Addictive Measure

I’m an instant coffee freak for the simple reason that I don’t have the patience to actually roast and brew my cup. But given a moment of insanity, I’d like to be doing the shindig on this fancy Coffee Maker by Tom Metcalfe. The guy makes it almost a ceremonial process of roasting, grinding and brewing of fresh green beans!

Apparently the beans can be roasted to any degree of roast, just to suit your taste. Next the hand-ground beans are brewed in a glass container, which prevents calcification. Enhancing the aromatic qualities and enriching the flavors, folks it’s time to wake up and smell/taste some COFFEE!

Words from the designer:

THE COFFEE MAKER PROCESS

Take 50 green beans.  Roast for 7 minutes for a medium roast, 9 minutes for a dark roast.  Cool beans.  Whilst grinding the cooled beans heat the water until air bubbles begin to pop.  Place ground beans into water.  Stir and brew for 4 minutes.  Then pour and enjoy a cup of fresh perfect coffee.

DESIGN PHILOSOPHY

To achieve genuine sustainability, products must not be temporary or transient.  “My philosophy is to create beautiful pieces of elegant simplicity – which not only have longevity but true lasting value to the user.  My Coffee Maker is designed with this in mind.  It’s a multi-sensory product that is finished in appropriate materials that should endure whilst being enjoyable to use.”

Designer: Tom Metcalfe

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37 Comments

  • I totally agree that there is nothing finer than fresh roasted coffee, I in fact have 2 US utility patents on coffee roasting systems. I have one HUGE question for you tom, what about the smoke and smell. Roasting coffee, to darker levels most prefer produces a huge volume of smoke and a aroma of burning rubber. I watched your vid, and didn’t see any filters, scrubbers or the like. There is also a problem of monitoring, roasting is a non linear event so to go from a medium dark to charcoal can be right quick so with this system you are going to be standing right over it for 10-15 min. Its a pretty piece, and I would get behind it if I knew you had addressed the above issues.

  • Curves says:

    I use a Mr Coffee and a pre-ground (french roast) from a national brand and I have yet to try any “designer” coffee via any brewing technology that tops the taste, price or convenience of it. Call me a coffee pagan, but its my third favorite vice and I am very happy.

  • TheBeege1 says:

    Where and when can I purchase this thing? I wouldn’t use it every day, but it’s definitely worthy of display in the home. Great way to impress your friends too!

  • cossist says:

    As a professional coffee roaster, I wouldn’t suggest brewing coffee that has just been roaster. It needs to get to know itself again. Cool design, but I can’t believe he didn’t go for a vacuum pot.

    • hogwash, utter hogwash, the old degassing and “resting” garbage that roaster foist. There have been a lot of blind taste tests done using pro’s on fresh roast vrs aged and the fresh roast shows (not surprising) all the lighter more delicate flavors (chocolate, tobacco etc) that are absent from “aged”. This is a one of old herring that the “pro” roasters fly to keep roasting a mystery, the other is that its a art. Roasting is science, fresh is best, and its not hard.

      • coffeedude says:

        Gasses are released during the process of roasting and are scientifically proven to continue to produce these gasses that actually deteriate the coffee if not given time to be rested and released of such gasses. Freshness is best and coffee just out of a roaster will still taste good and fresh, but the flavors peak after about 24 hours and decrease after about 5 days. That being said, the idea is clever and definitely beats drinking stale coffee, even if the beans arent rested.

        • Jack Shipley says:

          Agreed. Simple test is to see the uncontrollable bloom in a pour over (or even brewer) of coffee fresh from the roaster versus coffee that's rested for 48 hours. Organic chemistry isn't a foisted myth.

      • coffeedude says:

        Gasses are released during the process of roasting and are scientifically proven to continue to produce these gasses that actually deteriate the coffee if not given time to be rested and released of such gasses. Freshness is best and coffee just out of a roaster will still taste good and fresh, but the flavors peak after about 24 hours and decrease after about 5 days. That being said, the idea is clever and definitely beats drinking stale coffee, even if the beans arent rested.

        • Jack Shipley says:

          Agreed. Simple test is to see the uncontrollable bloom in a pour over (or even brewer) of coffee fresh from the roaster versus coffee that's rested for 48 hours. Organic chemistry isn't a foisted myth.

  • tackett says:

    I’m a designer/builder, and I roast my own coffee.

    First off, the machine is beautiful, although I think he needs a more graceful lighting mechanism to match the beauty of the rest.

    However, there’s a fatal flaw in the whole deal. Freshly roasted coffee has very, very little flavor. Or, um flavour, in this case. It needs to stand for 12-24 hours to reach it’s peak flavor.

    It’s way more flash than function (assuming you like coffee). I’m sure he can sell a ton of them.

    • Henrique Staino says:

      So… what’s the problem in toasting it today and grinding it tomorrow?

  • IrkedAngel says:

    Wow! Finally an American version of the Japanese tea ceremony!

  • Mr. Coffee says:

    This thing takes the ritual of coffee making to a totally new level! I love it!
    The perfect sunday morning ritual.
    It looks great too.

  • this looks greaet, but i don’t see how this could ever be practical lol

  • dorr says:

    Most pleased to see this blog. I once lived in a small coffee producing Oaxacan village. Initially they would dry the fruit on woven mats on a dirt path. They would take their green beans and roast them on a large, round, flat clay “pan”, sort of thing. I don’t recall a “cooling” phase. They would then grind them with a metate used only for coffee. Then they simply tossed the ground coffee into an old enamelled coffee pot of boiling water. They had an idea of just how long to wait for the coffee to be ready. They would then pour the brew into brown earthenware cups. They would chip off a few flakes of sugar from a raw sugar ball and serve. They would repeat whenever they wanted to brew up a few cups of coffee. I still dream about this coffee even after 40 years have passed. It was so good and without any special tools. For them it was niether science or art…just good coffee.

  • what is good about drinking my coffee is drinking it in front of my friends and serve it with my coffee pots and vases.. the best!!

  • RaulJones says:

    There *is* a difference in flavor from fresh roasted and letting it vent (at least 8 hours). Anyone who’s home-roasted *should* know that. And I’ve yet to find a coffee maker that beats my (discontinued) Braun KF-12 4 cup maker, using beans hand-ground in my Zassenhaus mill.

  • London Jack says:

    Very impressive stuff, however I feel that glass roaster will result in burnt taste(there’s no ventilation to let the smoke out.
    Anyway you need to rest freshly roasted coffee for a few days after roast, tastes much better.

  • Jimmy says:

    Greetings! Very helpful advice in this particular article!
    It’s the little changes that will make the largest changes.

    Thanks a lot for sharing!

  • Aw, this was an incredibly nice post. Taking a few minutes and actual effort to generate a super article… butt what can I say…
    I put things off a whole llot and don’t manage to get anythiung done.

Comments are closed.