Wind Powered Auto by the Shore

So you’re sitting there, trying to think of ways to power cars, and you think “hmmm, I wonder if I could make a car that’s powered by air?” That’s silly! You think, gosh, it’d work if only there were a constant source of wind. Right? Well hold on there, maybe if you shore up your thinking a little bit, so to speak, and place this car in only one specific location: the line of land near the ocean, from whens the wind almost continuously blows. How about that?

The following project is called “Kazaguruma” – it’s a wind force mobility project which employs the wind using an automobile that can utilize it in an extraordinary way. Air resistance and dynamic lift make this car go quite speedily. And it works! It’s tested on a small scale, you can see it in the video below.

This all has to do with the Magnus effect. In a nutshell, it has to do with the spinning of fan in the back creating a whirlwind effect, and that force resulting in the forward motion of the entire vehicle.

The Kazaguruma – Wind Force Mobility is an entry for the James Dyson Awards.
The James Dyson Award is an international design award that celebrates, encourages and inspires the next generation of design engineers.

Designer: Ippei Iwahara

12 Comments

  • mif991 says:

    I checked your video Mr. Iwahara and it is well done. It looks like you learned a bit from Dyson engineering for which I give you props. I don't know if your design will work in real life, but it should give you good knowledge on wind power. I actually liked your prop frame more than your presentation model….. now if this was an electrical/wind hybrid powered vehicle I think it could be more than a toy, as long as you rethink the tires.

  • mif991 says:

    I checked your video Mr. Iwahara and it is well done. It looks like you learned a bit from Dyson engineering for which I give you props. I don't know if your design will work in real life, but it should give you good knowledge on wind power. I actually liked your prop frame more than your presentation model….. now if this was an electrical/wind hybrid powered vehicle I think it could be more than a toy, as long as you rethink the tires.

  • vogelcube says:

    A neat concept, but there's not much change between this and a longboard with a windsail. Besides a seat, of course.

    It could be done, in high-wind environments with few buildings, cliffs, trees or other things that would block the flow of wind by any means. I'm also confused about the method of energy transference… Direct connections using a typical gearbox would be very energy-ineffecient, and also make the vehicle completely useless when the wind dies. Drive by wire would be better, having the fan connect to a generator to a battery, which then connects to 4 individual electric motors for the wheels… however, that'd be much heavier, although it would allow drivers to continue driving after the wind dies down.

  • vogelcube says:

    A neat concept, but there's not much change between this and a longboard with a windsail. Besides a seat, of course.

    It could be done, in high-wind environments with few buildings, cliffs, trees or other things that would block the flow of wind by any means. I'm also confused about the method of energy transference… Direct connections using a typical gearbox would be very energy-ineffecient, and also make the vehicle completely useless when the wind dies. Drive by wire would be better, having the fan connect to a generator to a battery, which then connects to 4 individual electric motors for the wheels… however, that'd be much heavier, although it would allow drivers to continue driving after the wind dies down.

  • sentine says:

    I agree with Vogelcube, although this is a neat idea there's the issue of weight to power. It's a long way between being a cool sports concept and being a relevant option for transport, comfort and security, not to mention being stuck without wind would add enough weight to make the power source insufficient.

  • sentine says:

    I agree with Vogelcube, although this is a neat idea there's the issue of weight to power. It's a long way between being a cool sports concept and being a relevant option for transport, comfort and security, not to mention being stuck without wind would add enough weight to make the power source insufficient.

  • Lukas says:

    i also agree with Vogelcube, although adding multiple wind turbines to a single generator might be in better prospect. im curious also about the idea of the wing creating lift. how, unless it is standalone dynamic (with no power needed) in producing the essential lift-creating curve, would it produce lift on both sides?

  • Lukas says:

    i also agree with Vogelcube, although adding multiple wind turbines to a single generator might be in better prospect. im curious also about the idea of the wing creating lift. how, unless it is standalone dynamic (with no power needed) in producing the essential lift-creating curve, would it produce lift on both sides?

Comments are closed.