Pure Safe Water In The Tropics

AquaIris Portable Water Purifier is meant for folks in the tropical regions and is packaged as a really sexy looking bottle. The reusable removable filter is attached to a lanyard that sports all the usage instructions. You need to fill the water into the bottle and insert the filter into the special slot. The water travels under a layer of converter crystals where germicidal UVC rays directly hit every water molecule passing by, thus making it pure and safe to drink.

For more information on this or other James Dyson Award entries click here.

Designer: Talia Radford

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AquaIris Portable Water Purifier by Talia Radford

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17 Comments

  • Jeff says:

    This is completely useless for chemicals such as chlorine, arsenic, etc.

    • t.r. says:

      Hi Jeff,

      If dissolved chemicals are known to be present in the water sources, activated carbon (finely ground carbon) is the most effective filter for these and can be put in a gauze/paper-filter, placed together with the normal filter (there is room)and used as an absorbant the dangerous chemicals.

  • Wow, this is definitely a great looking water filter that beats any bottled water!

    With some modifications to filter chlorine to improve taste and perhaps an optional filter to get rid of heavy metals, I hope manufacturer will see its potential and bring it to the market.

  • Wow, this is definitely a great looking water filter that beats any bottled water!

    With some modifications to filter chlorine to improve taste and perhaps an optional filter to get rid of heavy metals, I hope manufacturer will see its potential and bring it to the market.

  • priscilla says:

    Hi, i am interested in knowing more about the product specification. Is there any way i can have more information about this creative product?
    thanks

  • Berkana says:

    Talia,

    Your design is beautiful, but it won’t work. Unless you actually know of “converter crystals” or invented them yourself, this is a design based on science fiction.

    Sorry to break it to you, but the “converter crystals” won’t work because of physical laws. UVC has a shorter wave-length than UVB, and therefore has a higher energy content per photon. (That’s why it damages DNA.) Minerals that convert light from one frequency to another only convert-down, never up. For example, phosphors in a fluorescent lamp absorb UV light, which has a high frequency/short wave-length and lots of energy per photo, and emit visible light, which has a much lower frequency/longer wave-length and much less energy per photon.

    If the sunlight had enough UVB to convert to UVC enough to sterilize water flowing through such a grid for such a short period of time, we’d all be in trouble. The girl holding that demo unit would have skin damage.

    Please do some book research on how much time exposure to UVC water needs in order to be sterilized.

  • Berkana says:

    This is another design that illustrates why designers need to have exposure to physics and chemistry, or at least collaborate with or consult with scientists during the critique phase of the design. Too many designers invoke nonsense non-science in their designs, and that does the field of industrial design a disservice.

    There have been other designs on Yanko that have done that. (for example, adjustable barbells that magically get heavier by spinning something inside; gravity doesn’t work that way!) I’m not picking on this one in particular.

  • Benjamin Hinely says:

    I would also like to point out that while the components may seem far fetched, how would the need for such things be known and to be developed if not for concepts, to write this off so easily is ridiculous and small minded.

    This would also be ineffective against filtering hippopotamuses, to say something is not good because it cant filter all things is shortsighted. Not everything can do everything. In many situations, this is all that is needed.

  • t.r. says:

    Hi Berkana,

    It is indeed possible to convert longer wavelengths into shorter wavelengths

    http://scitation.aip.org/getabs/servlet/GetabsServlet?prog=normal&id=APPLAB000079000027004583000001&idtype=cvips&gifs=yes

    However, you are right, “Converter Crystals” as such do nto yet exist. But, as Benjamin points out, concepts should be far fethched and incite scientific investigation and realisation. Science fiction feeds the mind to investigate in directions (and in this case, applications) which were previously unthought of. In the rising age of nano-technology, pretty much anything is possible. And believe or not, ID´s do work together and/or consult visionary scientists as early as the research stage.

    Also, in reference to your “girl burning hand”; it´s not mentioned in the text, but if you look closely at the picture there is a reflective material beneath the crystals, between which the water flows (through a space 0,1 mm thick – so it pretty much travels through this “purifying” space in slow motion allowing a significant amount of time for germinising, protecting the user of UVC. It isn´t possible to pack in all the information a conceptual object carries in a short text, leaving room for more detailed questions.

    Lastly, remmeber this is conceptual design – an envisionment of how man can create a simpler coexistence with its environment.

    thanks for your comments everyone!

  • Victor Goh says:

    Gorgeous design can be used as a replacement for the common tap. Even at its conceptual stage, its a work of art. Even if it cannot serve its current purpose (due to technological limitations), i’m sure this piece, with some modifications will sell if it were used for luxury home water dispenser units or even art-deco taps. We’ve seen too much of metal and transluscent/transparent designs such as these would be a great cure to our eyesores.

    e.g. converted AquaIris unit coming out from the center of a 2 x 2 feet reflective background on the wall to dispense water like a tap. Half moon, Pitchercup design glass basin below to drain the dirty water away.

    In southeast asia, many creative restaurant owners have made use of wood/bamboo (and similarly themed furniture) to replace the common tap, creating a natural like environment to the user. Problem is, wood does not last and the coating which may wear and tear may be poisonous.

  • Jimmy C says:

    NO NO NO NO NO! This is a CONCEPT! Noone needs to know about UV crystal whatever yet!
    If you really want it to be realistic, you can make your own! Stop being such downers and pessimists!

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