Trike for Disabled Tikes

Conceived after visiting a children’s hospital in Jerusalem, designer Shabtai Hirshberg created the A2B trike so disabled kids could mount and ride by themselves. When a child mounts the trike, stepping on the pedal locks the wheels, enabling the child to literally walk right into a seated position. The chest support keeps the child stabilized, and the whole trike can be customized to each child’s needs.The gear based rear wheel makes it easy for the child to pedal since less force is required to drive the system. The entire steering shaft is cable driven so very small movements translate into larger ones.

If you’re wondering why disabled children are riding trikes, it’s more than a recreational activity. Hospitals around the world use it for rehabilitation, promoting independence, muscle development, and balance.

Designer: Shabtai Hirshberg


  • Brian says:

    Interesting story though I have to question who it is actually is for – disabled is a very broad term. The form factor lacks subtlety and doesn’t seem safe at first glance while the color palette is basically asking for embarrassing stains.

    • geo peachey says:

      very intresting product the overal idea for the bike is universal depending on each childs spectral disibility from mild probably to extreme
      cerebral palsay ,i as a father of twins now 17years old would love a product like this my kids love quaud bikes and are great on them however there is nothing that great on the market
      apart from big oversized ugly trikes..
      as an engineer i have came up with items in the past inwhich has enababled them to progress with open gate and walking patern,,
      would like to see this progrees to a market place
      but im sure it will come with a very big price tag.. or maybe if they could achieve a price that
      makes it affordable most special needs schools could have these as a special treat for the kids for an hour a week…

    • geo peachey says:

      remember this is a pre concept inwhich surounds an idea of bsic standard geometry.
      it adhears to wht one needs to aquire when presenting an idea ,, this to me is very smart as someone says the body chest placement id only an idea to give the place inwhich it will be however all plates would be custom made size wise to each subject or clients requirments..
      stability would be formed as a test subject is tried therefore what looks unstable may be ok to someone that has a low dependancy on full posture
      assistance.. however if some one requireing a higher grade of stibility assistance could therefore have a wider axle for example and a more stable enclosed saddle..
      im sure theres agreement in this,,
      i would be willing to try this bike in its real form and not made of mdf,,
      and ofcource give a full report as required ,,,

  • enoo says:

    Ok, is there a way to turn, with this kind of tricycle?
    Or are children supposed to go straight ahead all the time?

    Maybe I missed something but really, I can’t figure how someone it supposed to turn to a side with this kind of thing.

  • zippyflounder says:

    Oh btw, you get a semi well done in that you did build a mockup, and that is mucho koolo in my book…..

  • tat says:

    i thk this is quite interesting.. u found the needs, but ur design doesn’t answer to that.. a good try anyway..

  • Sylus says:

    You cant present a disabled design without a subject.

  • Adam says:

    exactly, for which disabilities are you designing? That chest pad is suggestive, but looks uncomfortable and seriously, whats with the steering system?
    This is not ergonomic. Good build, but seems wasted.

  • M.H.Shokatpour says:

    dear Shabtai Hirshberg
    your “Trike for Disabled Tikes” was really very nice.
    I am the student of Industrial Design (MASTER OF ART) in Iran and I’m working on city bicycle. it was very nice and I’ll be glade if you could send for me more detail of your exciting product (Trike for Disabled Tikes ).
    looking forwards for your replay.
    best regards

  • ente says:

    Who built this wheel? That will collapse by a minimal amount of load.

  • It's highly specialized but it looks very stable, especially with the pedal brake system. Most hospital/medical equipment is expensive anyway so maybe there is a market for use in hospitals and rehab centers. Nice concept.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>