

        Looks like today it’s all about ranting without actually looking at what you’re complaining about.

        • Sean says:

          Looking at the _top_ picture, it is clear that the character on the red light, just like the character on the pedestrian light, is the number '5', and is a countdown, _not_ an 'S' for 'Stop'.

        • Johnny says:

          Rico, it's not an S, it's a 5 doofus. For both lights. The way you can tell is by looking at the 6 and 4 on each side of them. But how hilarious is it that you say something like that and then call everybody out for complaining without actually looking. Haha, you stay classy.

    • Demian says:

      How come an awarded design fails the simple “don't rely on color alone” rule?
      Really, how come a designer obviates color blind people and safety on a traffic design?
      I really have no clue…
      Looks like today it's all about form, and nobody's really paying attention to function.

      • Raymond says:

        Really if you are colour blind you would do well AVOID (and i stress the avoid) driving a car. [necessity might arise but in case of accident its not right for someone to be able to go scot free just claiming there colour blindness made it difficult for them to judge the situation]

      • colour blindness doesn't mean being blind to every colour

      • Dennis says:

        I'm colour blind and have no trouble seeing the difference in colours with this design. In today's traffic lights it can be difficult to tell the difference with the warning light (sometimes it looks like red, sometimes like green). This design uses high contrast colours so it's easy to differentiate.

        • eastcoaster says:

          I know colorblind people who rely on the standard positioning of the lights to drive. They have no trouble driving (traffic lights are the *only* time they're required to differentiate colors), but this design would not work for them (regardless of how high-contrast the colors are).

          • Myrtonos says:

            Fact is, they would likely be daltonisitis (red-blind or green-blind), so not just their ability to read traffic lights but their overall situation awareness would be affected as they are less able to sense colour contrast.
            The relation between top and stop and bottom and go is weak, especially if one has the up/down confusion.

            Dennis, I would think you might be green-weak, this design does work for anyone who can tell apart colours like red, yellow and green.

      • yan says:

        scroll up and read yankodesign tag line

    • nice design but this is not for colorblind people…

    • nice design but this is not for colorblind people…

    • thisguy says:

      The reason stoplights have three bulbs is for colorblind people to be able to determine color based on position.

    • thisguy says:

      The reason stoplights have three bulbs is for colorblind people to be able to determine color based on position.

      • Myrtonos says:

        Remeber that until recently, with the introduction of LED traffic lights, it was not feasible for one lens to display different coloured aspects, a different filter was needed and so you had three bulbs, each with a different filter. Also it is desirable fo the red light to be visible over a line of cars and as far back as possible.
        So tell me, why do give way rules around the world tend to give equal priority to nearly all vehicles, regardless of size, weight and maneuverability.

    • Habibies says:

      Nice but Not for Asian Countries :)

    • Habibies says:

      Nice but Not for Asian Countries :)

    • Jaedong says:

      Position is Good, nevertheless We could have used shapes to do that : green square allows you, orange triangle warns you and red circle stops you. Simple as that. Don’t you think?

    • Jaedong says:

      Position is Good, nevertheless We could have used shapes to do that : green square allows you, orange triangle warns you and red circle stops you. Simple as that. Don’t you think?

    • qiuyue says:

      why can’t be used in Asian countries?

    • Wackolas says:

      It is not a Mobius strip though…

    • Wackolas says:

      It is not a Mobius strip though…

    • ilk says:

      Great design. Very appealing. I hope to see it on the streets.

    • ilk says:

      Great design. Very appealing. I hope to see it on the streets.

    • Rico says:

      If you actually look at the signs, they are not just color (unlike current lights). The red light has “S” for Stop, the pedestrian one has a countdown (and the usual glyphs I’d bet). If they put “S” for stop, there’s probably “G” for Go and C for caution or something.

      Looks like today it’s all about ranting without actually looking at what you’re complaining about.

      • Sean says:

        Looking at the _top_ picture, it is clear that the character on the red light, just like the character on the pedestrian light, is the number '5', and is a countdown, _not_ an 'S' for 'Stop'.

      • Johnny says:

        Rico, it's not an S, it's a 5 doofus. For both lights. The way you can tell is by looking at the 6 and 4 on each side of them. But how hilarious is it that you say something like that and then call everybody out for complaining without actually looking. Haha, you stay classy.

    • YeJin says:

      good idea!

    • YeJin says:

      good idea!

    • rcko says:

      Not ADA compliant. Just like the stupid hourglass traffic light. Seriously: design within the constraints, otherwise you might as well go "design" a time machine. Then maybe write a fairy tale while you're at it.

    • rcko says:

      Not ADA compliant. Just like the stupid hourglass traffic light. Seriously: design within the constraints, otherwise you might as well go “design” a time machine. Then maybe write a fairy tale while you're at it.

    • Myrtonos says:

      If this is not ADA complient, how about New Zealand's rule of turning cars giving way to traffic going straight with give way to the right (far side) in all other situations? Left turing vehicles give way to those coming towards them turning right. There left turing drivers sometimes need to check in three different directions, for traffic coming towards them (and determining whether someone coming towards them is going straight or turing right), for cyclisits and pedestrians on their left and (depending on the road width) for straight ahead traffic behind them. This basically requires good visual acuity and peripheral vision.
      Additonally those turning right need to determine whether someone coming towards them is going straight or turning left, which does not simply mean checking whether they are signalling left, it also involves telling how early they are signalling left and whether and how soon they slow down. This requries good visual acuity and depth perception. On top if this, they need to judge the road width and see if there is straight ahead traffic behind the left turing vehicle, again visual accuity and depth percepiton are involved.

    • Tim says:

      Great design and if the display could be augmented with the letters R, Y, G, W and DW, on the either side of the array, it could pass the color blind test, as long everyone agreed on the letters as a standard.

    • Gerunds says:

      Driving isn’t really that dangerous for the color blind actually – if you have Deuteranopia or Tritanopia you can still easily tell the difference between red and green lights – plus they always appear in the same order, so there’s really no problem. Additionally most signs have symbols that are clear enough to be understood without color.

      Up to 10% of the population is color blind in some fashion, so it’s a bit ridiculous to rely just on color to portray something – it would be not only dangerous (as in this design, were color tells you when you walk vs. the “walk” symbol currently used most places) but irresponsible.

      When we design to the “lowest common detonator” (if you will), everyone wins. People originally protested sidewalk curbs when the US started to require them, but they’re not only helpful for wheelchairs, but anyone pushing a cart, luggage, etc. Everyone wins!

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