Kitchen Waste Heat the Home

The Celcius re-thinks the purpose of waste disposals and recycling units in the kitchen. The idea is to have a workflow where enzymes breakdown the organic waste to create energy, which is sufficient to heat up your home. Filed under the Re-Source project for Domus Academy, the concept is in sync with the dynamic expectations of our evolving kitchen appliances.

Designer: Marcela Vanesa Céspedes

11 Comments

  • TOPRICE.IE says:

    IT's realy nice concept, i think it could be done in reality and i would make my kitchen looks like that.

  • TOPRICE.IE says:

    IT's realy nice concept, i think it could be done in reality and i would make my kitchen looks like that.

  • Grey says:

    Really don't get the flying saucers on the wall..and im all for renewable energy.

  • Grey says:

    Really don't get the flying saucers on the wall..and im all for renewable energy.

  • Manta says:

    I like the style and concept. Now let's see how one could actually engineer this into reality…

  • Manta says:

    I like the style and concept. Now let's see how one could actually engineer this into reality…

  • Nick B says:

    All very nice design, but totally disconnected from reality.

    OK, so at present it is estimated that as much as 40% of our food purchases become waste in industrialised economies. That’s unacceptable and everybody knows it. That figure will come down for a number of reasons, the increasing price of food being one, the increasing cost of waste being another, and general awareness being a third.

    So, let’s think about when fuel was a visible good, such as logs or coal, both energy-dense fuels. Anyone who has ever had a wood-burning stove or coal fired boiler will know the quantity of fuel needed to create sufficient energy for heating water, cooking or space heating. Now imagine a quantity several times that amount (allowing for much lower energy density) of food waste being produced on a daily basis. Even if garden waste could be added, this is completely unrealistic. Part of an energy mix with renewables? Maybe, but at this scale it will be inefficient compared to large scale biodigesters that are capable of taking meat, bones, and woody stems from the garden, particularly when you factor in a goal of reducing food waste to near-zero in the first place.

    Why design yet another product for a declining resource?

    Now, local authorities in the UK are already investing in city-scale plants for converting organic waste to energy. The smallest size that we should even consider for this type of technology is community-scale where people could walk their waste to a collection point that integrates the digestor, which then feeds in electricity to the local grid.

    Making everyone buy one of these things is the consumer goods company’s dream, but an environmental fail. All the sustainable trends are towards shared facilities and community sourcing.

  • jason says:

    i love the direction of your concept, and due to population growth there is not a declining resource of biomatter, but granted it you could make it for outside applications, via a bbq. there would be less smell and a greater and larger capacity for biodegradeable breakdown, such as grass mulching, leaves, weeds, garden clippings and small twigs.

  • Zeko says:

    Hi , I want to know what are the impact of this device .?

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