A Wacom Wet Dream?

The Sketcher concept is a piece of innovation that I think all my designer friends will want to try. It is a tablet designed specifically for illustrators and designers looking for the best drawing experience. The current crop of tablets supports graphic software, but they lack accuracy and pressure sensitivity. Banking on Wacom’s glory, this concept hopes to give designers a real digital sketchpad that is surreal to use. One juicy function that I really like is that you can use the camera to capture the hand-drawn sketch and finish it off as a digital masterpiece!

Technical Specifications:

  • 12″ amoled multi touch screen with led backlighting
  • 1024 levels of pressure sensitivity
  • Dual Core CPU
  • Android OS
  • WiFi
  • 8 programmable buttons
  • Capacitive jogdial
  • 2 standard USB ports
  • 5.0 MP camera with led flash
  • 1 Wacom standard graphic pen
  • Symmetrical design suitable for left and right hand people
  • Zoom function without changing tablet position

Dimensions:

  • 360x255x20 mm
  • 650 grams weight

Designer: Massimo Battaglia

    26 Comments

    • Quintin says:

      Interesting concept. There used to be (still is?) a company that converts MacBooks to tablet format with a pressure sensitive pen touchscreen.

      I like the left and right handed design.

      Does anyone have an idea of how much power a Wacom tablet uses? How would it affect battery life of the tablet?

    • HRhV says:

      I imagine that the battery drain wouldn’t be too different from the convertible tablet pcs you can buy at the moment. The Lenovo x60t for example has a wacom enabled screen which is pressure sensitive and has decent graphics.
      I’m more interested in why the Android OS? I’m sure lots of designers would like to use other programs apart from Sketchbook Pro, maybe Photoshop etc… would you be able to get enough functionality with Android?

    • Samer says:

      can I add something to it…what about turning it to a normal wacom like the Cintiq when connected to a PC…that will be really awesome

    • CreMindES says:

      The designer should look up, what is AMOLED…

    • pasted from wikipedia :
      AMOLED (active-matrix organic light-emitting diode) is a display technology for use in mobile devices and televisions. OLED describes a specific type of thin-film display technology in which organic compounds form the electroluminescent material, and active matrix refers to the technology behind the addressing of pixels.

      As of 2011, AMOLED technology is used in mobile phones, media players and digital cameras,[1] and continues to make progress toward low-power, low-cost and large-size (for example, 40-inch) applications.
      AMOLED displays provide higher refresh rates than their passive-matrix OLED counterparts , improving response time often to under a millisecond, and they consume significantly less power. This advantage makes active-matrix OLEDs well suited for portable electronics, where power consumption is critical to battery life.

      so? what is the matter with amoled?

    • ynot says:

      AMOLED produces its own light and dose not need or even use a LED backlight.
      in-fact a LED backlight would ruin it.

    • CreMindES says:

      The main reason, why AMOLED panels are thicker, has vivid colors and all-in-all better, is that every single OLED emits light, so you don’t need a backlight at all, as you need it in an LCD display.

    • Milos says:

      Looks good, but I think it is too late for it to be concept. I used Acer tablet C100 with wacom’s penabled screen back in 2003… 9 years ago, and that was not even the first made. There are many similar and stronger tablet PCs since with wacom pen technology, high sensitivity, but also running on windows, so you can even use them with 3D sculpting software like Mudbox, ZBrush, 3DCoat, Sculptris…

    • Fahad Alam says:

      If it’s a multitouch screen then why do you need a jog dial?

    • The Jackson says:

      Nice concept, but I don’t think that the buttons on the back are comfortable to use. Not only you it feels awkward to push something you don’t see, but also they can be accidentally pushed while simply holding the device. Also, I suggest it to be larger.

    • Dennis Ikink says:

      I guess this has as much of a chance to succeed as any other tablet device. It would be a killer tab if it has the capacity of feeling wether your palm or other fingers touch unintended. That’s the sweetspot people!

    • Joe says:

      What about left-handers?

    • lmwodo says:

      i like id i would of course slim it down a little for the users sake or it might crash and burn like the original thrive tablet

    • its nice feature and bright led screen ll think during buy with other top brand

    • Anon says:

      The fabric tab is a bit annoying to me, it would be better to have it a bit higher or a way to get it out of the way. I’d also like a dial to change brush size and opacity, if the rotation and zoom is multitouch, make better the multitouch accuracy.

      Maybe buttons on the upper-lower right part of the tablet for easier access. When the buttons are pressed, they are pressed continuosly, not just one level per press.

    • Anon the point u mentioned is problematic for continuous use .. wacom authority should know all these review

    • Jaycephus says:

      That REALLY looks like a 4:3 10.1 inch screen, based on the size of the hands drawn in, which are probably a good 25% bigger than average. In other words, this thing is bigger than you can realize from the pics. It has the same foot print as my 15.5″ laptop, and is almost as thick. It better be made of plastic and filled with air, or you’re not really going to be able to maintain the spec weight of 1.4 lbs, nor are you going to be holding it that way for very long.

      That said, I would pay a lot of money for this device. I want something like this very badly.

      In reply to the question of why someone would want a jog-wheel if it is multi-touch: you can use the jog for a configurable feature without using your drawing hand. Pinch to zoom and two-finger drag-pan might still be used with the drawing hand, but the jog + modifier buttons could do canvas rotation, brush size, opacity, and hardness modification, for example. That said, I’d ditch the scroll wheel and add in more modifier buttons, since the same modifier buttons could enable a mode where a pen drag is the same as a stroke on the jog wheel. So, press the opacity button and swipe with the pen to change opacity, etc.

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    • Chuck says:

      Nice ideas,
      with a fair bit of experience working on penabled tablets, I HAVE to say for sketching purposes 12 is way too small, there are plenty of small devices for the non artists designed to fit into handbags and briefcases but a dedicated artist or designer (of which there are plenty) really should get a larger surface area. This would also allow for more battery space.
      I long for these products to eventually make their mark on the scene :)

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