Bookmark Does The Work For You

The Page Chaser is a flexible bookmark that automatically marks the page as you turn them. Ordinary bookmarks can fall out and require you to correctly mark where you left off. Why waste all that precious brain power on something so mundane? The Page Chaser catches every page as you turn. It’s an incredibly simply design that never falls out. Cheap, easy to manufacture, and handy. Win in my book.

Designer: Hyeon Joo Lee

Page Chaser: Automatic Bookmarker by Hyeon Joo Lee

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110 Comments

  • DESIGN DOC says:

    Simple and innovative concept..
    The best bookmark i have come across so far!!

    • Yo mama says:

      Do you guys still read printed books…

      Think of the environment!!!

      • Bronwyn says:

        Books can be printed with recycled material and ink that is environmentally friendly. A book lasts much longer than an e-book. A book can be repaired, but e-books cost more to repair than to buy a new one. Therefore when a book can be fixed and put back on the shelf, an e-book merely goes in the trash. How many people do you suppose look into recycling them? A very small number I imagine.

        • Zarradeth says:

          I dunno what ebooks you are reading, but all of mine are currently sitting on my computer’s desktop and will never get damaged. Maybe you mean a device to read said ebooks, such as a Kindle, but I’m perfectly okay with reading them on my computer or an open source handheld. Ebooks can last forever, as long as your harddrive doesn’t fail they will never deteriorate or get damaged. You don’t recycle ebooks, they are an electronical format, deleting them does nothing to the environment. If you want to tell me that ebooks are worse for the environment than a real book, than you also must think that emails are worse for the environment than letters.

          On the other hand, if you are referring to a device such as a Kindle, there are probably more people who recycle those than you imagine, the metals used on the PCBs in such devices can be worth a good amount of money if you bring it to a place than can process them correctly.

          • Jay says:

            Ecological footprint left by the production of electronic devices. Look it up. No, seriously. At the moment, pretty mcuh anything you do gives mother earth a fist right in the kisser. That box of cereal in your cupboard? Burned about 4 litres of fuel to make it there from its humble beginnings on a random field somewhere.

          • zach says:

            4 litres of fuel per box of cereal? Have…have you been taking drugs, sir? That would make each box cost (at the least) 8 dollars. I think what you meant was that, if delivered ALONE instead of say, in a freaking track with hundreds/thousands of others, the box of cereal would take up 4 liters of fuel. Also, “mother earth” will be fine, if anything, all we are doing is hurting the ecology of the planet (and frankly, More CO2 will just make plants grow faster) Please, thing before you type.

          • Mother Earth says:

            Please spell correctly before you submit… And are you thinking properly, yes more CO2 will help plants but it's more than just CO2 that is affecting our atmosphere, think noxious, then you're on the right track. Please, think before you type.

          • Mother Earth says:

            Please spell correctly before you submit… And are you thinking properly, yes more CO2 will help plants but it's more than just CO2 that is affecting our atmosphere, think noxious, then you're on the right track. Please, think before you type.

          • Grim says:

            You know damn well Bronwyn meant an e-reader. Get off your high horse.

          • Grim says:

            You know damn well Bronwyn meant an e-reader. Get off your high horse.

      • Ian says:

        Paper is a wonderful renewable resource. Trees are planted for the purpose of being harvested, and while they grow they take in carbon dioxide, release oxygen, and stabilize soil. Books can be read on the subway, on the beach, on the plane (even when no electronics are allowed), on a sunny beach, and even during Earth Hour, without consuming any power whatsoever.

        The ever-growing amount of electronic waste, intentionally made with an ever-shorter consumer life cycle is becoming so much of a problem that many jurisdictions have felt the need to impose an electronics disposal fee.

        Thankfully, the paper books we know and love, can sit on a shelf, be loaned to a friend, or given to shelter, school or charity. Just try lending someone or selling your “e-book” file when you decide you no longer want it.

        I can pick up a 50 or 100 year old book from a shelf and still enjoy it today. I’m not so sure that e-book readers or file formats of today will have anywhere near that longevity. Today’s e-book readers will be landfill within 10 years. And today’s electronic file formats will not be readable in 20 years.

        I’ll take a portable, natural, recycled and recyclable, needs-no-battery, paper book any day over more screen time and yet another electronic gizmo.

        • Zarradeth says:

          The original PDF file format was introduced in 1993, that makes it about 17 years old, and it is still going strong. I highly doubt file formats of any type will ever become unreadable. They might become troublesome, and require older programs (especially if they have DRM slapped on them), but as long as computers never cease to exist (I seem to think it’s reasonable to assume this is true) we will be able to read these files. The formats may become obsolete, but that doesn’t mean they can’t be used.

          • Marissa says:

            Books composed of paper products, velum, etc. have been around in various forms for thousands of years. 17 years is barely a blink in the span of human written history. Readability is not necessarily the issue, but how the files themselves hold up over time. For instance, the way files from several NASA missions were stored caused the physical components of the devices to degrade so badly that well over half of the data is completely lost, though the missions were less than 40 years ago. Modern technology is not built for longevity. While it has been mentioned before, I feel compelled to mention the standard of planned obsolescence the technology industry uses. Though they could be used, these older models of existing technologies almost always wind up in the trash or taking up space in the back of a closet. Though some components can be recycled, this isn’t as beneficial as it may seem. Plastic recycling in particular is actually an extremely inefficient process. Better than nothing of course, but not good enough to keep us from limiting our plastic consumption as much as possible.

      • heavy says:

        i have books from the 1700s you cant digitize them sorry

        • Dan says:

          Umm… sure you can. In fact, it’s already been done. check out Eighteenth-Century Collections Online. From their website :

          “It delivers every significant English-language and foreign-language title printed in Great Britain during the eighteenth century, along with thousands of important works from the Americas.”

          • Neill says:

            I didn’t realize you could digitize the texture of the pages, covers, and ink…

          • Joy says:

            Yeah but how much cooler is it to say that you have picked up a copy of a book that was around in the 1700's as aposed to just reading the same book off the internet.

          • Joy says:

            Yeah but how much cooler is it to say that you have picked up a copy of a book that was around in the 1700's as aposed to just reading the same book off the internet.

      • Rachel says:

        In case you haven’t missed all of the B&Ns, the Borders, and the used bookstores all around you, yes they still exist.

        Besides for trees (which, by the way, the world will not be remedied by people stopping reading paper back books), here are some GOOD reasons for reading paper based books.

        Your laptop is a lot more expensive than a paperback book. I don’t think you’re going to want to take your computer to the beach, the pool, or on a 9 hour car trip (due to battery if nothing else). Same goes for Kindles, etc. I read while I’m in the pool.

        Your laptop screen wouldn’t work outside anyways. Glare ftl. Pretty sure at least half the people who read books, read outside on a regular basis.

        Laptops/computers are uncomfortable. Try curling up in bed to read with a laptop awkwardly at your side. Or try snuggling up on your comfy chair with your knees having to support the laptop.

        Sorry computer e-books, you’re never going to win over the typical reader.

        • Amber says:

          I have a kindle, and have had it for over a year and I can use it anywhere just like a book. I don’t have to worry about a glare because the kindle is made so it doesn’t have one. I can buy an e-book on amazon for the same price as it would cost for me to go to the store and pick up a book. With my kindle I’m not using gas to drive to the store to pick up the book. I can stay right at home or anywhere that I am and order a book right off of my kindle. The battery life on the kindle last for 3 weeks or more depending on how much I read. So yes paper books are nice to have but with my kindle I don’t have to worry about traveling with a large amount of paper books. They are are all on one little device that I can keep with me always. Image image how heavy your bag, or purse would be if you had all those books on you all at once.

          • Emma says:

            For me, when it comes to the idea of e-books and kindles my first thought is that nothing can compare to the beauty of books on your shelf, the feel of the paper underneath your finger tips, or the way a book looks when one can tell its been well read. There is something simple and unpretentious about a book that I couldn’t possibly imagine staring at a screen, scrolling through the pages instead of flipping through them. But hey, I’m just sentimental.

      • feel the funk says:

        STFU obviously ur an idiot! they still publish novels for consumption so ppl are going to buy them. 2ndly not everyone wants to read a novel on an electronic device nor can they afford one or care to buy one. also u must be living in a box if you weren’t aware that “they” being the publishers use recyclable materials to make novels now adays not to mention for every tree they clear they plant 2 more but don’t worry you’ll suffocate on ur enviro-mentality by the time there’s enough oxygen for the rest us of to breathe without ur uselessness taking it all up while u hyper ventilate over NOTHING

        • You must be young. We are already developing cleaner ways to use resources. AND not to mention that we starting to come around to clean energy. This whole suffocate nonsense is just a fairy tale at this point. Those enviromentals actually try and lower there carbon foot print. I don’t know about you.
          The bookmark thingy reminds me of the little hanging thing that a lot of book had way back when.

      • Anon says:

        think of the environment?!?!?! think of all the wasted electricity you just USED by coming to this page… probably where you life teh power is provided by a coal power plant, which leaves TONS of C0 in the air, not to mention the fumes from either the train delivering said coal, or diesel emmisions left by truck… so quit yer whining.. and for the record… paper is one of the easiest things to recyle….

        • Oh my, you are all so funny. I vote for books made from paper or other natural sources. Most paper is made from Jack Pines, a pine tree that grows in the least amount of time, has soft pulp perfect for paper and spreads like a weed so they do not destroy forests beyond the original clearing of a section that is used and reused and reused etc. for the planting and harvesting of a tree that is capable of overtaking most forests (making it an extremely renewable resource). I know the paper industry probably better than most of you as i live by one, have relative that work in them and have studied their workings as projects in ecology. It uses less nature/world killing components (energy etc), paper mills are usually found along rivers using the power of the river to produce the electricity to make the paper. Eco standards are so high with paper mills that they are usually the one manufacturing plant that produces the least harmful emissions into the atmosphere. Paper is also the most recycled material, not to mention it's very decomposable very much unlike computers or other metal/plastic based technology.

          As for my personal vote for books. nothing can replace a well worn favorite copy of any book, nor will any e-book increase in value as books do since they do decompose after a while and fall apart, or get burned, etc. leaving fewer and fewer copies available, your e-book will never have the same value.

          As for your comment, Zarradeth, books have been around for centuries, some still intact, the pdf has been around for 17 years… centuries is not equal to a handful of years, after the pdf has been around for a couple thousand years you might have a viable argument.

          • Jolanda says:

            With electronic books, you own the copyright – not the content. The publisher can delete it as they will or change the content, however when you own the actual book – and the publish can't take that from you.

      • Anon says:

        think of the environment?!?!?! think of all the wasted electricity you just USED by coming to this page… probably where you life teh power is provided by a coal power plant, which leaves TONS of C0 in the air, not to mention the fumes from either the train delivering said coal, or diesel emmisions left by truck… so quit yer whining.. and for the record… paper is one of the easiest things to recyle….

        • Oh my, you are all so funny. I vote for books made from paper or other natural sources. Most paper is made from Jack Pines, a pine tree that grows in the least amount of time, has soft pulp perfect for paper and spreads like a weed so they do not destroy forests beyond the original clearing of a section that is used and reused and reused etc. for the planting and harvesting of a tree that is capable of overtaking most forests (making it an extremely renewable resource). I know the paper industry probably better than most of you as i live by one, have relative that work in them and have studied their workings as projects in ecology. It uses less nature/world killing components (energy etc), paper mills are usually found along rivers using the power of the river to produce the electricity to make the paper. Eco standards are so high with paper mills that they are usually the one manufacturing plant that produces the least harmful emissions into the atmosphere. Paper is also the most recycled material, not to mention it's very decomposable very much unlike computers or other metal/plastic based technology.

          As for my personal vote for books. nothing can replace a well worn favorite copy of any book, nor will any e-book increase in value as books do since they do decompose after a while and fall apart, or get burned, etc. leaving fewer and fewer copies available, your e-book will never have the same value.

          As for your comment, Zarradeth, books have been around for centuries, some still intact, the pdf has been around for 17 years… centuries is not equal to a handful of years, after the pdf has been around for a couple thousand years you might have a viable argument.

          • Jolanda says:

            With electronic books, you own the copyright – not the content. The publisher can delete it as they will or change the content, however when you own the actual book – and the publish can't take that from you.

      • JAMIE says:

        TREES ARE A RENEWABLE RESOURCE!!! DUH!! GET A CLUE!!

      • JAMIE says:

        TREES ARE A RENEWABLE RESOURCE!!! DUH!! GET A CLUE!!

      • Joney says:

        Yeah until all the hard drives fail and the government can track what books youre reading. You're truly an idiot. There are many worse habits screwing up the environment.

      • Joney says:

        Yeah until all the hard drives fail and the government can track what books youre reading. You're truly an idiot. There are many worse habits screwing up the environment.

  • Hunter says:

    this is ingenious!

  • Gamer 18548 says:

    This is ingenious ONLY if it doesn’t make a “click” sound each time I turn the page. It’d be like nails on a chalkboard and eventually drive me crazy.

    • GrokMonkey says:

      Just make it out of cloth instead of plastic.

      • Chubbles says:

        Wouldn’t it just stay in the last page? The thing that makes it stay with the current page is the plastic, which is stiff. In order to have a cloth one, you’d have to starch it, which would make it still make a clicking sound.

        Cool invention, though. As long as it’s not more than a dollar, I’d buy it.

  • lairdb says:

    I’ve just mocked a few of these up out of folded post-it notes — my examples do make a bit of a scrape/flick sound as the page is turned, but are otherwise great.

    Notes:
    – It appears that the positioning (height) is fairly critical; a mark indicating the correct level would be smart. (Could this be stamped in as a part of the die-cut or fold steps in manufacturing?)
    – I’m not sure whether the height, or even the entire size (i.e. the radius) has to vary between fat and thin books. There may have to be a variety of sizes.
    – If the living hinge were weak enough, perhaps it would move all the way out of the way, to avoid the click/flick, while still having enough bias to fold inward when the book is closed?

    • Sean says:

      That is a great addition. As the book is open it should float above the paper and only when it is closed should it sink down and save the page. That would reduce the problem with noise. Great Job!

      • Long Tran says:

        You guys are brilliant!

        • Sean says:

          To clarify a design change, if the book mark was actually a little tighter it should pop completely out of the book but still be bent toward it when opened; When it is closed it is pushed in by the inward movement of the pages. Perhaps there are some other paper techniques like those in pop up books that could facilitate this “sinking in”. However, this might be difficult to design for a large book as I foresee the tab wanting to sit at the middle of the spine…maybe there’s a fix.

          P.S. Long Tran you just made my day by replying.

        • CAMIMA says:

          Mr. Long Tran, now that Antoine and Marta had shown that this is not an original design, Shouldn’t it be removed from the site? I mean, you better post the original one…

    • Michaek says:

      How are you folding the postit note. I played around with the same didn’t get a great mock up.

      • lairdb says:

        Hmm — this will be hard to describe purely in words.

        Put one square postit note face up (sticky down, but don’t stick it down) in front of you, with the sticky edge closest to you.

        Valley fold in half along the vertical center, so that you have a rectangle that’s twice as tall as it is wide, sticky on the top and bottom surfaces nearest you; crease on the right.

        Pick it up without changing how it faces, and cut out a “C” shape, leaving the creased edge intact at each end of the C, and leaving as much sticky-portion intact as possible.

        (Stop before cutting if this didn’t make sense, and look at the first small drawing above — visualise it as a half-circle (but the hinge and necessary slack means you need a whole circle.)

        Now, unfold; you should have a hollow circle with a valley crease at the top and bottom; the bottom crease should be in the center of a sticky portion.

        Cut through the bottom crease only. Now you have an interrupted circle.

        Use the middle small sketch above as a guide to sticking it to the front and back covers. It’s FAR from perfect, but if you position it correctly, it’s good enough to demonstrate the concept.

        Let me know if this didn’t work and maybe I cna make a drawing or some photos tomorrow.

  • zafar says:

    One of the best i have seen as yet. Nice work.

  • Antoine says:

    Lee Hyeon Joo’s project is not a genuine design. It is a plagiarism. The original bookmarks are called Albatros bookmarks and were designed by Oscar Lhermitte in 2007. They have been already sold in some shops in England, Italy and France.
    http://oscarlhermitte.com/index.php?work=31

  • Macrumpton says:

    This is actually brilliant! I am going to make one right now.

  • Jeriba says:

    I’m concerned that it would put a notch in the paper as I turn the page. If it’s flimsy enough not to do that, how do I know it won’t break 50 pages in?

    If they have overcome these issues, I will absolutely order a 6 pack.

  • laylaholic says:

    Nice idea, but I can’t see how it’d be strong enough to flip over the page, and yet not strong enough to accidentally rip the page now and then.
    Might be ok for heavier duty paper, but for older paperbacks and the like, I think it’s a no-no…

  • aquajaws says:

    Damn, this is one of those things you wish you would have thought of. Like a snuggie or that brownie pan that has the cutters built in. So simple yet so brilliant.

  • DESIGN DOC says:

    Hey i tried it with the post-it notes, makes a great bookmark. Neither does it make any flicking noise nor tear the page.And its pretty resilient.. Hats off to oscarlhermitte though for the original idea!!

  • Marta RCA says:

    I DONT believe in pure coincidence!
    This project is the EXACT copy of the “Albatros” by Oscar Lhermitte.

    http://www.oscarlhermitte.com/index.php?work=31

    I have seen the development of Oscar Lhermitte’s design back in 2007 (at this time at Central Saint martins in London). And I confirm his concept has been already sold in shops across London earlier this year.
    Red Dot should of course question the plagiarism issue, but some designers should definilty ask themselves to which extend they can allow themselves to “take inspiration” from others!

    • Lee Hyeonjoo says:

      Hi everyone! I’m the designer. Thank you for all the concern ; good or not. But I want to say that my work can not be a plagiarism things with above. Because I made it when I was a highschool student in 1997. As a invention assinments, It’s purely from my head. I invented it because I needed it. At the time, one of my troble was that I can not read a book well. I had to close it quite often(even today..-_-;). I was bothered by bookmarking. That’s why…
      If you can see my bookcase, you’d fine many books with pase chaser. and there more story..

  • Leaf says:

    The idea seems cool in general, only issue is, is if your book gets opened to a page you aren’t on.

    I mean when I’m reading a book and I set it down for a bit, people get curious and they always ask ‘What are you reading?’ as they open your book to look inside, there for the bookmark would move wouldn’t it? Because they tend to open towards the middle and flip through it some, it risks you losing your spot. And there are always the curious people who will want to know ‘what is that?’ [meaning the bookmark] and pull at it. In turn they could pull it out of the position in the book.

    Over all it is a cool idea though.

    -Leaf

  • Dyy says:

    Doesn’t this just mean we all got like really, really lazy?

  • Alexey says:

    Congratulations c receiving the Red Dot award for this project 🙂

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  • Mackenzie says:

    WANT.

  • meg says:

    Frankly, I couldn’t make it work. I use free postcards, but they get lost a lot. Maybe I return them to the library in the books, I don’t really know. I like the Idea of it going through the book and around the covers. Your pictures did not quite make sense to me.

  • Bill says:

    “Ordinary bookmarks can fall out and require you to correctly mark where you left off. Why waste all that precious brain power on something so mundane?”

    Oh yes, I have to agree that my life has been a constant battle of picking up ‘fallen bookmarks’. I so wish all my free time wasn’t ruined by having to spend so much time picking up book marks and placing them back in the correct place. Especially as ‘correctly marking where I left off’ is really difficult. I always forget how to do this. It does take quite a bit of my ‘precious brain power’, placing a bookmark in a book at the correct point where I left off.

    At least this new amazing bookmark has a diagram to explain how to turn a page. That has often been a problem for me.

    And.. What a lovely design. It actually looks like a piece of red plastic tape. very classy indeed.

    I must go out and purchase a few of these straight away. Very clever stuff. What will they think of next? I am so looking forward to the future.

  • earl says:

    Shouldn’t the last line be “Win. In my book.” ?

    • Alcina says:

      No, I think he meant it like, “That’s a win in my book.”

      Not sure if this is something I’d be interested in, seeing as I could simply use a sticky note to mark my page. Good design, though, for someone who would use it. Hats off to the original inventor.

  • Dude says:

    The world doesn’t need better bookmarks.

  • Neill says:

    I didn’t realize you could digitize the texture of the pages, covers, and ink…

  • Jim Weldon says:

    I'm an old guy. 72. I used to collect records. Started with 78 RPM, and the the 45's came along. Those were followed by 33 1/3. Not much of a problem because record players could play all of them. At first you had to buy an adapter spindle, but it worked, so I spent a small fortune collecting music on albums. Then came the four track tape cartridges. I thought that was the best thing invented and spent a half of a small fortune on those. They didn't last long, before the reel to reel tapes came out. I geared up with component devices. Speakers, power amps, tapes recorders, interface, tuners, etc. Looked like a communication control room. Then I spent a horrible amount of my life moving the albums to reel tape. Before I finished, the tape cassettes came out, and since you could play them in your car, I bought a new car with a cassette player, and started the process of moving my music to cassette. And of course digital sound came out with disks. Not to be defeated after all these years, I added computers to my command center and started burning disks. Since my car would only play cassettes, I had to buy a new car that would play a disk. Finally finished last year, then music went to flash drives, I started sticking flash drives in my computer to record the music, when I noticed an old book on my desk. It was printed in 1938. When I opened it up and looked at the pages, I could read it without a computer, or ebook, an Ipad or any other gadget. The technology never changed. One hell of a device. , , , Think about it.

  • Jim Weldon says:

    I'm an old guy. 72. I used to collect records. Started with 78 RPM, and the the 45's came along. Those were followed by 33 1/3. Not much of a problem because record players could play all of them. At first you had to buy an adapter spindle, but it worked, so I spent a small fortune collecting music on albums. Then came the four track tape cartridges. I thought that was the best thing invented and spent a half of a small fortune on those. They didn't last long, before the reel to reel tapes came out. I geared up with component devices. Speakers, power amps, tapes recorders, interface, tuners, etc. Looked like a communication control room. Then I spent a horrible amount of my life moving the albums to reel tape. Before I finished, the tape cassettes came out, and since you could play them in your car, I bought a new car with a cassette player, and started the process of moving my music to cassette. And of course digital sound came out with disks. Not to be defeated after all these years, I added computers to my command center and started burning disks. Since my car would only play cassettes, I had to buy a new car that would play a disk. Finally finished last year, then music went to flash drives, I started sticking flash drives in my computer to record the music, when I noticed an old book on my desk. It was printed in 1938. When I opened it up and looked at the pages, I could read it without a computer, or ebook, an Ipad or any other gadget. The technology never changed. One hell of a device. , , , Think about it.

  • Amber says:

    Ok, has a few picture of a bookmark really sparked this whole environmental debate?? Seriously, it's a personal choice for me… I love paper books, the feel, and I can get them for FREE at a library… most free e-books are classics, and libraries have far more than just the classics. Kindles and reading books on your computer are great technological advances, but digital copies of books die with the hardware they're stored on, so it seems logical to me to continue making hard copies. Back to my original point, it's a bookmark. If you have something against paper books, don't buy it. Simple as that.

  • Amber says:

    Ok, has a few picture of a bookmark really sparked this whole environmental debate?? Seriously, it's a personal choice for me… I love paper books, the feel, and I can get them for FREE at a library… most free e-books are classics, and libraries have far more than just the classics. Kindles and reading books on your computer are great technological advances, but digital copies of books die with the hardware they're stored on, so it seems logical to me to continue making hard copies. Back to my original point, it's a bookmark. If you have something against paper books, don't buy it. Simple as that.

  • Scott says:

    $139 for a new Amazon Kindle, plus $9.99 for each book thereafter. Quite fiscally irresponsible when you can buy used books for $5 from the very same website. Not to mention the cost of repairs/replacements if your electronic device is stolen or broken.

  • Scott says:

    $139 for a new Amazon Kindle, plus $9.99 for each book thereafter. Quite fiscally irresponsible when you can buy used books for $5 from the very same website. Not to mention the cost of repairs/replacements if your electronic device is stolen or broken.

  • Where can you buy one of these?

  • Where can you buy one of these?

  • Drew says:

    I realize this thread is (rightly so) dying right now, but: I bought a Kindle for my wife in 1998. She is an avid reader who has been known to finish 10-15 novels a week. The kindle was easily the most sensible option for her to use, along with a library, to keep us both from being buried in books. We both love books, physical or electronic. The argument for either has nothing to do with "the environment" or longevity of format, but usability. If she really enjoys a book that she gets on the Kindle, she can always purchase a hard copy of that book for re-reading. Meanwhile, she has a first generation Kindle with a 16Gb SDHD card expansion in so as to be able to contain upwards of 18,000 e-books. Yes, 18k. Admittedly, she only has about 3k on there as of today, but the point being: she can carry a library with her on a plane, in her car, to the beach, or anywhere else we choose to go. There's not thiry tons of books filling our tiny house, and there are plenty of ways to preview books that are free using the Kindle.
    Keep arguing if you want, but to argue that books are better than e-books is to say that a horse is better than an 18-wheeler for transporting cargo. Horses/pack animals were used for thousands of years before the car existed. It doesn't negate the automobile's superiority in the purpose. Horses are still much better for many things, but the two really shouldn't be compared in the first place. Books will always be books, but people will continue to invent new ways to tell stories, as we have for the entirety of our existence. Stop knocking humankind for being ingenious.
    As for the Bookmark: This design has been around since long before 1997. I'm looking for photographic evidence, but I swear I saw an ad for a very similar item in a 1960s copy of Reader's Digest.

  • Drew says:

    I realize this thread is (rightly so) dying right now, but: I bought a Kindle for my wife in 1998. She is an avid reader who has been known to finish 10-15 novels a week. The kindle was easily the most sensible option for her to use, along with a library, to keep us both from being buried in books. We both love books, physical or electronic. The argument for either has nothing to do with “the environment” or longevity of format, but usability. If she really enjoys a book that she gets on the Kindle, she can always purchase a hard copy of that book for re-reading. Meanwhile, she has a first generation Kindle with a 16Gb SDHD card expansion in so as to be able to contain upwards of 18,000 e-books. Yes, 18k. Admittedly, she only has about 3k on there as of today, but the point being: she can carry a library with her on a plane, in her car, to the beach, or anywhere else we choose to go. There's not thiry tons of books filling our tiny house, and there are plenty of ways to preview books that are free using the Kindle.
    Keep arguing if you want, but to argue that books are better than e-books is to say that a horse is better than an 18-wheeler for transporting cargo. Horses/pack animals were used for thousands of years before the car existed. It doesn't negate the automobile's superiority in the purpose. Horses are still much better for many things, but the two really shouldn't be compared in the first place. Books will always be books, but people will continue to invent new ways to tell stories, as we have for the entirety of our existence. Stop knocking humankind for being ingenious.
    As for the Bookmark: This design has been around since long before 1997. I'm looking for photographic evidence, but I swear I saw an ad for a very similar item in a 1960s copy of Reader's Digest.

  • b.kiddo says:

    BUT WHAT ABOUT THE BOOKMARK?

  • b.kiddo says:

    BUT WHAT ABOUT THE BOOKMARK?

  • dees says:

    can I buy this?

  • dees says:

    can I buy this?

  • Michael says:

    Stumbled Upon a great argument! I love that people put so much thought and feeling into this environmental debate. It means the environment is important to us; as it very well should be.

    You guys made my day and it’s only 7:30! 🙂

  • Ohmz says:

    an automarked bookmark, I liked

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