Stand Up Wheelchair

This post is about a wheelchair project which allows the user to stand up easily. “The Leeding E.D.G.E” also features easy drive handles with different gearing options to promote accessibility and combat shoulder injury generally caused by traditional wheeling techniques. Designer Time Leeding proposes this wheelchair alleviates pressure sores and makes moves toward closing social boundaries which “inhibit the lives of the disabled day to day.”

It is a world that I do not pretend for a moment to understand, that being the world that a person that must be in a wheelchair lives in. I believe that each person lives a different life, and that each person deals differently with a situation that they might not find ideal, for example becoming confined to a wheelchair partway through life. Does allowing a person with no use of legs the ability to stand up temporarily work toward a better life for that person?

That question asked, this wheelchair seems to me to be quite the fabulous looking bit of engineering. “The Leeding E.D.G.E” features “dynamic drive” handles that work with a rowing sort of motion. More energy efficient and less strenuous than traditional techniques. The chair features geared hubs featuring 2:1 drive, 1:1 drive, neutral and revers gears, and of course, that excellent standing mode.

Designer: Tim Leeding

31 Comments

  • observer2209 says:

    Remarkably similar to this project…

    http://www1.uni-ak.ac.at/industrialdesign/joomla/

  • observer2209 says:

    Remarkably similar to this project…

    http://www1.uni-ak.ac.at/industrialdesign/joomla/

  • Zarqwan says:

    You are going to have a host of copyright suits aimed at you by Levo, Nu-Drive etc if this wheelchair goes into production

    • Zarqwn says:

      Moreover, as a clinical specialist in the field, "Lever Drives" are not very intuitive, make indoor use of the chair nearly impossible, they freely rotate so when you let go, they hit the floor and generally cause more problems than they solve. From inspection, the wheelbase seems very long which will make the chair heavy to turn and awkward to manouvre and there does not seem to be a method of adjusting dynamics and seat angles… absolute essentials. As it is a standing chair, you will need knee blocks. The second lap-strap has been tried before and failed rather badly. Lastly, the footrest hangars will need to be in contact with the ground or another way will be needed to stop the whole thing tipping forward on the castors during standing,

  • Zarqwan says:

    You are going to have a host of copyright suits aimed at you by Levo, Nu-Drive etc if this wheelchair goes into production

    • Zarqwn says:

      Moreover, as a clinical specialist in the field, “Lever Drives” are not very intuitive, make indoor use of the chair nearly impossible, they freely rotate so when you let go, they hit the floor and generally cause more problems than they solve. From inspection, the wheelbase seems very long which will make the chair heavy to turn and awkward to manouvre and there does not seem to be a method of adjusting dynamics and seat angles… absolute essentials. As it is a standing chair, you will need knee blocks. The second lap-strap has been tried before and failed rather badly. Lastly, the footrest hangars will need to be in contact with the ground or another way will be needed to stop the whole thing tipping forward on the castors during standing,

  • Anonymous says:

    WhaT if the user doesn't have any legs? Wouldn't it be more difficult to prop themselves up?

  • Anonymous says:

    WhaT if the user doesn't have any legs? Wouldn't it be more difficult to prop themselves up?

  • Sarreq says:

    The problem with standing up in this thing (as shown) is once you're vertical, you'd fall flat on your face due to the balance of weight being shifted ahead of the front wheels

  • Sarreq says:

    The problem with standing up in this thing (as shown) is once you're vertical, you'd fall flat on your face due to the balance of weight being shifted ahead of the front wheels

  • Hi all,

    Just to answer a few of the comments….

    Firstly, you must understand that this design is a concept, and therefore I haven't had the opportunity or resource to test the standing mechanism, stability or strapping. I am fully aware that this design would need a host of clinical testing before being put to market as a "safe" product. After all, safety is one of the key expectations of wheelchair users from their chairs.

    The chair does feature drop down front legs, which will have to be lowered before standing. Also, the chassis hardpoints were taken from a levo standing chair, to mirror its stability and manoeuvrability, in the absence of having the resource to develop my own tested and safe hardpoints.

    Still, I fail to see where levo or nu-drive would have a problem with the design. The chassis and lifting mechanism are completely different to levo's, and the dynamic drive is a geared mechanism (the nu drive is not) with integrated into the wheel (not retrofit) with an inclusive standing facility. You can see influence, but not plagiarism, what designer worth their salt wants to copy a design…. that's lazy and offensive.

    Regards amputees, this chair is aimed at young, active paraplegics. It was decided that amputees were far more likely to use prosthetics or a standard wheelchair than a standing wheelchair.

    Thanks for your interest, you have obviously looked very closely.

    I am always learning, and appreciate your comments.

    Kind Regards

    Tim

  • Hi all,

    Just to answer a few of the comments….

    Firstly, you must understand that this design is a concept, and therefore I haven't had the opportunity or resource to test the standing mechanism, stability or strapping. I am fully aware that this design would need a host of clinical testing before being put to market as a “safe” product. After all, safety is one of the key expectations of wheelchair users from their chairs.

    The chair does feature drop down front legs, which will have to be lowered before standing. Also, the chassis hardpoints were taken from a levo standing chair, to mirror its stability and manoeuvrability, in the absence of having the resource to develop my own tested and safe hardpoints.

    Still, I fail to see where levo or nu-drive would have a problem with the design. The chassis and lifting mechanism are completely different to levo's, and the dynamic drive is a geared mechanism (the nu drive is not) with integrated into the wheel (not retrofit) with an inclusive standing facility. You can see influence, but not plagiarism, what designer worth their salt wants to copy a design…. that's lazy and offensive.

    Regards amputees, this chair is aimed at young, active paraplegics. It was decided that amputees were far more likely to use prosthetics or a standard wheelchair than a standing wheelchair.

    Thanks for your interest, you have obviously looked very closely.

    I am always learning, and appreciate your comments.

    Kind Regards

    Tim

  • mike says:

    This is already available to purchase…..
    http://www.levousa.com/

    • Mike, this is clearly a completely different manual standing wheelchair, with different mechanisms, chassis, design….. Pretty much everything is different in fact. There are many standing wheelchairs out there. Mine is designed as a competitor to these.

      Please think before randomly trolling topics in future.

      All the Best. Tim.

  • mike says:

    This is already available to purchase…..
    http://www.levousa.com/

    • Mike, this is clearly a completely different manual standing wheelchair, with different mechanisms, chassis, design….. Pretty much everything is different in fact. There are many standing wheelchairs out there. Mine is designed as a competitor to these.

      Please think before randomly trolling topics in future.

      All the Best. Tim.

  • martin says:

    Tim, I like the fact that you are trying out new ideas. I 'm a paraplegic and have a manual Levo. My comments from your pictures:

    Backrest looks great but as much ventilation as possible, any backrest gets sweaty especially during active use.

    I like the footplate to keep the heels secure during.

    Those straps wont work, the user cant relief pressure while sitting and I believe it only possible to support the stander just below the knee, ie lock the knees otherwise he/she will slip through the straps. I found the top strap more comfy across the ribs than the stomach.

    Once standing the user might prefer to have support from the arm rests, maybe the propulsion levers a bit shorter supplemented with a solid folding support?

    I'm not sure how those levers would work but I like the concept of more leverage and power, also not getting the hands dirty all the time. Maybe a dual system: rim push for tight stuff and levers for distance work?

    Re the front footplate pegs, they are needed unless the footplate could fold behind the front casters when standing. Also a pair of roller bearings on the ends would allow that minute bit of movement one always wants while standing.

    Don't let your idea die!

  • martin says:

    Tim, I like the fact that you are trying out new ideas. I 'm a paraplegic and have a manual Levo. My comments from your pictures:

    Backrest looks great but as much ventilation as possible, any backrest gets sweaty especially during active use.

    I like the footplate to keep the heels secure during.

    Those straps wont work, the user cant relief pressure while sitting and I believe it only possible to support the stander just below the knee, ie lock the knees otherwise he/she will slip through the straps. I found the top strap more comfy across the ribs than the stomach.

    Once standing the user might prefer to have support from the arm rests, maybe the propulsion levers a bit shorter supplemented with a solid folding support?

    I'm not sure how those levers would work but I like the concept of more leverage and power, also not getting the hands dirty all the time. Maybe a dual system: rim push for tight stuff and levers for distance work?

    Re the front footplate pegs, they are needed unless the footplate could fold behind the front casters when standing. Also a pair of roller bearings on the ends would allow that minute bit of movement one always wants while standing.

    Don't let your idea die!

  • Aaron says:

    We developed and have been offering geared wheelchair wheels for a few years now and have hundreds of users who can attest to the reduction in shoulder pain that results. In our experience, the biggest value to users is increased freedom. Users of wheelchairs with Magic Wheels (the name of our wheels) can climb hills, ramps, etc with less effort and, because the wheels also provide a "hill-holding" mechanism, they don't have to worry about roll-back. (www.magicwheels.com

    The levers proposed by Tim are a novel approach to increasing power and minimizing effort but I'm inclined to agree with others that they would be impractical in any close-quarters or indoor setting. Still, it's great to see this kind of thought and sophistication going into improving products and tools to server those who use wheelchairs.

  • Aaron says:

    We developed and have been offering geared wheelchair wheels for a few years now and have hundreds of users who can attest to the reduction in shoulder pain that results. In our experience, the biggest value to users is increased freedom. Users of wheelchairs with Magic Wheels (the name of our wheels) can climb hills, ramps, etc with less effort and, because the wheels also provide a “hill-holding” mechanism, they don't have to worry about roll-back. (www.magicwheels.com” target=”_blank”> ” target=”_blank”>(www.magicwheels.com

    The levers proposed by Tim are a novel approach to increasing power and minimizing effort but I'm inclined to agree with others that they would be impractical in any close-quarters or indoor setting. Still, it's great to see this kind of thought and sophistication going into improving products and tools to server those who use wheelchairs.

  • Timantha says:

    tim you're a thief, think of your own ideas. you're no inventor of anything. just a mimicker of other peoples ideas. you're probably a high school dropout HEHEHEHEHE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • Juanita says:

    Could this work for those with use of only one arm? Could there be a sort of one-arm drive incorporated into the design?

  • Dee says:

    Hi Tim:
    Nice design, great graphics!
    I’m more of a design dreamer that a doer, so feel free to use my ideas.
    Purpose:
    I would like to see wheel chair bound have th opportunity to work in a factory, play golf or play a different version of basketball
    ventilation:
    Its critical,one user mentioned this. Most office chairs use cloth covered padding. Problem: the cloth gets wet and the foam does not breath. Other options are pulled fabric, good for fitting the body, but front edge cause a high pressure area. Also, limited back support. A pad can be added but must be contoured or it becomes a pain point.
    My suggestion is a compressible mesh, like a scrubbing/sanding pad with a quick drying fabric like Patagonia’s capilene.
    Arms:
    Great idea. I like the dynamic gearing and a user mentioned avoiding dirt on hands. I found one example: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002HDEGBW?ie=UTF8&tag=tradeforum-20&linkCode=as2&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=B002HDEGBW
    In the mid 80’s a researcher at the Univ of Utah?? displayed a wheel chair at an Ergonomics convention. It allowed the user to go further and faster than racing wheel chairs and was quickly banned. Instead of pulling, the user pushed the arms forward. They steered by pushing one arm forward and letting the other are move backward. I think the handles were elbow high and the hand grips were horizontal.
    Letting go of an arm. It could float in the position released or slowly rotate down to a fixed position.
    Need user input to pick. The float in position has the advantage of quick re-start. Advantage of drift down is to get it out of the way. To prevent the arm from drifting too far, you could add adjustable are stops.
    I would like to see examples partial stand up wheel chairs for amputees. I’m invisioning a small wheel in front to prevent forward spills (face plant), two main wheels and two small wheels in the back to allow the user to apply forward force in a task.
    With all those wheels quick turns become an issue. For indoor use might go with a caster for the front and a ball wheel or two for the rear.
    To make this work the user would need some form of a harness (climbing or kiting) and/or a padded knee stop) No good solution hear, harnesses are uncomfortable and have high pressure points. Would pressure on an amputee’s appendage end be tolerated?

    If anyone has percentages of wheel chair amputees vs non-amputees, please reply to this post.

  • Ian Johnson says:

    Back in 1982 when I was 16 years old, I designed a few variations of this type of thing. Hopefully I still have the drawings. If I do. I might just send them to you. It is good to see people trying to mobilize the disabled. Cheers, Ian

  • Tim says:

    incredible. I hope some day we can have this as more than just a concept. I’ve been in a wheelchair for over 14 years, the last 7 in a power chair due to a muscle disease that has caused severe weakness in my hips, shoulders and most of the muscles in my torso so if there were a power version it would be great. Maybe some day…..

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