Unidrill, For The Drill Challenged

Picture this – I’m holding a Black & Decker drill ready to mount this damn TV sitting on the floor for months. I go in for the kill and everything just goes wobbly. My hands are all over the place. The drill bit is stripping the screw, the screw has gone in crooked, and I’m squealing like a banshee. Not a good look. I’m a 29 y.o. man. I need the Unidrill.

First off, there’s a guide so no more crooked screws. Secondly, the handle rotates 90º so the lefties aren’t “left” out, hehe. There is no trigger per say. To activate the drill, you push with your other hand. It’s supposed to be more intuitive and provide more control since the drill’s speed is directly affected by how hard you push.

As you can surmise, I’m not a handy-dandy person. I like the concept but you crafty types would know better than me. Yay or nay?

Designer: Ji-youn Kim

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Unidrill - Handy Tool by Jiyoun Kim

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22 Comments

  • Hunter says:

    that looks harder to hold to me. for the same price you could get a top-of-the-line real drill.. one you can use will ONE hand so you can actually DRIVE screws in.

  • Russell says:

    Does it drill both in and out, or just in like a dremel?
    ‘Cus I could see it having a nice niche as a simplistic easy-to-use beginner’s drill as long as it does, or pretty useless if it doesn’t

  • Frank says:

    i think it’s a great idea. Especially perfect for woman and younger people. (like Russel said – a beginner’s drill).
    IKEA alone could sell containers of them if the cost is low enough. Cool – hope the designer had a good marketing concept and went to the right people with this before it landed on the web. Tell me where the factory is in China and I’ll sell it. Great QVC and promotion item!

    • Tool Hand Luke says:

      "Perfect for women and younger people". Yeah, as a replacement for actually learning how to do something right, or even close. If you are going to do something, get a few pointers or let someone who know do it for you. Don't buy some hack tool or infomercial money grabber just 'cause it looks cool. It will rarely work like promised.

    • Tool Hand Luke says:

      “Perfect for women and younger people”. Yeah, as a replacement for actually learning how to do something right, or even close. If you are going to do something, get a few pointers or let someone who know do it for you. Don't buy some hack tool or infomercial money grabber just 'cause it looks cool. It will rarely work like promised.

  • reality says:

    QVC item, says it all..

  • Josh says:

    Come on that has got to be one of the dumbest things i have seen in a while. Why don’t you just learn how to use the right tool for the job?

  • Patrick says:

    It’s a bad idea if only because drills will still be neded where you can push VERY hard but still use the drill at a low speed. If the trigger were mounted on the handle it would be a better idea.

  • fdpugh says:

    This is a good item for the technically inept, desperate housewives, or physically disabled (though why they would be drilling is a bit of a puzzle).

    It is NOT a good Father’s Day gift, tool for a RealMan(tm), or someone with craftiness.

    Most decent hand drills have pressure sensitive triggers, or some sort of torque-selective mechanism.

    I doubt also the quality of the item if it is a QVC good.

  • Wot5 says:

    Actually there is a hidden usp behind this design that no one has pointed out, and that is that it will eliminate mess from the drilled out hole.

  • Toll Hand Luke says:

    No professional like myself would buy it. I can't say that putting a screw in crooked should be a problem even for the amateur. If it is, find someone who can dothe (very most basic of) jobs.

  • Toll Hand Luke says:

    No professional like myself would buy it. I can't say that putting a screw in crooked should be a problem even for the amateur. If it is, find someone who can dothe (very most basic of) jobs.

  • Theo says:

    It's completely silly. What makes drilling a hole difficult, is when there is a hard piece of stone or concrete which is exactly where you are about to drill. Keeping the drill in exactly the right location becomes difficult when the drill wants to kick off to the side. A good handyman will instinctively make instantaneous corrections to overcome this. The bottom line is in my opinion, skill cannot be replaced by a machine to overcome this problem. It might work to drill a lovely uniformly composed wall, but that's easy to do with a standard drill anyway, for anyone with any dexterity at all. I would say if someone is so incompotent to need this, they shouldn't be let loose with a power tool at all.

  • Theo says:

    It's completely silly. What makes drilling a hole difficult, is when there is a hard piece of stone or concrete which is exactly where you are about to drill. Keeping the drill in exactly the right location becomes difficult when the drill wants to kick off to the side. A good handyman will instinctively make instantaneous corrections to overcome this. The bottom line is in my opinion, skill cannot be replaced by a machine to overcome this problem. It might work to drill a lovely uniformly composed wall, but that's easy to do with a standard drill anyway, for anyone with any dexterity at all. I would say if someone is so incompotent to need this, they shouldn't be let loose with a power tool at all.

  • Torrance says:

    Firstly, the drill speed should not be controlled by the amount of pressure exerted by the operator, since some materials or applications need a slow speed but a lot of pressure. What is so bad about a trigger?
    Secondly, where you write, "per say", it looks very unprofessional. It is written, "per se".

  • Torrance says:

    Firstly, the drill speed should not be controlled by the amount of pressure exerted by the operator, since some materials or applications need a slow speed but a lot of pressure. What is so bad about a trigger?
    Secondly, where you write, “per say”, it looks very unprofessional. It is written, “per se”.

  • bill says:

    I like the guide and the flippable handle. The push-to-speed-up leaves me cold. Perhaps it could be an optional feature — use a trigger (which I suppose would make the flippable handle problematic) or push?

  • bill says:

    I like the guide and the flippable handle. The push-to-speed-up leaves me cold. Perhaps it could be an optional feature — use a trigger (which I suppose would make the flippable handle problematic) or push?

  • guest says:

    As a handy kind of homeowner, I think this looks cool, but is pretty useless as a practical matter.
    Problem 1: You need two hands to operate it! In many, if not most, cases, you are holding the work to be drilled with one hand, and need to be able to operate the drill with the other. Case in point – your TV. You are more than likely going to want to hold the mounting bracket to the wall and put a screw through the mounting hole.
    Problem 2: Placing the screw on he spot where you want it is going to be a pain because of visibility problems cause by the shape of the body, and it will be useless for drilling/screwing in a tight spot because of he wide short body.

    I agree with others that the key to the example you cite as a reason to use this is using the proper tool and materials – this item will not prevent you from stripping a screw head, for example. To state the obvious:
    1. use a sharp drill bit
    2. use a drill with sufficient power to handle the material to be drilled
    3. drill a pilot hole
    4. Use a sharp screw that is appropriate for the material
    5. use the proper sized drill bit.
    6. let the drill do most of the work.
    6. Use a

  • guest says:

    As a handy kind of homeowner, I think this looks cool, but is pretty useless as a practical matter.
    Problem 1: You need two hands to operate it! In many, if not most, cases, you are holding the work to be drilled with one hand, and need to be able to operate the drill with the other. Case in point – your TV. You are more than likely going to want to hold the mounting bracket to the wall and put a screw through the mounting hole.
    Problem 2: Placing the screw on he spot where you want it is going to be a pain because of visibility problems cause by the shape of the body, and it will be useless for drilling/screwing in a tight spot because of he wide short body.

    I agree with others that the key to the example you cite as a reason to use this is using the proper tool and materials – this item will not prevent you from stripping a screw head, for example. To state the obvious:
    1. use a sharp drill bit
    2. use a drill with sufficient power to handle the material to be drilled
    3. drill a pilot hole
    4. Use a sharp screw that is appropriate for the material
    5. use the proper sized drill bit.
    6. let the drill do most of the work.
    6. Use a

  • OpenMinded says:

    Whether or not any of you who commented would buy this tool, it is a thoughtful, user-experience (UX) based response to an ongoing frustration. The speed vs. pressure issue could be resolved with a multi-switch that would allow for both fixed and variable speeds. The visibility issue in placing a screw could be resolved with an attachment with a sleeve (these currently exist; I have two) that would prevent the screw from tipping sideways.

    It is creative, out-of-the-box thinking like this that has resulted in many scientific and technical advancements. Keep up the great work!

  • Edward De Stefano says:

    Look I love all of the idea I just want one.

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