Mass Production Gets Personal

Mass Production Gets Personal

Mass manufacturing doesn’t mean that products must sacrifice variation & individuality. Focusing on this concept, designer Thomas Hunt developed Mea, a line of ceramic tableware that allows users to personalize individual pieces through the use of ceramic additive manufacturing. Upon ordering, users simply input the date, time, location, & a personalized message which is then codified in an attractive & unique pattern onto the exterior of the object. An outstanding gift idea that won’t be soon forgotten.

0 Designer: Thomas Hunt

Between The Lines

Between The Lines

Inspired by the emotional connection between object and user, designer Camilla Fucili has created Between The Lines, a collection of dining objects that aim to inspire a sense of play and storytelling at the dining table. The collection includes common dining objects such as plates, utensils, glasses, and a tablecloth, but each presents a unique and articulate twist on the familiar.

0 Designer: Camilla Fucili

When a Knife and Fork Get Together...

When a Knife and Fork Get Together…

I spent several minutes staring at the Twin One knife and fork companion set. It’s a nice modern design by Adrian and Jeremy Wright (omg are you guys brothers?). Minimal, appears well balanced and definitely made for durability thanks to the nylon and over moulded rubber but the “awesomist” feature is the two can connect to form a sort of spring-loaded chopstick. I WANT ONE just to try it out. How about it guys? Oh, question… what’s up with the missing spoon?

0 Designer: DesignWright for Lékué

Turkish Coffee Set

Turkish Coffee Set

The 40 Years coffee set concept is a play off the Turkish proverb “a cup of coffee commits one to forty years of friendship.” The set is designed to facilitate the proper steaming and preparation of Turkish coffee by allowing the dregs to settle into the bottom of the ceramic tumbler. The glass cup beneath holds the all important liquor for a real kick. Everything neatly stacks together for storage. Turkish Coffee sets are usually ornate so it’s refreshing to see a modern version.

0 Designers: Alize Cetintas & Burak Kure

Portion Control with Meat

Portion Control with Meat

The original intent of PerfectPlate is to promote vegetarianism, however I want to look at in a different light. With the unique shape and design of the plate, it’s impossible to pile it high with food. This means eating smaller portions, perhaps a great tool for progressive weight loss. Yea, I’m battling the bulge on a daily basis and such mind tricks do help!

0 Designer: Dave Wu

Dining Table Puppetry

Dining Table Puppetry

I love to play with my left overs. I figure, someone is just going to throw away all the scraps so why not prepare it into something beautiful before it’s marched to the dark voids of a food disposal. Play is a physical expression of our imagination and we need more of. Damn the rules of etiquette! Puppets are flatware shaped like people starring Mr. Knife, Miss Spoon and the mysterious Lady Spoon. Ooo GIRL! I can already imagine the ensuing drama! Create your own stories at the dining table. I encourage it.

0 Designer: Su Jo-yin

An Angle on the Fruit Bowl

An Angle on the Fruit Bowl

In its history, the fruit bowl has always been a central object of table culture. This “bowl” by Thomas Feichtner is a step beyond the traditional rounded body. The open design stabilizes the fruit in position and keeps surface contact to a minimum. In keeping with traditional Austrian design, the structure is composed of solid silver and contrasts nicely with the texture of any fruit.

0 Designer: Thomas Feichtner

Go Tea

Go Tea

Combining the ancient game of Go along with ritualistic tea can lead to disastrous results but Arthur Xin carefully masters that fine line in this homage tea set. The tray looks like a Go board. The teapot and cups look like oversized chess pieces. It’s the whimsicality mixed with minimalism that keeps this design from veering close to a thematic mess.

0 Designer: Arthur Xin (Se Xin)

Bring Luck

Bring Luck

There are bowls that cannot be used because of small defects. And there are people around us that need these bowls. Bring Luck was made to make these bowls usable for people who need them, with a little birdie. By sticking the product onto the cracked areas, the bowls can be used even more usefully than new ones.

0 Designers: Huh Ka-young & Choi Jin-ah

Superstition in Design

Superstition in Design

You’ve heard the old rules. Don’t walk under a ladder. Be wary of a black cat. Never spill salt. It’s all superstition but many people today still follow those axioms so designer Stefano Oliva decided to have a little fun with it in creating Sale, a salt container you roll across the table. I wonder how they’ll react to this.

0 Designer: Stefano Oliva

Hot Bowls Make for Sad Fingers

Hot Bowls Make for Sad Fingers

I love me some pho – the epitome of Vietnamese cuisine, but anyone who has experience with serving hot soup of any kind knows you either pick it up by the rim or gingerly push it off the edge until your fingers can get underneath it. It takes skill and a kind of equilibrium prowess. The Take Easy bowl has a special base with just enough space for your fingers. An effective solution with a simple design.

0 Designers: Cheng-Wei Wang & Jiuan Mau Tzeng

Fork, Knife and Spoon Go Where?

Fork, Knife and Spoon Go Where?

The plastic cutlery set JOIN has a very unique and playful joining mechanism inspired by an old Japanese game. It challenges the classic table setting and toys with proper etiquette. It’s absolutely brilliant. I want it bad – functional and whimsical. Explains why it was awarded the Design Plus award.

0 Designer: DING3000 with Konstantin Slawinsk

Lighter Side of Dining

Lighter Side of Dining

Here’s one of those designs that looks at the lighter side of life. A dining tray set that is very Turntable-esque. Very often we come across such crazy juxtapositions that are quirky and cute. As Emir Rifat Isik puts it, “turntable + dining tray = fun design.” Superb!

0 Designer: Emir Rifat Isik