Perfect Geometric Ice Cubes

The Lékué ice cube tray creates perfect cubes of ice every time. Inspired by an industrial moulding technique, the cubes are formed at an angle to avoid the need to taper any of the faces. And here I thought ice cube trays couldn’t really evolve to improve any further. These remind me of the cubes used in TRON Legacy. Ice is so beautiful when cut to strict proportionate geometry.

Materials: Polypropylene

Designer: DesignWright for Lékué

23 Comments

  • @upioneer says:

    someone enlighten me how the top of the "cubes" wouldnt be flat? or somehow does this product defy gravity?

  • @upioneer says:

    someone enlighten me how the top of the “cubes” wouldnt be flat? or somehow does this product defy gravity?

  • Blank says:

    I think whats happening here is the cavity is recessed so that the highest point of the cube is below water when filled. So when you push down with the mating half and fasten it in place excess water spills over the sides. I could see this being really tricky to do though since you would have to do all of this in one fluid motion – push down quickly, then fasten halves together instantaneously. Just not worth it if you ask me.

  • Blank says:

    I think whats happening here is the cavity is recessed so that the highest point of the cube is below water when filled. So when you push down with the mating half and fasten it in place excess water spills over the sides. I could see this being really tricky to do though since you would have to do all of this in one fluid motion – push down quickly, then fasten halves together instantaneously. Just not worth it if you ask me.

  • Mike Barnard says:

    To expand on Blank's comment, if you look closely you can see small holes in the tips of the top cubes. Water will flow out of those as the top is gently submerged until the entire angled cube is filled. Then a quick tilt will pour water out of the top leaving filled angled cubes behind. It actually makes one aspect of filling ice cube trays easier in that you just pour lots of water in, put the top on and pour off the excess.

    Very neat, very nicely resolved design technically. However, I'm not sure how many people care about exactly square ice cubes or would even notice. As this same approach could be used to accommodate any shape that can be applied to a simple dual mold (top and bottom), you could imagine bunny rabbits, turtles, dodecahedrons, shells, etc. That's probably where you'll see more penetration.

    Cheers,
    Mike

    Cheers,
    Mike

  • Mike Barnard says:

    To expand on Blank's comment, if you look closely you can see small holes in the tips of the top cubes. Water will flow out of those as the top is gently submerged until the entire angled cube is filled. Then a quick tilt will pour water out of the top leaving filled angled cubes behind. It actually makes one aspect of filling ice cube trays easier in that you just pour lots of water in, put the top on and pour off the excess.

    Very neat, very nicely resolved design technically. However, I'm not sure how many people care about exactly square ice cubes or would even notice. As this same approach could be used to accommodate any shape that can be applied to a simple dual mold (top and bottom), you could imagine bunny rabbits, turtles, dodecahedrons, shells, etc. That's probably where you'll see more penetration.

    Cheers,
    Mike

    Cheers,
    Mike

  • Mike Barnard says:

    To expand on Blank's comment, if you look closely you can see small holes in the tips of the top cubes. Water will flow out of those as the top is gently submerged until the entire angled cube is filled. Then a quick tilt will pour water out of the top leaving filled angled cubes behind. It actually makes one aspect of filling ice cube trays easier in that you just pour lots of water in, put the top on and pour off the excess.

    Very neat, very nicely resolved design technically. However, I'm not sure how many people care about exactly square ice cubes or would even notice. As this same approach could be used to accommodate any shape that can be applied to a simple dual mold (top and bottom), you could imagine bunny rabbits, turtles, dodecahedrons, shells, etc. That's probably where you'll see more penetration.

    Cheers,
    Mike

    Cheers,
    Mike

  • How about showing some photographs of the ice cubes outside of the mould in a glass or in a bowl so we can actually see what the end product looks like.

  • How about showing some photographs of the ice cubes outside of the mould in a glass or in a bowl so we can actually see what the end product looks like.

  • I used to do that for punch with a wreath mold (kept the punch cold for hours and looked so pretty!!)

    The boiling the water first is key – makes for crystal clear ice. After the mold begins to freeze a bit, I put maraschino cherries in it – then let it freeze solid. So festive!

  • I used to do that for punch with a wreath mold (kept the punch cold for hours and looked so pretty!!)

    The boiling the water first is key – makes for crystal clear ice. After the mold begins to freeze a bit, I put maraschino cherries in it – then let it freeze solid. So festive!

  • TOPRICE.IE says:

    nice i like different shapes of ice cubes and those are realy nice :d

  • TOPRICE.IE says:

    nice i like different shapes of ice cubes and those are realy nice :d

  • Ola Nystedt says:

    nice one guys!

  • Ola Nystedt says:

    nice one guys!

  • Thanks for the comments! I love all the technical chat about how it works, what the holes are for, etc. I’ll do my best to explain…..

    You fill the bottom tray with water up to a line and snap-fit the two trays together. The action of closing it causes the water to rise up inside the peaks of each cube (the holes allow this), leaving each cubic void about 91% full of water and self-leveled. During freezing, the water expands to fill the remaining space (the second reason for the holes) to leave a complete cube. Any excess water can overflow through the holes (i.e. in case of overfilling). When you click open the trays, the cubes all release and drop into the bottom tray, so no struggling to serve them. That’s it really, a simple, fun, easy to use product for making lovely ice cubes…..

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