Two Prongs of a Wall Socket

Sometimes trying to plug a cord into a wall socket is like an adult version of that children’s toy where you have to match the shapes up to get them to fit. No, it shouldn’t be difficult but imagine what it’s like for the disabled and vision impaired. Baek Kil Hyun’s solution is modifying the traditional prongs into two half-hemspheric rings. Theoretically, this makes it much easier to use and actually slightly resembles the universal power icon.

Designer: Baek Kil Hyun

20 Comments

  • mugabo says:

    Correction: “modifying the traditional prongs” should say “receptacle” or “socket,” as the prongs attached to the cord are unchanged.

    Also, providing a slight concave curve within the socket would help to guide the plug in more easily, as well (but not sure about the safety of the resulting gap, though).

  • mugabo says:

    Correction: “modifying the traditional prongs” should say “receptacle” or “socket,” as the prongs attached to the cord are unchanged.

    Also, providing a slight concave curve within the socket would help to guide the plug in more easily, as well (but not sure about the safety of the resulting gap, though).

  • Jason gretie says:

    So dangerous..

  • Jason gretie says:

    So dangerous..

  • Gary says:

    There would be no way of knowing which leg of the recepticle is the hot (live) leg. That is why the prongs are different. This would create the potential of something like theexterior of an a metal lamp being electricaly live even when the lamp was swiched off.

  • Thijs says:

    It would be better just to make a guide groove instead of a larger hole. Not only because of safety, but also as it would require a minimal change in production. Current designs use two pieces of metal clamping the leg of the plug. Making the entire hole larger would require a lot more metal and a whole new design.
    Just help guide the plug to the right position would improve the design a lot.

  • Daniel says:

    Wouldn't two concentric circles be even easier? And if you don't want it to rotate, two concentric squares. Maybe I should become a designer…

  • Daniel says:

    Wouldn't two concentric circles be even easier? And if you don't want it to rotate, two concentric squares. Maybe I should become a designer…

  • @katuroo says:

    how would you fit a 3 prong cord?

  • @katuroo says:

    how would you fit a 3 prong cord?

  • Bauski says:

    in Europe you don't have them

  • zzz says:

    Not new design.

  • zzz says:

    Not new design.

  • Fred says:

    Can't be universal because we use different voltage around the world. In US 110V in Europe 220/230V. So what happens if you plug in your device made for 110V into a 220/230V plug?

  • Fred says:

    Can't be universal because we use different voltage around the world. In US 110V in Europe 220/230V. So what happens if you plug in your device made for 110V into a 220/230V plug?

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