Visually Impaired with Fine Hands

A new dimension of sightless awareness equipment. This is the “VIA” Visually Impaired Assistant, a pair of hand-centric devices to make the day of a visually impaired person a whole lot easier. These devices use VMD Video Motion Detection technologies, 4 mini cameras, and a voice operated GPS receiver, all to act as both a walking stick and a mapping system. All the while looking rather fabulous on the hands as sensually molded pieces of jewelry (or “super heavy-duty metal equipment” if you’re too masculine for that sensual “J” word.)

These devices use 2 different vibration mechanisms to guide the user away from obstacles and toward their final bespoken destination. VIA is charged via a wirelessly functioning mat (that incidentally, I wish I had for every one of my other electronic devices.) Totally too perfect. Now watch the video that shows the devices in action and prepare yourself for a totally “awww, love” ending.

Designer: Noam Klopper

18 Comments

  • @DerFaun says:

    A very interesting design. I would like to know what a visually-impaired person thinks of it. As a person with a normal vision, I detected one thing that may be a bit controversial, and I still don't know how to choose my words. The white cane is also a symbol of recognition by 'abled" people around. You tend to normally make way for visually-impaired people when you see a white cane arriving in your vision area without even thinking of it. You even ask for some things like if they need help to cross the street at rush hour, etc. – but with this fine device, where is this "tacite identification" ? – Or maybe it's meant to make it disappear ?

  • @DerFaun says:

    A very interesting design. I would like to know what a visually-impaired person thinks of it. As a person with a normal vision, I detected one thing that may be a bit controversial, and I still don't know how to choose my words. The white cane is also a symbol of recognition by 'abled” people around. You tend to normally make way for visually-impaired people when you see a white cane arriving in your vision area without even thinking of it. You even ask for some things like if they need help to cross the street at rush hour, etc. – but with this fine device, where is this “tacite identification” ? – Or maybe it's meant to make it disappear ?

  • Janile says:

    I like this design very much! It's very helpful to those who are visually-impaired. I was just wondering, will this device be out in the market? If yes, when will it be? I'd like to know more about this design because we have a project about latest technology and this device is a good candidate. I also want to contact the designer to gather information about this device. Do you know how to contact him? Please respond immediately. Thank you very much! Arigatou! :)

  • Janile says:

    I like this design very much! It's very helpful to those who are visually-impaired. I was just wondering, will this device be out in the market? If yes, when will it be? I'd like to know more about this design because we have a project about latest technology and this device is a good candidate. I also want to contact the designer to gather information about this device. Do you know how to contact him? Please respond immediately. Thank you very much! Arigatou! :)

  • yi kyoung uhn says:

    good idea!!!

  • yi kyoung uhn says:

    good idea!!!

  • Christine says:

    I think this is a very good idea. My other half is blind and refuses to use a white cane because of what it looks like. There are many new concepts coming out for the blind to use so hopefully one of them will make it to the shops so we can actually buy them.

  • Christine says:

    I think this is a very good idea. My other half is blind and refuses to use a white cane because of what it looks like. There are many new concepts coming out for the blind to use so hopefully one of them will make it to the shops so we can actually buy them.

  • Ethan says:

    Visually impaired (read: blind people) probably could care less what they’re walking assistance looks like; vibrations won’t tell them WHERE the obstacle is, and how did that man know which table to sit at for his coffee date? Besides that, voice recognition technology really is not that well done for a reasonable consumer price. How does a camera, GPS, and search fit into something so small, anyhow? Interesting concept at a glance, poor execution.

  • Ethan says:

    Visually impaired (read: blind people) probably could care less what they’re walking assistance looks like; vibrations won’t tell them WHERE the obstacle is, and how did that man know which table to sit at for his coffee date? Besides that, voice recognition technology really is not that well done for a reasonable consumer price. How does a camera, GPS, and search fit into something so small, anyhow? Interesting concept at a glance, poor execution.

  • So, my understanding is that this is a “pure design concept,” meaning that it is a realistic description of a device that could exist, but does not. No one has actually built a prototype or solved the difficult problems involved, and the video will effectively mislead people into believing that this technology exists. Way to go! Way to make people feel bad when they find out it is pure imagination.
    :(

  • T says:

    I am legally blind and would love to use one of these, if they exist, but I would imagine the price for this device, like a lot of gadgets for the visually impaired, is priced out of my range.

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