LED Trojan Horse

Frog Design is at it again, this time with an environmentally friendly LED based lightbulb. Although CFL’s are marketed to be widely superior than incandescents, the fact of the matter is they’re still made using very toxic chemicals. Mass acceptance has also been slower than anticipated but it’s obvious why – the cold bluish tint they cast and being non-dimmable.

So what’s the alternative? LEDs. They’re getting cheaper to manufacturer. They use significantly less energy, require no harmful chemicals to produce and can be tuned to give off any hue in the visible color spectrum. The markets are already flooded with a handful of LED bulbs but they have failed to reach mass acceptance and Frog Design believes this is due to poor design.

Their LED bulb looks like an incandescent. It works like one, uses the same aluminum socket and gives off the same warm color. The only difference is energy savings and a life span of 30+ years. In marketing these bulbs, is there even a need to educate the public about the advantages of LEDs? If you package your design to look like the defacto, then you may have a Trojan horse – ready to make the transition to LED bulbs invisible and a reality. Many LED bulbs on the market today are futuristic, modern, and require specially designed sockets. It’s no surprised you don’t see them in grandma’s vanity. I believe Frog Design may have hit the proverbial nail.

Designer: Frog Design

84 Comments

  • juice says:

    nice.but,where is the Driver??

  • tony says:

    Puzzles me why people are suggesting the shape of this bulb. Beyond it being instantly recognizable and thereby consumer friendly it is in itself a classic design. The glass shape has style and elan that allows it to exist without a shade and dimmed to revel in it’s curves. Why anyone has a use for 100w bulbs I really do not understand, I use a mixture of wattage around my small flat placed in corners, etc to work with shadows and create depth. Sheer blinding whiteness is more akin to torture to me!

    This is an excellent design and I want some now!

  • john says:

    the light bulb shape is the problem, and frog is not solving the true design problem. new lighting sources will demand new shapes for lights. while they are trying to create a “trojan horse”, they are not doing anything new here that Philips, Sylvania, or GE has not already engineered and proofed. All frog has done is splash a fancy pattern on the bulb, or a little frosting – something that the little old lady in the craft store up the block from me has been doing since the 60’s.

    Also, assuming that a single LED will create the correct amount of lumination is incorrect. Creating the equivalent of a 35 watt halogen spotlight currently requires an array of approximately 25 LEDs. You would need the LED equivalent of a small disco ball inside this buld for it to provide the type of light you’d expect from a single-bulb lamp.

  • Johnny says:

    Hi there,

    can you please send me more info on the Frog-light.
    And could you please respond to my email as i would like to get pricing on bulk order’s.
    In range of 10,000 units.

    As well what other product do you have in the lighting department.
    A brochure would be great with details and info, and yet again pricing on 10,000 units.

    Thank you
    Johnny

  • Larry says:

    This LED appears to be just a design; all form and no function. Notice there are no photos of it actually emitting light. Any useful LED (>400 lumens) requires significant heat sinking. This design has zero surface area for heat sinking. Any significant LED used in this ‘Frog Design’ setup would burn out almost instantly were it given power to the diode.

  • tony maas says:

    These are concepts – not actual product. What we’d like the world to be made up of rather than the crappy toaster you have smokin’ away in the kitchen and the knackered sofa bleeding its inards all over the living room floor. You know, the kinda place we all actually live in.

  • Spuffler says:

    Apparently you’ve never used an LED lamp to replace the incandescent. LEDs transmit light at a narrow angle. Currently marketed via WalMart, some LED lamps can never replace incandescents because the light from that particular LED design is not radiating outward from the bulb in a spherical manner – the arrangement of LEDs inside the WalMart product (Lights of America, if I recall, but I might be wrong) does not project light sideways nor towards the base of the lamp. So, all in all, we have NOT YET replaced the incandescent; no, not as of this post. CFLs also suffer from not starting when the whole lamp is cold; I refer to typical North American outdoor temperatures as found during winter months.

  • Spuffler says:

    Apparently you’ve never used an LED lamp to replace the incandescent. LEDs transmit light at a narrow angle. Currently marketed via WalMart, some LED lamps can never replace incandescents because the light from that particular LED design is not radiating outward from the bulb in a spherical manner – the arrangement of LEDs inside the WalMart product (Lights of America, if I recall, but I might be wrong) does not project light sideways nor towards the base of the lamp. So, all in all, we have NOT YET replaced the incandescent; no, not as of this post. CFLs also suffer from not starting when the whole lamp is cold; I refer to typical North American outdoor temperatures as found during winter months.

  • dave says:

    i see few problems with this design.

    1) there are no single unit LEDs which can put out 60watts of light., single units 0.5 watts of light at most (currently).
    2) LEDs are DC current, the AC to DC converter is not shown (they are rather large).
    3) this LED would only cast light in a 160 degree spotlight cone, not 360 degrees "bubble" like a regular lightbulb. (see spuffler)

    A "cluster" of 10 LEDs could solve 1& 3 problems
    an LED light would operate at cool temperatures and could be made of clear polycarbonate plastic – unbreakable, recyclable, cheaper – better than glass bulbs.

  • dave says:

    i see few problems with this design.

    1) there are no single unit LEDs which can put out 60watts of light., single units 0.5 watts of light at most (currently).
    2) LEDs are DC current, the AC to DC converter is not shown (they are rather large).
    3) this LED would only cast light in a 160 degree spotlight cone, not 360 degrees “bubble” like a regular lightbulb. (see spuffler)

    A “cluster” of 10 LEDs could solve 1& 3 problems
    an LED light would operate at cool temperatures and could be made of clear polycarbonate plastic – unbreakable, recyclable, cheaper – better than glass bulbs.

  • Bruce[lighting guy] says:

    This is a very cool[no pun intended] idea. The source is in the ideal place, the center of the globe. The globe can be made of plastic, thus very durable. I have not yet seen an LED product with a heat issue at all let alone one close to that of an incandescent bulb. In a conventional incandescent bulb, the glass bulb itself is the radiator. Also the bulb can be offered with a variety of coatings much like today. I grant that intensity may be an issue, but I expect that that technology is much more advanced than any of us have any idea. The largest LED I am aware of is 1 watt ,but my information is old. I have been watching LED technology for some time, and I hope it will save us from the ghastly spectre of compact fluorescents. I would like to pre-order 10 000 units just like that other guy.

  • Bruce[lighting guy] says:

    This is a very cool[no pun intended] idea. The source is in the ideal place, the center of the globe. The globe can be made of plastic, thus very durable. I have not yet seen an LED product with a heat issue at all let alone one close to that of an incandescent bulb. In a conventional incandescent bulb, the glass bulb itself is the radiator. Also the bulb can be offered with a variety of coatings much like today. I grant that intensity may be an issue, but I expect that that technology is much more advanced than any of us have any idea. The largest LED I am aware of is 1 watt ,but my information is old. I have been watching LED technology for some time, and I hope it will save us from the ghastly spectre of compact fluorescents. I would like to pre-order 10 000 units just like that other guy.

  • tryecrot says:

    Yes there should realize the opportunity to RSS commentary, quite simply, CMS is another on the blog.

  • ali says:

    please can u inform me about the price of this bulb and as well as the price of the lots …thanks

  • Chris says:

    Our local Church is a grade 1 listed building and they must use light bulbs conforming to the original style.
    As there are 26 chandelier type shades with 8-10 bulbs each can you imagine the power usage?
    We cannot use fluorescent type bulbs as they do not look the same. We have found halogen ones, but these LED type are a godsend (pardon the pun). The savings in power are huge, and not having to climb ladders to change bulbs every week is a significant improvement to safety. Maybe it is for people like us they produce more than just a basic style?

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