Exit Made Easy

REDesign Exit Door simply repositions the door handle to make it an intuitive and effective design during emergency evacuations. Most of than not, the assumption is that we are going to run through doors. But in user-situation, it could be a physically-challenged person, a child or even a person crawling up to the door, who may find the horizontal door bar difficult to reach. Thus this vertical, elongated handle serves as a fitting re-design.

Designer: Chen Guan-Yuan

213 Comments

  • Yeah. While this design is terribly noble and inclusive, it completely misses the point of why escape hardware is designed the way that it is. The idea behind the horizontal bar is that if a panicked person – blinded by smoke – runs into the door, it will open.

    Children that are too young (small) to open the standard door are likely to need adult supervision to get out of the building in any case.

    And since in the majority of cases the door will lead to an escape stairway, disabled individuals are likely to need assistance as well.

    And, if we take the example of a typical office block, the vast majority of the population will be able bodied adults. Which means this system puts 99% of people at greater risk with very limited benefit to the remaining 1%.

    It might have limited application in buildings where the majority of the occupants are children or are disabled, but in that scenario I'd be inclined to simply put the standard horizontal bar lower.

    • Jibin says:

      Seems like theres a pro and con to both designs. I wonder if there would be a way to combine both designs

      • Yoda says:

        Yeah.. like an L shaped or diagonal handle!

      • Marcus says:

        That's about what I was thinking, If there was a way to somehow connect the horizontal bar to the vertical one, then both sides benefit equally.

    • Petter says:

      Some mistakes you say! Fire all are lying low, the design solutions to be used.

      I like it.

      • I don't it's only useful for places like restaurants not your own home, 3 or 4 year olds tend to try to run away a few times if you don't get them what they want when they want it.
        i know i have when i was little so obviously this is no good to have in your own home it has no style really i would like a door that's fancier with a gold knob and a white door with glass.

        • NakedzBabe says:

          idiot

        • Marcus says:

          To be totally honest, I don't think the design was intended to be used in the average home, maybe an appartment, but not the regular residential neighborhood house.

    • Fireman says:

      Conrad Martin you are wrong! We should give everyone the ability to open the emergency exits. Who knows when disaster strikes, children have no one next to it?
      Moreover, when the fire broke all of them beneficial to the design!

      I like this design, good idea.

      • @Rawfle says:

        If he is wrong, then why do we have a door in the first place?

      • Manicol says:

        Conrad Martin is right!
        The horizontal bar design is based on psycological studies of how a croud behaves in panic situations.
        The only reason why this new design should be better than the old one is if the horizontal bar couldn’t be reached by disabled people or children.
        The truth is that it can be reached, in fact the bar is at the hight of the groin of the average person, this makes it easily reached by everyone.
        This new design introduces more problems than solutions.
        Sorry!

        • Truth says:

          nope, he’s wrong. the fact that due to design people will die, neither this design nor the old one can facilitate the new world of danger.

          There are no solutions to any problems and you are congratulating a wiki-idiot.

    • Ryan says:

      Ok, How about two bars then? that seems to solve the problem…..I don't think it would be that hard to manufacture, just a bar higher and one lower. That's a hell of a lot better than a single vertical pull bar…

      • Tempest says:

        It's not a pull bar, look at the design. It's a push bar, just like the regular horizontal bar.

        I think it's a great idea.

    • echo says:

      how about we just put both options on each door?

      • Structual engineer. says:

        There can't be both options on the door – a horizontal bar and a vertical one – because they wouldn't be able to open harmoniously. However, the idea of two bars, one below the other, would work very well.

        • 11th grade student says:

          if its shaped like the Gamma figure in the Greek alphabet or a T shape it could work harmoniously. as long a they have common push point. or if the horizontal bar overpowered the the vertical but didnt hinder the ability for the bar to be activated that way 1. little people can push and it would operate the lock 2. if the pins in horizontal bar push the vertical bar's pins then the able-bodied also push it open .

    • jsib says:

      what if you made an l shape, wouldnt that serve everyone? i dont know how handles like this work but im sure you could create one with an L shape to unlock it

    • Ryguy says:

      Not really. I tend to find many mistakes in these designs but actually this is a very simple solution to a good problem. Sure, many doors lead to a staircase… But what about those that don't? Sure most people are able-bodied adults, does that mean we can allow them to make a doorway that doesn't accommodate for handicapped and children?

    • MBen says:

      That doesnt make sense what ur saying. If theres a fire, ur not going to running upright… and this handle doesnt seem to make it harder than the standard door to open.

      The excuses you made for why the door wouldnt work were lame and unfounded.

      I guess ull have to learn the hard way as ur trying to crawl through fire, or escape gunshots, having to reach really high to find the door handle, This design benefits all, not 1% of the population

    • anonymous says:

      its a push bar…

      so this whole argument u are making has nothing to do with this new design but rather defending the old one that is the same as the new one cept it excludes the children/disabled

    • How about making the bar sideways? it would be taking the best of both horizontal and vertical designs to make a good design! win win!

    • Tyler says:

      The reason people "need" assistance in these cases is because the world is designed around the idea that an "able" person is a 6 foot adult male in perfect physical health. Dismissing an idea that could shift this norm on the basis of the norm itself is not only childish, it is harmful to the well being of others. Shame on you, sir.

  • Yeah. While this design is terribly noble and inclusive, it completely misses the point of why escape hardware is designed the way that it is. The idea behind the horizontal bar is that if a panicked person – blinded by smoke – runs into the door, it will open.

    Children that are too young (small) to open the standard door are likely to need adult supervision to get out of the building in any case.

    And since in the majority of cases the door will lead to an escape stairway, disabled individuals are likely to need assistance as well.

    And, if we take the example of a typical office block, the vast majority of the population will be able bodied adults. Which means this system puts 99% of people at greater risk with very limited benefit to the remaining 1%.

    It might have limited application in buildings where the majority of the occupants are children or are disabled, but in that scenario I'd be inclined to simply put the standard horizontal bar lower.

    • Jibin says:

      Seems like theres a pro and con to both designs. I wonder if there would be a way to combine both designs

      • Marcus says:

        That's about what I was thinking, If there was a way to somehow connect the horizontal bar to the vertical one, then both sides benefit equally.

      • ron says:

        yeah put another handle near the floor you can kick that glows.

      • Sie says:

        Putting in a bar that would open at push or pull, which went around a corner, seems like it would alleviate the mentioned issues. It's not too hard to gear-up something that will open if you move it in either direction.

    • Petter says:

      Some mistakes you say! Fire all are lying low, the design solutions to be used.

      I like it.

      • I don't it's only useful for places like restaurants not your own home, 3 or 4 year olds tend to try to run away a few times if you don't get them what they want when they want it.
        i know i have when i was little so obviously this is no good to have in your own home it has no style really i would like a door that's fancier with a gold knob and a white door with glass.

        • NakedzBabe says:

          idiot

        • Marcus says:

          To be totally honest, I don't think the design was intended to be used in the average home, maybe an appartment, but not the regular residential neighborhood house.

    • Fireman says:

      Conrad Martin you are wrong! We should give everyone the ability to open the emergency exits. Who knows when disaster strikes, children have no one next to it?
      Moreover, when the fire broke all of them beneficial to the design!

      I like this design, good idea.

      • @Rawfle says:

        If he is wrong, then why do we have a door in the first place?

        • violet says:

          Why do you have door at home? To keep your children and grandparent locked in, or to keep burglars and uninvited guest outside?

    • Ryan says:

      Ok, How about two bars then? that seems to solve the problem…..I don't think it would be that hard to manufacture, just a bar higher and one lower. That's a hell of a lot better than a single vertical pull bar…

      • Tempest says:

        It's not a pull bar, look at the design. It's a push bar, just like the regular horizontal bar.

        I think it's a great idea.

    • echo says:

      how about we just put both options on each door?

      • Structual engineer. says:

        There can't be both options on the door – a horizontal bar and a vertical one – because they wouldn't be able to open harmoniously. However, the idea of two bars, one below the other, would work very well.

        • 11th grade student says:

          if its shaped like the Gamma figure in the Greek alphabet or a T shape it could work harmoniously. as long a they have common push point. or if the horizontal bar overpowered the the vertical but didnt hinder the ability for the bar to be activated that way 1. little people can push and it would operate the lock 2. if the pins in horizontal bar push the vertical bar's pins then the able-bodied also push it open .

    • jsib says:

      what if you made an l shape, wouldnt that serve everyone? i dont know how handles like this work but im sure you could create one with an L shape to unlock it

    • Ryguy says:

      Not really. I tend to find many mistakes in these designs but actually this is a very simple solution to a good problem. Sure, many doors lead to a staircase… But what about those that don't? Sure most people are able-bodied adults, does that mean we can allow them to make a doorway that doesn't accommodate for handicapped and children?

    • MBen says:

      That doesnt make sense what ur saying. If theres a fire, ur not going to running upright… and this handle doesnt seem to make it harder than the standard door to open.

      The excuses you made for why the door wouldnt work were lame and unfounded.

      I guess ull have to learn the hard way as ur trying to crawl through fire, or escape gunshots, having to reach really high to find the door handle, This design benefits all, not 1% of the population

    • How about making the bar sideways? it would be taking the best of both horizontal and vertical designs to make a good design! win win!

    • Tyler says:

      The reason people “need” assistance in these cases is because the world is designed around the idea that an “able” person is a 6 foot adult male in perfect physical health. Dismissing an idea that could shift this norm on the basis of the norm itself is not only childish, it is harmful to the well being of others. Shame on you, sir.

  • Rai says:

    you made a mistake .. ( Disable ) word is not usable anymore because they are calling right now ( people with speacial needs)..

    nice design anyway..

    • Sayswhathemeans says:

      Apparently the government does not agree with your term (people with special needs) because they send out hundreds of thousands of DISABILITY checks every month.

      • Emily says:

        We also still have an organization called the NAACP, even though no one thinks it's ok to use the term "colored people" anymore. It's called outmoded language. It happens. All the time.

  • Rai says:

    you made a mistake .. ( Disable ) word is not usable anymore because they are calling right now ( people with speacial needs)..

    nice design anyway..

    • Sayswhathemeans says:

      Apparently the government does not agree with your term (people with special needs) because they send out hundreds of thousands of DISABILITY checks every month.

      • Emily says:

        We also still have an organization called the NAACP, even though no one thinks it's ok to use the term “colored people” anymore. It's called outmoded language. It happens. All the time.

    • enigma says:

      Actually, “handicapped” is the politically incorrect word; “disabled” is perfectly fine.

  • Petr says:

    I don't this concept im proves something or if it makes building safety worse. Anyway the horizontal bars are not in the middle of the door but slightly lower (so that someone on wheelchair can open it as well)…

    And Conrad Martin is right, there is one main reason why the emergency bar is horizontal. When people start to panic the emergency door can get a litlle crowded and that is why the bar is there. The crowd will push hard on the people in the first row and it will open the bar…

  • Petr says:

    I don't this concept im proves something or if it makes building safety worse. Anyway the horizontal bars are not in the middle of the door but slightly lower (so that someone on wheelchair can open it as well)…

    And Conrad Martin is right, there is one main reason why the emergency bar is horizontal. When people start to panic the emergency door can get a litlle crowded and that is why the bar is there. The crowd will push hard on the people in the first row and it will open the bar…

  • Kart says:

    Good design !

    In the fire, the top is a lot of smoke. You can not able to see that the door switch.

    The success of this design address this problem, because you are crawling when the fire .

  • Kart says:

    Good design !

    In the fire, the top is a lot of smoke. You can not able to see that the door switch.

    The success of this design address this problem, because you are crawling when the fire .

  • I think so says:

    Excellent ! It is useful.
    <to Conrad Martin> you ignore the fire, the person is lying low. You may not see the door switch, let alone open it. Like "kart" said.

    But I think that designers should be more emphasis on the design of the lamps and door can be seen below.

  • I think so says:

    Excellent ! It is useful.
    you ignore the fire, the person is lying low. You may not see the door switch, let alone open it. Like “kart” said.

    But I think that designers should be more emphasis on the design of the lamps and door can be seen below.

  • Mark says:

    Useful design. For everyone.

    Particularly in fire.

  • Mark says:

    Useful design. For everyone.

    Particularly in fire.

  • Momo says:

    I think "Conrad Martin" The argument is only applicable to the general escape.
    However, this design is very useful to anyone, especially the body in the fire.

    Great idea!

  • Momo says:

    I think “Conrad Martin” The argument is only applicable to the general escape.
    However, this design is very useful to anyone, especially the body in the fire.

    Great idea!

  • Momo says:

    I think "Conrad Martin" The argument is only applicable to the general escape.

  • Momo says:

    I think “Conrad Martin” The argument is only applicable to the general escape.

  • Helpful … Good job

  • Helpful … Good job

  • Lasse says:

    Well I've never seen a emergency door that big that i couldn't reach the bar while laying on my knees, but anyway do a design that mix em both as someone said would be ideal!

  • Lasse says:

    Well I've never seen a emergency door that big that i couldn't reach the bar while laying on my knees, but anyway do a design that mix em both as someone said would be ideal!

  • David says:

    the function to open the door is counter productive. Pushing the handle in towards the door is far more time consuming and difficult compared to pulling it the other way, strait out, or pushing it.

  • David says:

    the function to open the door is counter productive. Pushing the handle in towards the door is far more time consuming and difficult compared to pulling it the other way, strait out, or pushing it.

  • Vicky says:

    I once read an article,it says,horizontal bar implies people to push and the verticle bar implies people to pull.In my opinion,you should add a logo on the bar to make sure people are pushed or pulled.

  • Vicky says:

    I once read an article,it says,horizontal bar implies people to push and the verticle bar implies people to pull.In my opinion,you should add a logo on the bar to make sure people are pushed or pulled.

  • Chen says:

    Hey! Thank you for your reply, but I has been confirmed, I designed the angle and torque, good for any angle to open. Even more than the ordinary exit door .

    Horizontal handle is meaningless, if you really studied the moment, you will find the horizontal handle to open door where only a part of, the other would be redundant.

    Thank you for your reply.

    • Karen Nash says:

      With a horizontal bar, the side on which the door opens is ambiguous – I've often pushed the wrong end (the hinge end) and had to change sides to get out. There's no ambiguity with this design – the door will open properly the first time.

  • Chen says:

    Hey! Thank you for your reply, but I has been confirmed, I designed the angle and torque, good for any angle to open. Even more than the ordinary exit door .

    Horizontal handle is meaningless, if you really studied the moment, you will find the horizontal handle to open door where only a part of, the other would be redundant.

    Thank you for your reply.

    • Karen Nash says:

      With a horizontal bar, the side on which the door opens is ambiguous – I've often pushed the wrong end (the hinge end) and had to change sides to get out. There's no ambiguity with this design – the door will open properly the first time.

  • Derick says:

    This is a breakthrough in the design of emergency exit doors , it should be facilitated the escape straight handle can apply to everyone

  • Derick says:

    This is a breakthrough in the design of emergency exit doors , it should be facilitated the escape straight handle can apply to everyone

  • AMA says:

    I want one for my fridge

  • AMA says:

    I want one for my fridge

  • kelpostel says:

    The problem is true enough but this solution won't work… If you're in a burning building the handles on door will get hot… hot metal handles wont help anyone because they won't be able to hold them long enough to pull open the door… also inward opening doors aren't as good as outward opening doors for emergencies as an outward opening door will stay open. I agree they should redesign emergency exits… but not like this….

    • *** says:

      It's not a pull door design though, it's a push door…Meaning…you push the handle, meaning the door opens outward…

  • kelpostel says:

    The problem is true enough but this solution won't work… If you're in a burning building the handles on door will get hot… hot metal handles wont help anyone because they won't be able to hold them long enough to pull open the door… also inward opening doors aren't as good as outward opening doors for emergencies as an outward opening door will stay open. I agree they should redesign emergency exits… but not like this….

    • *** says:

      It's not a pull door design though, it's a push door…Meaning…you push the handle, meaning the door opens outward…

  • venrens says:

    good idea~

  • venrens says:

    good idea~

  • Jenn says:

    Sheesh, most of the people replying can't type English to save their lives. This design is nice, but a little ridiculous. I like the doors we have now, more lights at the bottom of them wouldn't be a bad thing though.

  • Jenn says:

    Sheesh, most of the people replying can't type English to save their lives. This design is nice, but a little ridiculous. I like the doors we have now, more lights at the bottom of them wouldn't be a bad thing though.

  • AWorkofScott says:

    Okay, so you pull back on the lever and push the door open.
    Did anybody notice the lever you pull on is very similar to the handles used on pull doors. So, isn't possible that in even non-emergency situations people would just continue to pull on the handle instead of ever pushing the door open? And then think of how that multiplies in panic situations.

    This is an example of someone searching for a problem that may exist instead of finding one that does.

    • jnzooger says:

      No, it is a push in handle. You push in on the lever and push the door open.

      I swear, people don't actually look at the design anymore

      • AWorkofScott says:

        edit out my bad first line and the point still stands. The handle is the same as pull handles but used as a push.

      • Tony says:

        I agree with AWorkofScott, the handle in that shape has generally been a cue for pull to open. A person seeing the door itself won't have the design to guide them when actually using it.

  • AWorkofScott says:

    Okay, so you pull back on the lever and push the door open.
    Did anybody notice the lever you pull on is very similar to the handles used on pull doors. So, isn't possible that in even non-emergency situations people would just continue to pull on the handle instead of ever pushing the door open? And then think of how that multiplies in panic situations.

    This is an example of someone searching for a problem that may exist instead of finding one that does.

    • jnzooger says:

      No, it is a push in handle. You push in on the lever and push the door open.

      I swear, people don't actually look at the design anymore

      • AWorkofScott says:

        edit out my bad first line and the point still stands. The handle is the same as pull handles but used as a push.

      • Tony says:

        I agree with AWorkofScott, the handle in that shape has generally been a cue for pull to open. A person seeing the door itself won't have the design to guide them when actually using it.

  • TheGuru says:

    heres the simple solution: keep the same horizontal bar as it is, only lower down so everyone can reach!

  • TheGuru says:

    heres the simple solution: keep the same horizontal bar as it is, only lower down so everyone can reach!

  • It seems like this design would work in some situations but lacks the idea that is in current doors.

  • It seems like this design would work in some situations but lacks the idea that is in current doors.

  • MARTIN yao says:

    wonderful

  • MARTIN yao says:

    wonderful

  • Jeremiah says:

    Conrad, if a panicked person ran in to any door, they would hit the door with thier face, foot, knee, or hands. If they hit with thier face, foot or knee, then they will need to stop to locate the way to open the door regaurdless. If they hit the door with thier hands like a good panicked person should, that would be because they intentionally places ther hands where the door handle is known to be, in which case, the handle could work in any location. I really doubt the design reason for the horizontal bar on the door was for panicked people blinded by smoke. I have used handles many times that run both horizontal and vertical, as an able body adult, it makes no difference to me the direction of the bar. As there is much benefit to a long vertical bar to people (short adults included) of different heights and situations, I see no reason to even argue the point of why not to make it a universal change. If the horizontal bar is that important just as suggested it could be easily added to the design. Lastly if you want an idea on the body count where this type of design might have saved lives, ask a fire fighter. We change systems all the time to help that 1% of the time situations. (such as the reason school buses stop at all rail road tracks even though the lack of flashing lights clearly shows no train is coming.) Why stop the change at doors? I think the point is made.

  • Jeremiah says:

    Conrad, if a panicked person ran in to any door, they would hit the door with thier face, foot, knee, or hands. If they hit with thier face, foot or knee, then they will need to stop to locate the way to open the door regaurdless. If they hit the door with thier hands like a good panicked person should, that would be because they intentionally places ther hands where the door handle is known to be, in which case, the handle could work in any location. I really doubt the design reason for the horizontal bar on the door was for panicked people blinded by smoke. I have used handles many times that run both horizontal and vertical, as an able body adult, it makes no difference to me the direction of the bar. As there is much benefit to a long vertical bar to people (short adults included) of different heights and situations, I see no reason to even argue the point of why not to make it a universal change. If the horizontal bar is that important just as suggested it could be easily added to the design. Lastly if you want an idea on the body count where this type of design might have saved lives, ask a fire fighter. We change systems all the time to help that 1% of the time situations. (such as the reason school buses stop at all rail road tracks even though the lack of flashing lights clearly shows no train is coming.) Why stop the change at doors? I think the point is made.

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