Massive Agricultural Urbanism

One of the biggest challenges in architecture is to create homes that provide more than just shelter. We’re on a slow march of strip mining our resources so the question is, can a home benefit the community and in turn, the environment? Agricultural Urbanism is a proposed residential project that combines thousand year old terrance farming with modern construction.

Each level has its own terrace where a number of crops can be grown privately and communally. Harvests can be shared and sold to supplement incomes. The irregular shape was designed to follow the way the sun moves across the sky to give plants the most amount of sunlight. The substrate not only provides ample grounds for farming, but a natural insulating layer keeping the entire building cool in the summers and warm in the winters. The benefits of vertical farming are two fold. Pests don’t like this kind of structure and runoff is minimized since the entire system is self regulated.

Designer: Greg Chung Whan Park

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Agricultural Urbanism by Greg Chung Whan Park

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30 Comments

  • brack says:

    is this a publically funded idea? or is this built with generous donors?

    a look into the future…
    selfish hogs come in and take more than their share of the public farming crop…now you have to hire security…now you need id badges to enter…now the tax burden becomes greater because the city will have to pay for all the extras the co-op can’t manage.

    designing for the public good must incorporate forward thinking with an understanding of how it will perform in the future. if the end result of this project is a greater burden on the populace then its not a good idea to start.

    it is very pretty to look at though.

    • Peter says:

      So you’re saying you wouldn’t want to see this project designed to help feed the community come to pass because you might have to pay for a security guard via your taxes?

      I see you have your priorities right….

      • brack says:

        Hi Peter,

        So you’re saying the only way to fund this is through taxes?

        I say its a great project…but let those who want to build these types of projects, fund these projects…it’s why I asked to begin with, is this a publically funded idea?

        A quicker way to feed the community would be for everyone concerned to purchase twice the amount of groceries and give half to those who need it.

        Again, I think this is a beautiful design, but during these times, projects like these might make us “feel” good about what we’re about to do, but there’s no long term thinking.

        • Peter says:

          I don’t quite get the “no long term thinking” in what you’re saying…its essentially based on stepped agriculture practices which have been used successfully for hundreds of years across the globe in hilly and mountainous regions…its not like it’ll be built…you’ll get one crop and then its done…it’ll provide a continuous growing opportunity, much as a stepped hillside would. The bonuses involved with this coming to the city are obvious…logistically, feeding the populous is a nightmare and a huge burden on the countryside for one, and greening your urban environment naturally helps air quality…

          Funding for such projects are probably best from a PPP (Public Private Partnership)…I guess time will tell…

          • brack says:

            No, no, no. :) Not long term thinking in how to utilize hillsides…they look like they have a handle on that. I’m talking about the long term effect on those who will be financially responsible for it. And that’s what bugs me.

            Projects are designed, so-called public support is obtained, public funding(taxpayer dollars) is appropriated for it, it gets built, but then in 20 years, little thought is given the project, funding dries up, etc, etc…

  • mif991 says:

    Interesting concept. But I am not sure that if it is a public area, people would not start stealing the veggies…creating family feuds. “Maaah John is stealing the tomatoes again!!!”

  • kps9727 says:

    Why couldn’t this idea be used by commercial farmers to improve the amount of crop grown per square acre?

  • Charlie Parks says:

    Time Magazine says Valcent’s Vertical Farming Technology one of the Top 50 Best Innovations of 2009: http://bit.ly/5zDIqh

    “I can’t think of any technology that addresses more urgent issues than Valcent’s vertical farming system”, says RFK Jr http://bit.ly/cPb00g

    Reuters Video features Valcent’s VertiCrop vertical farming system: http://bit.ly/a9p47W

  • Charlie Parks says:

    Vertical farming is here today. Google Valcent and VertiCrop and you’ll see it’s not all Sci-Fi fancy graphics but practical and profitable TODAY!

  • Janja Song says:

    John Prewer pioneered the design and operation of aeroponics plants growth systems in an experimental programme in the UK in the early/mid 1970s. He then continued his work in this area for NASA in the 1980s, having produced several modern versions of the aeroponics system since.
    …maybe just use what’s been there for a long time now?

  • spasmody says:

    nice project but does it possible to build that in the near future?

  • Steve says:

    I have to agree with Brack, this is nice in theory, but once you factor in the human element, you start to see where this could break down. People taking advantage of other's work, outsiders stealing produce, mismanagement or fraud. I don't want to come across as a troll, but aren't you guys seeing the old idea of collective farming that crashed in communist countries? I think Urban farming is a great idea, since some of the bigger cities are seeing more and more empty lots and buildings, but I also think they should be private enterprises.

    Of course, we may have a fundamental paradigm shift in our societal consciousness if climate change effects are as bad as some say they will be. That may make this a successful project.

  • Steve says:

    I have to agree with Brack, this is nice in theory, but once you factor in the human element, you start to see where this could break down. People taking advantage of other's work, outsiders stealing produce, mismanagement or fraud. I don't want to come across as a troll, but aren't you guys seeing the old idea of collective farming that crashed in communist countries? I think Urban farming is a great idea, since some of the bigger cities are seeing more and more empty lots and buildings, but I also think they should be private enterprises.

    Of course, we may have a fundamental paradigm shift in our societal consciousness if climate change effects are as bad as some say they will be. That may make this a successful project.

  • Farmers should accept technology and learn vertical farming so they could grow more crops per acre of their land.

  • Farmers should accept technology and learn vertical farming so they could grow more crops per acre of their land.

  • Richie Rich says:

    Nice looking concept and the way of the future…I think it would be wonderful to make them move to catch the light of the day as it progresses to gain maximum results?

    As for how it is managed, well there is no doubt a number of things to consider, but surely an equitable and fair distribution through a co-op of some sort would be able to be worked out…..mere details in the scheme of things!!

  • jean mujer says:

    we have this in Banawe, we call it the rice terraces “payo” of the Philippines.

  • Fervil says:

    Astounding article! Im really impressed to these pictures as well with the content to this article. The way of farming is really expanding and improving as always. Just like to this article that also tells us the better way of farming in organized way is really impressive. Great work to the author and designer!

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