My Faucet Is Better Than Yours

Your Morning routine: head to the sink, open the tap, water pours down, brush your teeth, and gargle with cup.
My Routine: head to the sink, open Fountain Tab, water flows upwards (with the push of a button), brush my teeth, no cups for gargling…just lap up the water directly from the faucet.
I told you so, my faucet is way too cooler than yours!

Designers: Jin-sun Park & Byungmin Woo

73 Comments

  • mel says:

    not fresh….

  • confucius says:

    And what happens when you have a 80-100 psi (standand) water mains? It doubles as a shower! Anyone seen the rinse toothbrush?

  • roman says:

    it looks cool, but what about the water amount that just flows out, i’d say, rather use ur cup to gargle…

  • VoReason says:

    The problem here is that when you turn on a water fountain, the amount of pressure is determined by the force with which you press the button. With this however, the pressure is controlled by the stick and the button only switches between top or bottom, analogous to a shower or the attachment on the kitchen sink. There is little I can see to solve this problem.

    Also what of children brushing their teeth or an adult shaving his face? With an open hole in the top, one invites particulates into the faucet making it hard to clean and easier to get clogged.

    Good idea, bad execution. The faucet attachments for children that have a hinged bottom and a spout do are as useful as this.

    • M.S.W. says:

      I concur with your concerns (and “confucius” statements on water pressure), the current design doesn’t fully take into account the water pressure issues.

      But, the water pressure issues and control there of can be resolved via proper valve control designs. (Which BTW the designers appear to have neglected to portray/referance in their renders which only show the control button/toggle ) Valve could be either static integration inside the water passage of the spout, or coupled directly to the control toggle switch.

      As for the particulate build-up the surfaces of the inside of the fixture could have coating of either teflon/power coat to provide a nonstick relatively self cleaning (Run water for a moment before using)

  • Pete the plumber says:

    I would forget about the button, and just have it cascade, but it requires a special and expensive filter to align the water like that— this thing would cost well over a grand– and I would go with a rounder , softer sink fixture. Love the design .

  • matt says:

    youve got the good basic idea of having it used as almost a drinking fountain. When I take my allergy meds in the morning i put my head un der the faucet, and yes its annoying….but I do have a feeling you need a water pressure control for the fountain itself apart from the regular faucet.

  • sianz says:

    actually if you guys have noticed.. in the olden days where the tap is just a horizontal pipe with a twist valve attached at the top. that gave the same effect as a fountain anyway. you could use it as an instant shower if you like.

    besides, i find the dual design redundant. why not just use the fountain part? since the water is going to flow down (hello gravity) anyway. it’s going to cut costs and maintenance. hey, how about making a twistable tap head like those auto hand/hair dryers? oh wait, thats already available in the markets.

  • Brendan says:

    Thank god we’ve designed our way out of that ever strenuous neck tilt to drink/gargle from the faucet.

  • C.E. Christman says:

    It has a button that adjusts the water flow… Front, right side. This should keep you from taking that shower.

  • Carl says:

    nice try but a cup does the job just fine. this is over complexity.

    • Yaco says:

      The idea is not to use the cup. less clutter &, in the case of those using paper-plastic cups, less waste. I agree with pete…what do we need the “regular” for? That solves a plenty of issues, such as one handed preassure control and as stated reduces production costs.

      • JoeBee says:

        “less waste”? – Forecasts have indicate that, in the not too distant future, water will be in short supply. It seems like this “fountain” option will lead to a lot more wasting of water!

        • Daniel says:

          How can water be in “short supply”? all the water that has ever been on earth is still on the earth.. a water shortage in a particular area is possible, but not as an overall statement. and with our water treatment plants we have nowadays, the water within a given city is reused over and over again, so a couple extra drops going down the sink is not “waste” it is temporarily used, that will either evaporate and return as rain or will be sent to the water treatment plant to be pumped back into yours or someone else’s house at a later date.
          this is not to say we should not try to cut down on some of that recycling and water movement as general conservation of energy, but as conservation of water… there is no such thing

          • JoeBee says:

            Daniel you write “all the water that has ever been on earth is still on the earth”. Well, that would be true if water vapor couldn’t escape from the atmosphere into space and if H2O molecules were never altered into other compounds. However, a more important point about your statement is that “a water shortage in a particular area is possible” is what people are concerned about. Just yesterday, in my particular area, we were asked to cut back on water usage such as watering lawns and gardens cause of a water shortage. Water is lost from the systems that we have nowadays, for example, it evaporates from reservoirs, lawns and gardens or is lost in the ground, and thus is not available “to be pumped back into yours or someone else’s house at a later date”. In other words, most current systems built so that “water within a given city is reused over and over again”, have losses and are designed with the expectation that these losses will be replaced by rain water. If there is a period of low rainfall, there can be and have been significant water shortages in a particular area.

          • shin says:

            Oh Daniel, where were you in school.

            quote: “so a couple extra drops going down the sink is not “waste” it is temporarily used, that will either evaporate and return as rain or will be sent to the water treatment plant to be pumped back into yours or someone else’s house at a later date.”

            If only the process of this is that quick and simple. Try this method times peoples just in your city alone.

            I ask you, do you have enough water “in-time” for you to use?

            I agree, Good design but not well thought about the impact to:

            1. water conservation

            2. water pressure (if one accidentally flip the control stick too much, one will get wet)

            2. hygienic problem (exposed hole on top)

            3. lifespan of the switch mechanical method before it starts to leak, easily.

  • avisioncame says:

    Yeah… all of the bad stuff above…plus it’s ugly.

  • Robbie says:

    What about hot and cold?

  • rkopke says:

    I love the fell of the water flow! So silky and smooth! But the square shape of the fountain is very brutal… it hurts so bad the concept.
    You have a great product here. I can see it in my WC. But I will have to remodel everything on my WC to be squared as well.
    I can see it better on public places like Food Market Stores and so on.
    I agree with sianz… is there any other need than to wash the hands to have the two ways design?
    I like the upward way much better… I found myself frustrated so many times trying to fit a cup which is longer than the neck. Always having to tilt the cup down or having it half full. This would solve many design like problems.
    Don’t forget the plumbs! 😉

  • Jade Doel says:

    I love designing Taps. I’m an architecture student and when I was in 2nd year we had to design a kitchen from top to bottom, including fittings, lights, cutlery, crockery, materials, pretty much everything you would see or use in the kitchen had to be designed for this project. Since that project I have designed countless taps/faucets and to this day I am somehow fasinated by there mechanics and simplicity.
    I adore your idea, I’d love to see detail drawings of how it fits together and operates.

    Keep it up!

    Jade

  • Cirdain says:

    So someone is washing their hands at high speed the I come in and press the change button.
    Water smashes him in the face and I laugh…

  • Ozhan says:

    My Morning routine: head to the sink, open the tap, water pours down, brush your teeth and move your mouth under the tap, gargle.

  • JAY says:

    Where can I buy it?

  • Skateboard teaching apparatus! Place your foot on our grip tape guidelines that show you exactly how to perform 5 flip tricks. (Ollie-PopShuvit-KickFlip-HeelFlip-VarialFlip)

  • the water is wider than one’s mouth ipso facto water on ckeeks and chin, more out than in. in oz, this design would be impossible because of the water wastage. here, the taps are getting thinner and thinner. a square sink is a horror to keep clean. stuff moulders in the corners where not much water moves, and is hard to winkle out with the sponge. very impractical. and don’t we have enough bloody rectangles in the unnatural world?? the water flow IS pretty, though.

  • Lauren says:

    I think the faucet is beautiful, and so is the shape of the water flow — whether in “fountain” or “waterfall” mode. But as far as drinking directly from it — my dog might like it — but the stream seems a little wide to conveniently drink from. Plus it’s full on in your face, not sideways like a traditional water fountain. Seems like there’s a potential for chin/nose/face wetness that might not work so well. But I’d have to try it … it’s gorgeous anyway.

  • Filipyev says:

    It seems to me that this “waterfall” is to luxury for common people. I’m just thinking about the amout of wasting water… For me – it is unexpectable!

    • M.S.W. says:

      The “Waterfall” effect that this render demonstrates can be achieved using less water than average. Only modification to the design would be the make the waterfall output hole thinner.

  • Daniel says:

    I like the fountain design idea, but I agree with the people who think the regular downward tap is redundant.

    But I’d imagine people would put chewing gum or other nasty stuff in there if it was placed in a public place like a school.

  • bub says:

    IT’S A TAP!!! not tab, tap!

  • royal troll says:

    photoshopped!

  • royal troll says:

    photoshopped!

  • shin says:

    Oh Daniel, where were you in school.
    quote: “so a couple extra drops going down the sink is not “waste” it is temporarily used, that will either evaporate and return as rain or will be sent to the water treatment plant to be pumped back into yours or someone else’s house at a later date.”
    If only the process of this is that quick and simple. Try this method times peoples just in your city alone.
    I ask you, do you have enough water “in-time” for you to use?

    I agree, Good design but not well thought about the impact to:
    1. water conservation
    2. water pressure (if one accidentally flip the control stick too much, one will get wet)
    2. hygienic problem (exposed hole on top)
    3. lifespan of the switch mechanical method before it starts to leak, easily.

  • frank says:

    It looks cool.

  • frank says:

    It looks cool.

  • its excellent and creative design.. I like 🙂

  • Gus says:

    Waste of water

  • mk says:

    doubles as a bathroom flooding machine

  • Cliff says:

    I like the blackflip design, really creative.

  • Neshtoto says:

    LoL, this looks really good and creative. I want such at my home..

  • Alex Leclerq says:

    Thanks for the info. I’ve been looking into calgary plumbing and heating for a while now

  • rkopke says:

    Hey, Happy 4th Design Anniversary! 🙂 Still looks good as when I first saw it. 🙂

  • Dominga says:

    Asking questions are genuinely nice thing if you are not understanding something fully,
    however this piece of writing provides nice understanding even.

Comments are closed.