Braille E-Book

Visually challenged people require braille books in order to read. However, not many books are available in braille due to cost and inefficiency. Translating a 500 page book into braille nearly doubles the thickness. EAP is a technology that can dynamically change the surface pattern by way of an electromagnetic signal – simulating braille text. Not exactly a new idea but a nice executive nonetheless.

Designers: Seon-Keun Park, Byung-Min Woo, Sun-Hye Woo & Jin-Sun Park

165 Comments

  • Bashaw says:

    It is a wonderful idea. I want one now. I am a TVI with a blind 3rd grader that would benefit from this technology. We have an entire closet full of volumes of braille books. This would reduce that to a handheld device without losing the reading aspect of the learning process. Braille is as important to the blind, as print is to the sighted.

  • Bashaw says:

    It is a wonderful idea. I want one now. I am a TVI with a blind 3rd grader that would benefit from this technology. We have an entire closet full of volumes of braille books. This would reduce that to a handheld device without losing the reading aspect of the learning process. Braille is as important to the blind, as print is to the sighted.

  • gargetkid says:

    This is a wonderful, but not new idea. However, who is going to produce it? We need it now. It must be as large as a iPad inorder to read the Braille. Who says blind people are going to need help downloading the books? Some of us even write the codes. The big problem with this idea is cost/scale. Since there are not a lot of people who are going to take advantage of this, the cost can't be spread over a large group. This is the main reason it hasn't happened yet. Please get it out there to people who really need it! Also, for those of you who think audio books are the way to go – why bother having college kids have books when they can download stuff. Braille is how a blind person learns to read and write, and is as important as print is to others.

  • gargetkid says:

    This is a wonderful, but not new idea. However, who is going to produce it? We need it now. It must be as large as a iPad inorder to read the Braille. Who says blind people are going to need help downloading the books? Some of us even write the codes. The big problem with this idea is cost/scale. Since there are not a lot of people who are going to take advantage of this, the cost can't be spread over a large group. This is the main reason it hasn't happened yet. Please get it out there to people who really need it! Also, for those of you who think audio books are the way to go – why bother having college kids have books when they can download stuff. Braille is how a blind person learns to read and write, and is as important as print is to others.

  • Tony English says:

    Very few books make it into an audio format. Fewer still make it into Braille print. Braille books take up a large amount of space. Harry Potter was in 9 volumes in Braile format. It would be easy to convert the files used by kindle to be useable for this.

    My son is blind and loves stories. But there are vast swathes of the books for his age group that simply are not accessable.

    I would buy one of these tomorrow if I could!

  • Tony English says:

    Very few books make it into an audio format. Fewer still make it into Braille print. Braille books take up a large amount of space. Harry Potter was in 9 volumes in Braile format. It would be easy to convert the files used by kindle to be useable for this.

    My son is blind and loves stories. But there are vast swathes of the books for his age group that simply are not accessable.

    I would buy one of these tomorrow if I could!

  • Ava Odoemena says:

    “The advantage of this over audio books for the blind (and not deaf) is what again?”

    Well why didn’t you just post a link to an audio file, where you ask that question in voice?

  • Ava Odoemena says:

    “The advantage of this over audio books for the blind (and not deaf) is what again?”

    Well why didn’t you just post a link to an audio file, where you ask that question in voice?

  • Ava Odoemena says:

    Well for someone who doesn’t see many things, you sure know what a blind person needs and what they are suppose to do…

  • Ava Odoemena says:

    Well for someone who doesn’t see many things, you sure know what a blind person needs and what they are suppose to do…

  • Ava Odoemena says:

    Sergio, that’s just silly. Your concept is completely different and not as advanced I might add. Your design mechanically raises little pins or balls, in this book the impression of dots is from a change in a smooth surface.

    This idea here has the advantage that it can be wiped. Yours has to be used in an almost sterile environment, given mechanical devices can clog up with dirt.

    It’s a bit pitiful that you ignore this fact and sign of a brittle ego that you would make demands from the other inventor. Especially given his or her design outshines yours both in form and function.

  • Ava Odoemena says:

    Sergio, that’s just silly. Your concept is completely different and not as advanced I might add. Your design mechanically raises little pins or balls, in this book the impression of dots is from a change in a smooth surface.

    This idea here has the advantage that it can be wiped. Yours has to be used in an almost sterile environment, given mechanical devices can clog up with dirt.

    It’s a bit pitiful that you ignore this fact and sign of a brittle ego that you would make demands from the other inventor. Especially given his or her design outshines yours both in form and function.

  • Natalie says:

    It would work out just fine. People who are blind and visually impaired download content from computers to other electronic devices every day. One of the advantages is LITERACY! Audio is great, but it is not reading. And many people with a significant vision loss prefer to read something themselves than to have a screen reader or other device read it for them.

  • mike says:

    copyright?

  • Sayantan Banerjee says:

    I want to have this ebook reader for my friend in India. I want to purchase this. Please help me, how to get this book to India.

  • E.Aly says:

    Hi: Sean park.. please could you tell me your e-mail or any way of contacting you please..
    i want to ask you somethings about this design could you help me please..

  • amom says:

    braille readers like the peace and quiet with a good book just like you do.

  • Sam Haslam says:

    The advantage is that with audio books, each and every word, chapter and book has to be verbally recited (often by a personality associated with the book) at great expense and time. Not every book (by a long shot) has therefore been converted into audio book format.

    However, with braille, any text file could be converted into braille format that could be uploaded onto the braille e-reader. It therefore opens up the possibilities endlessly: much, much more so than with verbally recited books.

    For example, one would be able to have your daily newspaper of choice delivered that day to your reader, already converted into braille. I’m quite certain this isn’t available in audio book format.

    The technology is there, I’m quite sure; however, I fear the impetus (not enough profit in it) is there to develop it.

    Thanks,

    Sam

  • Görkem says:

    Hello i am very interested in this product and want to ask some questions if it is possible. I would be glad if you could contact me

  • tb says:

    Can this be purchased yet? How much is it? Great idea!

  • Elizabeth says:

    There are many Deaf-blind who love to read! What a wonderful device!

  • Malc says:

    One issue with audio books is that when someone reads a book out loud, by their intonation, emphasis and timing they add something of their own interpretation of the text.
    When you read a book for yourself, you can form your own interpretation more easily.

  • Malc says:

    I don’t have much idea of the development costs involved but would this be the sort of thing charities for the blind or charities like Bible translation organisations could invest in.

    I read on the United Bible Societies website that it costs upwards of $600 to produce a physical braille Bible which is about 50 times the cost of producing a standard print Bible. It also takes up a ridiculous amount of space. It could therefore be in their interests to support this kind of product.

    Alternatively this could be a case for a Kickstarter project.

  • So a blind person can read in public without disturbing everyone within ear shot.

  • Todd says:

    Too often we forgot about people who don’t have many of luxuries we have. Our eye sight is a luxury and we forgot how important it is.

    But it’s amazing to see products like this come out to help those who are blind.

  • Cameron says:

    I use it be for it is really coll

  • Cameron says:

    The people who made this inventions and I like the why the Braille change every time you done reading the sentence

  • maureen says:

    Can you imagine trying to read print where you only see one letter at a time?

  • malc says:

    I don’t know anyone who needs braille so I may be wrong, but I would imagine that once you become adept at reading braille, you can sweep your finger along the texts, so it is not so much a case of reading one letter at a time.

  • Dr. Maaruf Ali says:

    Dear Dr. Seon-Keun Park,

    We are writing a paper titled, “E/M-Learning: The Past, Present and Future” for IEEE Consumer Electronics Magazine and urgently need your permission to reproduce your first image in our paper. May we please have written permission by Monday 23 June, 2014. We shall give full reference to you.

    Thank you.

    Yours sincerely,

    Maaruf.

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  • Good day! This post couldn’t be written any better!
    Reading this post reminds me of my good old room mate! He
    always kept talking about this. I will forward this post
    to him. Pretty sure he will have a good read. Many thanks for sharing!

  • Rene says:

    there’s people blind and deft too . . did you know ?

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