Sailing Plane or Flying Ship?

This futuristic vessel called the Shark, is part airfoil/part speed cruiser and flies close to the water, lifted into the air by its aerodynamic hull. The wing shaped blade underneath lifts the vessel as speed increases, creating an effortless glide over high waves. Less hydrodynamic drag means low fuel consumption, higher speed, and a smoother ride. The sharp aesthetic, highlighted in Ferrari red, is sure to be a head-turner on, in and above the water.

Designer: Aguila Design


  • Jim Baltaxe says:

    Is this a practical proposal or just a design concept? Has the engineering work been carried out to determine whether or how it can be made to work?

  • mif991 says:

    I agree with Jim B. So far it looks like a styling excercise without any engineering thought. This is common on this site… Nice toy though.

  • Ash says:

    This is going to be a really cool gadget if it goes to market.

  • Donnie Pereira says:

    I will volunteer to fly this glider

  • SHARK, as well as my other designs, BREAKING and XI, are most “practical proposals” as you call it.
    Jan Gielens (Aguila)

  • JimB says:

    Hi Jan

    That may well be the case but you still haven’t answered my question; has an engineering analysis been done or is this as yet just a design concept?

    If this is in production I’d love to be kept informed about availability and price.

  • The evaluation of the working principle of SHARK was made by ooperating engineer E. Dick of Rijksuniversiteit Ghent in Belgium, technical analysis by Louvain Measurements Systems in Louvain, also Belgium.
    I am a designer and offering the licence to the boat building companies.

  • JimB says:

    That’s fine, you are a designer and it is a very appealing concept. I’m also very willing to accept that it could well work.

    Good luck with promoting it. I’m still interested to see it in the water – or on it!

  • Thank you for your kind comment. You can see a yellow 1/3 scale prototype in operation on You Tube –
    Nobody among all the many people who have seen it in full operation doubted about it working or not.
    Perhaps boat building companies are afraid of innovations?

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