Exit Made Easy

REDesign Exit Door simply repositions the door handle to make it an intuitive and effective design during emergency evacuations. Most of than not, the assumption is that we are going to run through doors. But in user-situation, it could be a physically-challenged person, a child or even a person crawling up to the door, who may find the horizontal door bar difficult to reach. Thus this vertical, elongated handle serves as a fitting re-design.

Designer: Chen Guan-Yuan

213 Comments

  • Tempest says:

    OH MY GOD. Why aren't people capable of comprehending simple pictures?

    First of all, the handle doesn't pull out, it PUSHES IN. You can see that from the third picture down.

    Now if it pushes in, common sense tells you the door pushes open. Why would you push a handle to pull a door open towards you? You wouldn't.

    As far as the horizontal bar argument is concerned, this design is no less effective than that one. This one has more advantages which have already been stated (like, it can be reached by small people and people who, for whatever reason, aren't standing upright).

    Panic scenario – ok, so your building is on fire and you're panicking. You run for the door and BOOM, you trip over something because you can't see. Now you're on the floor, probably hurt, probably crawling. The only thing in your panicking mind is "GET ME OUT OF THIS BURNING BUILDING".

    SOOOO… you're still scrambling for the door on all fours, you can clearly see the handle on the door, you can push it from your prone position, and presto, you're out!

    I agree with Jeremiah, the point is made and your arguments are null and void.

  • Tempest says:

    OH MY GOD. Why aren't people capable of comprehending simple pictures?

    First of all, the handle doesn't pull out, it PUSHES IN. You can see that from the third picture down.

    Now if it pushes in, common sense tells you the door pushes open. Why would you push a handle to pull a door open towards you? You wouldn't.

    As far as the horizontal bar argument is concerned, this design is no less effective than that one. This one has more advantages which have already been stated (like, it can be reached by small people and people who, for whatever reason, aren't standing upright).

    Panic scenario – ok, so your building is on fire and you're panicking. You run for the door and BOOM, you trip over something because you can't see. Now you're on the floor, probably hurt, probably crawling. The only thing in your panicking mind is “GET ME OUT OF THIS BURNING BUILDING”.

    SOOOO… you're still scrambling for the door on all fours, you can clearly see the handle on the door, you can push it from your prone position, and presto, you're out!

    I agree with Jeremiah, the point is made and your arguments are null and void.

  • Manicol says:

    Conrad Martin is right!
    The horizontal bar design is based on psycological studies of how a croud behaves in panic situations.
    The only reason why this new design should be better than the old one is if the horizontal bar couldn’t be reached by disabled people or children.
    The truth is that it can be reached, in fact the bar is at the hight of the groin of the average person, this makes it easily reached by everyone.
    This new design introduces more problems than solutions.
    Sorry!

  • John Q. Public says:

    I just stumbled in on this argument. I only have two things to add: 1) Proofread. 2) Spell check. Do each of them thoroughly, then go back and do it again.

  • John Q. Public says:

    I just stumbled in on this argument. I only have two things to add: 1) Proofread. 2) Spell check. Do each of them thoroughly, then go back and do it again.

  • sawyer_7891 says:

    The current designs of a horizontal bar are made for quicker access in crowds, but it's true smaller children or little people and some like parapalegics might not be able to reach high enough. This design should be implimented in daycare centers and lower-grade and special need classrooms. I don't think putting one of each or two horizontal bars would work. The only way for it to work is to allow both to unlock if one is pushed, because if you don't sychnronize them the door would still be locked. Probably the best idea someone could make for new emergency doors would be doors that could detect emergencies (smoke, carbon monoxide, etc.) and open automatically. That way, there's complete access to anyone for escape. Plus, then people can't recklessly open the door and trigger alarms, even on accident. I'm not sure why this hasn't been implemented before seeing as how we can have house alarms that do the same (smoke alarms and Dehart security systems) which already can be triggered by such things. But if you wanted a vertical bar, you could always try making the bar wider so that it can still cover most of the door and still follow the similar idea behind the horizontal design.

  • sawyer_7891 says:

    The current designs of a horizontal bar are made for quicker access in crowds, but it's true smaller children or little people and some like parapalegics might not be able to reach high enough. This design should be implimented in daycare centers and lower-grade and special need classrooms. I don't think putting one of each or two horizontal bars would work. The only way for it to work is to allow both to unlock if one is pushed, because if you don't sychnronize them the door would still be locked. Probably the best idea someone could make for new emergency doors would be doors that could detect emergencies (smoke, carbon monoxide, etc.) and open automatically. That way, there's complete access to anyone for escape. Plus, then people can't recklessly open the door and trigger alarms, even on accident. I'm not sure why this hasn't been implemented before seeing as how we can have house alarms that do the same (smoke alarms and Dehart security systems) which already can be triggered by such things. But if you wanted a vertical bar, you could always try making the bar wider so that it can still cover most of the door and still follow the similar idea behind the horizontal design.

  • Fire-studio says:

    Dear sawyer_7891, can not escape doors remain open, as it often with the use of anti-smoke. So good open design (such as this), is very important. Then it must be immediately closed.

  • Fire-studio says:

    Dear sawyer_7891, can not escape doors remain open, as it often with the use of anti-smoke. So good open design (such as this), is very important. Then it must be immediately closed.

  • WhatIsThis says:

    Can no one speak English well anymore?

    • Alaor says:

      Yanko Design is acessed woldwide, and most people write their own languages very well, but aren't so good at english. However, they know english enough to comment as a second or third language. Far better than knowing well only english, by the way.

  • WhatIsThis says:

    Can no one speak English well anymore?

    • Alaor says:

      Yanko Design is acessed woldwide, and most people write their own languages very well, but aren't so good at english. However, they know english enough to comment as a second or third language. Far better than knowing well only english, by the way.

  • Megan says:

    I'm not going to analyze the whole design, but you never, ever want a door that can open inwards. In the event of an emergency, crowds pushing on the door will prevent it from being opened, and it becomes more of a liability than anything. The horizontal bar is called a crash bar for a reason — when you run into it, it flings the door open.

  • Megan says:

    I'm not going to analyze the whole design, but you never, ever want a door that can open inwards. In the event of an emergency, crowds pushing on the door will prevent it from being opened, and it becomes more of a liability than anything. The horizontal bar is called a crash bar for a reason — when you run into it, it flings the door open.

  • ann says:

    what about a sort of upside down L shape? it would have both a vertical and horizontal bar, but they would be one piece. Besides the crash bar does not look the same as a handle; as long as the vertical bar looked like a crash bar, I wouldn't try to grab it, since I wouldnt be able to close my hand around it (as the back is flush to the door).

  • ann says:

    what about a sort of upside down L shape? it would have both a vertical and horizontal bar, but they would be one piece. Besides the crash bar does not look the same as a handle; as long as the vertical bar looked like a crash bar, I wouldn't try to grab it, since I wouldnt be able to close my hand around it (as the back is flush to the door).

  • Andrea says:

    very nice thanks for this idea

  • Andrea says:

    very nice thanks for this idea

  • Mohit Naik says:

    I like this idea but there is one problem.
    Imagine this door is opened and the crowd starts rushing out now there is a good chance that people will bump against this vertical handle which certainly doesn't happen in case of horizontal handles.
    One more thing is that the horizontal handle serves as railing to which people can hold on while exiting and thus increases the speed of exit.

  • Mohit Naik says:

    I like this idea but there is one problem.
    Imagine this door is opened and the crowd starts rushing out now there is a good chance that people will bump against this vertical handle which certainly doesn't happen in case of horizontal handles.
    One more thing is that the horizontal handle serves as railing to which people can hold on while exiting and thus increases the speed of exit.

  • George says:

    The design in the first place is misleading, the handle on current emergency doors will be at a height of 80cm approximately, that means that disable people can reach it and kids older than 3 years old. The light on the bottom thought is a nice idea!

  • George says:

    The design in the first place is misleading, the handle on current emergency doors will be at a height of 80cm approximately, that means that disable people can reach it and kids older than 3 years old. The light on the bottom thought is a nice idea!

  • Carapace says:

    This is a great idea! Able-bodied people love to pretend that there’s only one form of locomotion (just look at the comments here!) and forget how disasters change circumstance.

    My one concern about this design would be the narrower door-area covered by the bar. Admitting I know nothing about engineering and design, would a diagonal bar perhaps work? That would still all for the width of the door to be covered, and the greater height options. Feel free to tell me why that’s totally implausible, and thanks SO much to engineers like you trying to make the world a more practical place!

  • Carapace says:

    This is a great idea! Able-bodied people love to pretend that there’s only one form of locomotion (just look at the comments here!) and forget how disasters change circumstance.

    My one concern about this design would be the narrower door-area covered by the bar. Admitting I know nothing about engineering and design, would a diagonal bar perhaps work? That would still all for the width of the door to be covered, and the greater height options. Feel free to tell me why that’s totally implausible, and thanks SO much to engineers like you trying to make the world a more practical place!

  • Duder says:

    Why not just have this bar, without all the expensive bells and whistles, over top of a standard exit device. That way when you press the vertical bar, the horizontal bar is pressed by it. If you don't hit the side bar you can use the standard bar instead.
    Just my two cents. I do sell these things… The horizontal ones at least.
    Also, the reason you don't see one high and one low is because generally speaking, the exit device is more expensive than the rest of the door, frame, and hardware combined.

    • dan says:

      I can't believe it. Someone actually said something sensible. But I would also add that the door should open if the handle is either pulled or pushed. Because you will inevitably have someone pulling on the handle in a panic instead of just pushing it. Or vice versa. People do this all the time anyway so I would imagine its pretty common in emergency situations.

  • Duder says:

    Why not just have this bar, without all the expensive bells and whistles, over top of a standard exit device. That way when you press the vertical bar, the horizontal bar is pressed by it. If you don't hit the side bar you can use the standard bar instead.
    Just my two cents. I do sell these things… The horizontal ones at least.
    Also, the reason you don't see one high and one low is because generally speaking, the exit device is more expensive than the rest of the door, frame, and hardware combined.

    • dan says:

      I can't believe it. Someone actually said something sensible. But I would also add that the door should open if the handle is either pulled or pushed. Because you will inevitably have someone pulling on the handle in a panic instead of just pushing it. Or vice versa. People do this all the time anyway so I would imagine its pretty common in emergency situations.

  • In case of emergency open fridge.
    People might get confused.

    "AHHHHH! The building's on FIRE!!!!!!! But man, I could really use a sandwich right now… PERFECT! An emergency fridge door!"

    Totally joking. I think this is a pretty good idea.

  • In case of emergency open fridge.
    People might get confused.

    “AHHHHH! The building's on FIRE!!!!!!! But man, I could really use a sandwich right now… PERFECT! An emergency fridge door!”

    Totally joking. I think this is a pretty good idea.

  • tony says:

    irrelevant of whether or not the bar should be horizontal or vertical, the idea of putting a florescent strip of tape on the bottom of the door is a good idea. when shit's burning down you want to be able to clearly see the exit, and something that extends visibility is perfect

  • tony says:

    irrelevant of whether or not the bar should be horizontal or vertical, the idea of putting a florescent strip of tape on the bottom of the door is a good idea. when shit's burning down you want to be able to clearly see the exit, and something that extends visibility is perfect

  • willyman says:

    I think this is a pretty good idea.

  • willyman says:

    I think this is a pretty good idea.

  • mauco says:

    I like both the horizontal and vertical door handle design. But to satisfy everyone, why can’t we simply have both?

    I vote for a horizontal and vertical bar design on the doors both in office and home accommodations.

  • mauco says:

    I like both the horizontal and vertical door handle design. But to satisfy everyone, why can’t we simply have both?

    I vote for a horizontal and vertical bar design on the doors both in office and home accommodations.

  • Chen says:

    Thank you all, I will improve.

  • Chen says:

    Thank you all, I will improve.

  • Davey says:

    My next house will have Fire Exit lights on the Baseboards! I do not understand why this in't made law. Smoke rises clear falls. How does one see what the best escape route is?

  • Davey says:

    My next house will have Fire Exit lights on the Baseboards! I do not understand why this in't made law. Smoke rises clear falls. How does one see what the best escape route is?

  • Brad L. says:

    Nice try. Others have pointed out why the existing bar design is horizontal. Your line of thinking should be encouraged and thus come up with a hybrid design and get it out there. As for myself, I have always wondered about a wide kick-plate at the bottom of the door… if I can't figure out the handle arrangement then I'll try kicking a door open as next strategy. Good work..!

  • Brad L. says:

    Nice try. Others have pointed out why the existing bar design is horizontal. Your line of thinking should be encouraged and thus come up with a hybrid design and get it out there. As for myself, I have always wondered about a wide kick-plate at the bottom of the door… if I can't figure out the handle arrangement then I'll try kicking a door open as next strategy. Good work..!

  • rob says:

    good idea, but id cut about half of the design from the bottom, off. the fact that your encouraging children to egress is a little bit worry some, children should be supervised by an adult at all times anyway, they should not be in charge of themselves if they decide they want to exit.. lets play devils advocate for a minute and put this "exit door" or the side of a build next to a bisy
    street…..you get the point. also as someone else pointed out the first picture is misleading, life safety codes put vertical bars at no higher then 4ft (if installed properly) and typically, if put a situation where an exit device would be higher then that, for example, a mostly glass door, automated openers/closers an emergency egress buttons are put lower for handicap to reach.

  • rob says:

    good idea, but id cut about half of the design from the bottom, off. the fact that your encouraging children to egress is a little bit worry some, children should be supervised by an adult at all times anyway, they should not be in charge of themselves if they decide they want to exit.. lets play devils advocate for a minute and put this “exit door” or the side of a build next to a bisy
    street…..you get the point. also as someone else pointed out the first picture is misleading, life safety codes put vertical bars at no higher then 4ft (if installed properly) and typically, if put a situation where an exit device would be higher then that, for example, a mostly glass door, automated openers/closers an emergency egress buttons are put lower for handicap to reach.

  • Massimo Nastasi says:

    Nice Idea, really

  • Massimo Nastasi says:

    Nice Idea, really

  • and when you have a riot in the event of panic, the horizontal is the only solution, because when you can not push it, your body pushes it automatically, so your solution is a bit naive.

  • and when you have a riot in the event of panic, the horizontal is the only solution, because when you can not push it, your body pushes it automatically, so your solution is a bit naive.

  • willyman says:

    I like both the horizontal and vertical door handle design.

  • willyman says:

    I like both the horizontal and vertical door handle design.

  • Chris says:

    I think two horizontal bars at a central and lower height would work. Kind of a hybrid, taking the concept of being all inclusive with the idea of being able to just fall through the door in a panic.

Comments are closed.