Providing the Third Basic Need

Shelter is one of the three basic necessities — this is why this project exists, and this is why if it doesn’t work, something eventually must. Quoting UN Habitat, the designer of the project notes that the number of people living in slums is currently at 1 billion, and is likely to grow to 2 billion by 2030. Blocks House is an shelter project made to create houses of any size to accommodate a family. Blocks Houses are made of recycled Polyethylene, Polypropylene and can protect people from the elements at a low cost.

Creating a new pod (or Blocks House) is a process that requires only the molding of sets of two or three unique blocks, its inexpensiveness making it accessable to slum villages. Replacement pieces can be accessed, and old houses can be recycled into new ones. Blocks House relies on natural resources like daylight, air, and rain water harvesting ability, and is not attached to the land so that it may be easily dismantled and moved around.

Take a peek at the video below!

Designer: Altamash Jiwani

17 Comments

  • Swapnil says:

    Great job..

  • Swapnil says:

    Great job..

  • aline says:

    not attached to the land? hmmm
    You know, most slums here in Brasil are constructed on hills, because that’s the periferic area, where poor people have “space” to build their homes… Any rain and the house would be dragged down…

    • Altamash Jiwani says:

      Slums on Hills- never seen it in India. I appreciate you brought that up. A cement base/platform can be used to protect from heavy rains and further the bolts can be used to fix the house in place if required. -Altamash Jiwani

  • aline says:

    not attached to the land? hmmm
    You know, most slums here in Brasil are constructed on hills, because that’s the periferic area, where poor people have “space” to build their homes… Any rain and the house would be dragged down…

  • aline says:

    not attached to the land? hmmm
    You know, most slums here in Brasil are constructed on hills, because that’s the periferic area, where poor people have “space” to build their homes… Any rain and the house would be dragged down…

    • Altamash Jiwani says:

      Slums on Hills- never seen it in India. I appreciate you brought that up. A cement base/platform can be used to protect from heavy rains and further the bolts can be used to fix the house in place if required. -Altamash Jiwani

  • aline says:

    not attached to the land? hmmm
    You know, most slums here in Brasil are constructed on hills, because that’s the periferic area, where poor people have “space” to build their homes… Any rain and the house would be dragged down…

  • Dayne says:

    Nice, but it doesn't look very "heavy rain friendly"… And as aline mentioned, it needs to be attached to the ground…

  • Dayne says:

    Nice, but it doesn't look very “heavy rain friendly”… And as aline mentioned, it needs to be attached to the ground…

  • Dayne says:

    Nice, but it doesn't look very “heavy rain friendly”… And as aline mentioned, it needs to be attached to the ground…

  • Dayne says:

    Nice, but it doesn't look very “heavy rain friendly”… And as aline mentioned, it needs to be attached to the ground…

  • Nick Bradshaw says:

    I think it is an excellent concept. Provided that when bolted together, the sections become airtight I see no issues with heavy rainfall, but I do agree that hillside usage will require it being anchored to the ground. This is no different to current slum dwellings though, the only difference being that a flat base will need to be carved into the hillside whereas exisitng slums often have sloping floors inside the dwellings.

    Has the project moved to a full sized concept yet or has it possibly even moved beyond that point?

  • Nick Bradshaw says:

    I think it is an excellent concept. Provided that when bolted together, the sections become airtight I see no issues with heavy rainfall, but I do agree that hillside usage will require it being anchored to the ground. This is no different to current slum dwellings though, the only difference being that a flat base will need to be carved into the hillside whereas exisitng slums often have sloping floors inside the dwellings.

    Has the project moved to a full sized concept yet or has it possibly even moved beyond that point?

  • Nick Bradshaw says:

    I think it is an excellent concept. Provided that when bolted together, the sections become airtight I see no issues with heavy rainfall, but I do agree that hillside usage will require it being anchored to the ground. This is no different to current slum dwellings though, the only difference being that a flat base will need to be carved into the hillside whereas exisitng slums often have sloping floors inside the dwellings.

    Has the project moved to a full sized concept yet or has it possibly even moved beyond that point?

  • Hein says:

    I think the idea has merrits although it does not address all the issues related to slum-living. These would include but not limited to security, stability, easy of construction and insulation properties.

    I think I might have a more workable solution that will cover most of these issues at more-or-less the same cost.

Comments are closed.