Gripping That Milk Bottle Better

As an able bodied person it’s hard to comprehend how simple things like opening a milk bottle and pouring from it can be a challenge for some people. This Milk Bottle Re-design takes into consideration, the use by people who are suffering from dexterity problems; however it doesn’t ignore normal usage either. The solution is one where less or even no clamping force / grip force will have to be applied in order to lift and pour the milk out of the bottle. And thus this new design.

Designer: Konstantinos Ladas

    22 Comments

    • Petr says:

      I have to say I don't like it. Can you imagine stacking it in some container? There is so much unused space left and it would need more space. I mean, classic box of milk is in cube shape and it fits next to the other but this one does not… I hope I explained it clearly

      • Tom says:

        Here in the UK, plastic bottles, not massively dissimilar to the shape shown above are very common and the 'classic box' you talk about is very uncommon, in fact I can't remember the last time I saw one. Anyway, the point I'm trying to make is stacking them is not an issue as drinks containers are rarely stacked one on top of each other. In terms of them not fitting snuggly side by side, most drinks containers are round (bottles) and it hasn't caused too many problems so far.

        From a design perspective there are a few issues I have with the bottle: 1. Small quantities of milk will get trapped in the handle section – this milk, in a small quantity with a relatively large surface area compared to the rest of the container will tend to go 'off' quicker and potentially contaminate the rest of the milk. 2. There appears to be a green 'grip' near the handle, which would gives the impression of a rubber (or other plastic) injection into the molding process (as often found on toothbrush handles). This would make the manufacture of each bottle incredibly expensive. Sure, have a grip, but make it part of the initial bottle mold.

        • hypertraders says:

          Well, we live in a global economy, and you design for just the UK market? I don't know but the designer should also consider storage design into consideration.

    • Petr says:

      I have to say I don't like it. Can you imagine stacking it in some container? There is so much unused space left and it would need more space. I mean, classic box of milk is in cube shape and it fits next to the other but this one does not… I hope I explained it clearly

      • Tom says:

        Here in the UK, plastic bottles, not massively dissimilar to the shape shown above are very common and the 'classic box' you talk about is very uncommon, in fact I can't remember the last time I saw one. Anyway, the point I'm trying to make is stacking them is not an issue as drinks containers are rarely stacked one on top of each other. In terms of them not fitting snuggly side by side, most drinks containers are round (bottles) and it hasn't caused too many problems so far.

        From a design perspective there are a few issues I have with the bottle: 1. Small quantities of milk will get trapped in the handle section – this milk, in a small quantity with a relatively large surface area compared to the rest of the container will tend to go 'off' quicker and potentially contaminate the rest of the milk. 2. There appears to be a green 'grip' near the handle, which would gives the impression of a rubber (or other plastic) injection into the molding process (as often found on toothbrush handles). This would make the manufacture of each bottle incredibly expensive. Sure, have a grip, but make it part of the initial bottle mold.

        • hypertraders says:

          Well, we live in a global economy, and you design for just the UK market? I don't know but the designer should also consider storage design into consideration.

    • Dave says:

      Good to pour, but horrible to carrying, I think.

    • Dave says:

      Good to pour, but horrible to carrying, I think.

    • Peter says:

      1) I'm sure this design will be patented which will in turn make the cost of milk sore even higher. 2) Manufacturing will be costly unless mass produce (I don't see a mass necessity). 3) Shipping cost will be high especially when you can't fit that many bottles in a truck.. so you would need to build facilities next to milk bottling plant which will also be costly (a lot of up front investment). I'm sure there will be other pricing obstacles if you break it down even more.

      The only way I see this working is if the bottle is sold separately.. but I don't see another opening to fill the container with ease.. another set of problem.. but that would defeat the whole purpose of why this container was created.

    • Peter says:

      1) I'm sure this design will be patented which will in turn make the cost of milk sore even higher. 2) Manufacturing will be costly unless mass produce (I don't see a mass necessity). 3) Shipping cost will be high especially when you can't fit that many bottles in a truck.. so you would need to build facilities next to milk bottling plant which will also be costly (a lot of up front investment). I'm sure there will be other pricing obstacles if you break it down even more.

      The only way I see this working is if the bottle is sold separately.. but I don't see another opening to fill the container with ease.. another set of problem.. but that would defeat the whole purpose of why this container was created.

    • Ricardo says:

      I think you are missing the point. These bottles are design to aid the people with dexterity problems while being user friendly for the rest of us. I think they look nice and it's a good solution (with a few issues that Tom pointed out) for people that can't use normal milk bottles.

    • Ricardo says:

      I think you are missing the point. These bottles are design to aid the people with dexterity problems while being user friendly for the rest of us. I think they look nice and it's a good solution (with a few issues that Tom pointed out) for people that can't use normal milk bottles.

    • manny says:

      i think the cap of the bottle needs to be higher up or else theres a waste of space where the milk cant sit higher than the lip placement. overall a great design though.

    • manny says:

      i think the cap of the bottle needs to be higher up or else theres a waste of space where the milk cant sit higher than the lip placement. overall a great design though.

    • anon says:

      Nice idea to address the needs of those with dexterity problems but this is very expensive to make and is very fragile in its current form. The grip areas are too small for comolding and adding on a grip as a secondary operation makes no sense given the low cost of milk jugs. Fragility of this concept lies in it's odd shape for blow molding – can't have open ended handles like that and have it stretch effectively.
      Maybe the viable option is to create the base jug shape and a rigid, reusable handle that uses similar ergonomic detailing but next time spend more time on the styling because this is just plain ugly.

    • anon says:

      Nice idea to address the needs of those with dexterity problems but this is very expensive to make and is very fragile in its current form. The grip areas are too small for comolding and adding on a grip as a secondary operation makes no sense given the low cost of milk jugs. Fragility of this concept lies in it's odd shape for blow molding – can't have open ended handles like that and have it stretch effectively.
      Maybe the viable option is to create the base jug shape and a rigid, reusable handle that uses similar ergonomic detailing but next time spend more time on the styling because this is just plain ugly.

    • Konstantinos Ladas says:

      Dear all,

      As Tom pointed out there are a few issues that have to be sorted out, for example the place of the cap should be higher so that the manufacturing can be easier and there would be no waste of space for milk. The green grip next to the handle would be the same material like the rest of the bottle and not made out of rubber. It was painted green just for the prototype so that it could point out the afordance of the bottle. The bottles were designed in the U.K for the U.k with potential for the global market and it was researched that there is no problem for shipping since in the U.k the milk bottles come in carts with trays and the size and proportions are fine for that matter. the same amount of plastic material will be used and the same process as the current design so the cost of milk in the supermarkets should not increase.. I hope that is a SIMPLE and innovative idea. Thanks for your comments..

    • Konstantinos Ladas says:

      Dear all,

      As Tom pointed out there are a few issues that have to be sorted out, for example the place of the cap should be higher so that the manufacturing can be easier and there would be no waste of space for milk. The green grip next to the handle would be the same material like the rest of the bottle and not made out of rubber. It was painted green just for the prototype so that it could point out the afordance of the bottle. The bottles were designed in the U.K for the U.k with potential for the global market and it was researched that there is no problem for shipping since in the U.k the milk bottles come in carts with trays and the size and proportions are fine for that matter. the same amount of plastic material will be used and the same process as the current design so the cost of milk in the supermarkets should not increase.. I hope that is a SIMPLE and innovative idea. Thanks for your comments..

    • ringo says:

      impossible for blow molding. the green rubber grip is waste money.

    • ringo says:

      impossible for blow molding. the green rubber grip is waste money.

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