Speech to Text Glasses

So you’ve got a fish in your ear, right? You’re in trouble! Unless, of course, that fish is the same one they introduce in “The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy,” in which case that fish, the Babel fish, feeds on communication fed into the ear, pooping it all out in a stream of information that your head can understand. It’s mutually beneficial. So what is this post about? It’s about the “BabelFisk,” a device that works in a very similar manner to the Babel fish, but instead spoken words being fed directly into your brain, they’re turned to text in front of your eyes.

BabelFisk is essentially speech recognition software tied in with hearing aid algorithms that help recognize speech in the midst of white noise. Once words are heard, they’re converted to text on the fly. Embedded controllers turn this heavy task into an easily manageable one, while 2 microphones work together to show which direction the sound is coming from.

And if you’d like to get creative, you could use this lovely device for your schoolwork or office work. BabelFisk can be used to take dictation at meetings and lectures, saving the sound info on flash memory in both audio and text format. Super fabulous and awesome for both the hearing impaired and those students covering for their lazy roommates!

Designer: Mads Hindhede

35 Comments

  • Ken says:

    I don't know about this one. Have you ever tried to read something an inch in front of your face, its near on impossible let alone something a quarter of an inch from your face – such as your glasses.

    It is a nice concept otherwise though.

  • Ken says:

    I don't know about this one. Have you ever tried to read something an inch in front of your face, its near on impossible let alone something a quarter of an inch from your face – such as your glasses.

    It is a nice concept otherwise though.

  • winkosmosis says:

    Is this a joke? Inventors and designers need to stop pretending that speech recognition will work. All you're gonna see on your glasses is "Sorry, I didn't get that"

    Also, Ken is right and inventors and designers need to stop pretending you can focus on a display embedded in your glasses lens. Is basic optometry knowledge really that rare?

  • winkosmosis says:

    Is this a joke? Inventors and designers need to stop pretending that speech recognition will work. All you're gonna see on your glasses is “Sorry, I didn't get that”

    Also, Ken is right and inventors and designers need to stop pretending you can focus on a display embedded in your glasses lens. Is basic optometry knowledge really that rare?

  • Hi I am the designer of this concept.

    @winkosmosis : Have you ever tried using HMD displays – I can tell you that projecting onto a screen inches away from your eyes works well enough – They wouldnt use this in the army pilot helmets if it didn't work.

    Regarding the speech recognition – have you tried using Dragon Dictation? it really is quite exeptional, give it a spin if you like on the iPhone.

    But thanks for your comments anyway.

    • Rob Abbott says:

      Dear Mads,

      I appreciate very much your exploring this concept. I'm a late deafened adult in Oregon State, USA. I have been looking for this for the past 10 years. We deaf have known that the captioned glasses feature for watching movies, is a technology that is very viable, no reason this is not as well. In the US, we tend to have people who complain about any new things that come about based on their existing knowledge base. If we listened and did not pursue ideas based on that, nothing would ever advance. Any time you want to test them here in the states, let me know I really want this to succeed and for many of the nay sayers, I have this to say. I love everyday trying to understand hearing people through my eyes lipreading. This technology will revolutionize my entire life. If it takes time to perfect, so be it. text to speech software that works very very well is already available on a hand held device. It is just that the device is out of financial range of most deaf people, $2,500 to $2,900. As most of us struggle at twice the unemployment rate as non-disabled and most of us are severely under employed, the cost is prohibitive and I don't have a rich uncle. I am amazed with how many people tend to discount that which they do not understand, nor are willing to encourage progress.

    • Janile says:

      Mr. Hindhede, may I know if this device is already out in the market? Or will be out in the future? If it will be out in the future, what year will it be out? Thank you very much! :)

  • Hi I am the designer of this concept.

    @winkosmosis : Have you ever tried using HMD displays – I can tell you that projecting onto a screen inches away from your eyes works well enough – They wouldnt use this in the army pilot helmets if it didn't work.

    Regarding the speech recognition – have you tried using Dragon Dictation? it really is quite exeptional, give it a spin if you like on the iPhone.

    But thanks for your comments anyway.

    • Rob Abbott says:

      Dear Mads,

      I appreciate very much your exploring this concept. I'm a late deafened adult in Oregon State, USA. I have been looking for this for the past 10 years. We deaf have known that the captioned glasses feature for watching movies, is a technology that is very viable, no reason this is not as well. In the US, we tend to have people who complain about any new things that come about based on their existing knowledge base. If we listened and did not pursue ideas based on that, nothing would ever advance. Any time you want to test them here in the states, let me know I really want this to succeed and for many of the nay sayers, I have this to say. I love everyday trying to understand hearing people through my eyes lipreading. This technology will revolutionize my entire life. If it takes time to perfect, so be it. text to speech software that works very very well is already available on a hand held device. It is just that the device is out of financial range of most deaf people, $2,500 to $2,900. As most of us struggle at twice the unemployment rate as non-disabled and most of us are severely under employed, the cost is prohibitive and I don't have a rich uncle. I am amazed with how many people tend to discount that which they do not understand, nor are willing to encourage progress.

    • Janile says:

      Mr. Hindhede, may I know if this device is already out in the market? Or will be out in the future? If it will be out in the future, what year will it be out? Thank you very much! :)

  • And can you feed the text into Google Translate to make my own Babelfish?

  • And can you feed the text into Google Translate to make my own Babelfish?

  • darkflame says:

    The design is fine, although I think the text would need to be projected in, rather then just overlaid. We have nice transparent screens now (TOLED), but I think projecting it in gets around focusing issues. (I think thats how the pilots ones work, as well as Vuzix's glass's. You might also need to tint the glass's a little because of this (can't project black, so contrast would be an issue in daylight without a tint).
    Very useful concept though.

  • darkflame says:

    The design is fine, although I think the text would need to be projected in, rather then just overlaid. We have nice transparent screens now (TOLED), but I think projecting it in gets around focusing issues. (I think thats how the pilots ones work, as well as Vuzix's glass's. You might also need to tint the glass's a little because of this (can't project black, so contrast would be an issue in daylight without a tint).
    Very useful concept though.

  • Susan says:

    I've used a display in front of the eyes with a video magnifier and know that it can work quite well, however, I've also used Dragon Dictate and while this device may work fine with one or two regular communication partners in a relatively quiet environment, Dragon is not going to be able to handle general speech in random environments. It comes down to the old "tomato" vs "tomahto" problem. If I'm having a conversation with three or four people and they each have a different accent, Dragon will not get what is being said. Also, I'm not at all sure how it picks out my voice and doesn't give me my own words back in text. There is also a slight delay in the text so my part of the conversation will be out of sync with everyone else – although this still may be better than not understanding at all. Then there is the issue of background noise – music playing, conversations of people around you but not aimed at you, road noise, construction noise, etc. Dragon is notorious for not performing well with background noise.

  • Susan says:

    I've used a display in front of the eyes with a video magnifier and know that it can work quite well, however, I've also used Dragon Dictate and while this device may work fine with one or two regular communication partners in a relatively quiet environment, Dragon is not going to be able to handle general speech in random environments. It comes down to the old “tomato” vs “tomahto” problem. If I'm having a conversation with three or four people and they each have a different accent, Dragon will not get what is being said. Also, I'm not at all sure how it picks out my voice and doesn't give me my own words back in text. There is also a slight delay in the text so my part of the conversation will be out of sync with everyone else – although this still may be better than not understanding at all. Then there is the issue of background noise – music playing, conversations of people around you but not aimed at you, road noise, construction noise, etc. Dragon is notorious for not performing well with background noise.

  • Kinny Fear says:

    Every now and then, I see a design on this site suggesting that it will increase the condition of life for Deaf people: I've always been disappointed, even angered- until this one. I can't say I'm Deaf, or even a full member of the Deaf Community, but as a student and future interpreter, I think this is a fabulous idea.

  • Kinny Fear says:

    Every now and then, I see a design on this site suggesting that it will increase the condition of life for Deaf people: I've always been disappointed, even angered- until this one. I can't say I'm Deaf, or even a full member of the Deaf Community, but as a student and future interpreter, I think this is a fabulous idea.

  • Naty says:

    Tell me where I can buy??? I'm tired of my hearing aid because I don't hear everything I want like conversation or interrupting the conversation because all I can hear is sounds enviromentally…

  • Naty says:

    Tell me where I can buy??? I'm tired of my hearing aid because I don't hear everything I want like conversation or interrupting the conversation because all I can hear is sounds enviromentally…

  • ILSon says:

    A simple option in regards to the display would be to distort/shrink the display so that when looking at the glasses, it seems very tiny, but when looking through the glasses, they seem the size on the render. Of course, this probably needs substantially high resolution.

  • REY says:

    where can i get glasses to help children with hearing impairment bleak picture above?

  • REY says:

    where can i get glasses to help children with hearing impairment bleak picture above?

  • Laura Page says:

    I’m interested in learning more. Are these available in the USA? What is approximate cost? Are there sites with user reviews?
    Laura

  • SRRoth says:

    ‘BableFisk glassess’ Where to buy

  • Sheila Gritz-Swift says:

    How do the glasses work for a person who needs reading glasses to read close up text? We’re looking at these glasses for my father-in-law who is severely hearing impaired even with hearing aides, but he uses reading glasses…

  • Andy says:

    Where can you buy these glasses? Are they even available yet? My dad would benefit greatly from their use. Please let me know if they are available for purchase and how much. Thank You.

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