Wall Plugs No Frills

These plugs are circular. Holy goodness it is a complete revolution in interior decorating. It’s another step back from decoration, that’s what it is. It’s the pushing back of details, creating a simpler, more chi-flowing world. Isn’t it? Take a vast look at these terrifically simplistic plug-ins and wonder to yourself how you ever lived without their elegant plugness (or lack thereof.)

Life isn’t all tiny electronic details, is it? It is when you become a home refurbisher, like my auntie Ginny and auntie Pat. They get down to details when they tear a whole house’s insides down and put them back up. They’re interested in these little things, severely. It’s these little tiny things that are “selling points” on a house. Even something so simple as a plug can sell a house in the head of the buyer.

And check it out: me, speaking as a designer who has also installed his fair share of wall plugs, says thusly: these work. They’d be fantastic to use in a new house and holy crap I want them.

Designer: Omer Arbel

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Wall Plug Concept by Omer Arbel

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12 Comments

  • Now just stop making plugs look like mini-spaceships and we’re good to go.

  • RP says:

    not a new idea (but good one nevertheless)

    http://www.mysterious.be

  • HJA says:

    Nice – But, may be a code violation if the plug doesn’t allow enough access to the pigtail splices in the box behind. Might work if a larger plate were flushed out with the wall without obvious fasteners.

  • Jose Gaona says:

    I first saw these plugs presneted at ICFF last year, its the exact same design from BOCCI (www.bocci.ca) i don´t know who made it first but i’ve already saw them.

  • I totally understand!

  • Erik says:

    Likely result in a code violation unless installed properly. The wires must be enclosed in a box or raceway in the wall, but also accessible for maintenance or repair. What this would require is ensuring the connecting wires or "Pigtails" were long enough to be pulled out of the socket, assuming the socket can even be removed from the finished/wall-side. The safety hazard comes when pulling on the outlet socket to remove/replace it; essentially pulling on joined wires with their wirenuts and trying to fit them through the wall-plate without them disconnecting. With a normal outlet, the wallplate and outlet both come out, allowing access to the full interior of the box. I can foresee plenty of hang-ups during maintenance on this device, no matter how nifty it looks. If the electrician before me cuts the line-side wires too short and/or fails to join the wires properly (very common instance) and something comes loose, you suddenly have to cut access to the box so you can make repairs. A simple outlet exchange suddenly requires a tap & float of the drywall and a new paint-job. Its a pretty concept, but impractical and potentially dangerous in the long-run.

  • Erik says:

    Likely result in a code violation unless installed properly. The wires must be enclosed in a box or raceway in the wall, but also accessible for maintenance or repair. What this would require is ensuring the connecting wires or “Pigtails” were long enough to be pulled out of the socket, assuming the socket can even be removed from the finished/wall-side. The safety hazard comes when pulling on the outlet socket to remove/replace it; essentially pulling on joined wires with their wirenuts and trying to fit them through the wall-plate without them disconnecting. With a normal outlet, the wallplate and outlet both come out, allowing access to the full interior of the box. I can foresee plenty of hang-ups during maintenance on this device, no matter how nifty it looks. If the electrician before me cuts the line-side wires too short and/or fails to join the wires properly (very common instance) and something comes loose, you suddenly have to cut access to the box so you can make repairs. A simple outlet exchange suddenly requires a tap & float of the drywall and a new paint-job. Its a pretty concept, but impractical and potentially dangerous in the long-run.

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