Subatomic Table

Inspired by quantum physics, the Quantum table is an interpretation of what the movement or path of subatomic particles might look like. The lacquered orange corian top is supported in sharp contrast by the turbulent flux of the hand formed steel wire base in powder-coated black.

Designer: Jason Phillips

15 Comments

  • steve says:

    What’s the point? I don’t want my foot getting tangled up in the table. So dumb, beyond words. If it were made of nitinol and could be heated up into a tiny shape for easy transport, then that’d be a great design, but the chaotic shape is laughably sub-optimal. Another inferior design. Pedestal tables are the best way to raise a surface yet, let’s innovate in that direction, not in this design-evolutionary dead-end. This is modern art-ish BS. Keep it on 2D, to minimize its damage. It’s bad enough we have Frank Gehry screwing up 3D space. Create order, not chaos.

  • Jason says:

    That creepy smile… Hahaha.

  • Akon says:

    I find your comment of very little use as it only reflects your narrow minded view on industrial design. Not every design product has to be the optimal solution and an evolutionary leap foreward in functionality. The Phillip Starck Juicy Salif is an example of just that. Impossible to use but stunning to look at. Jason Phillips has created an interesting and beautiful table with aesthetics that outweigh the lack of functional supremacy. And might I suggest that if you often experience problems with feet getting tangled up in furniture try sitting still..

  • Akon says:

    I find steves comment of very little use as it only reflects his narrow minded view on industrial design. Not every design product has to be the optimal solution and an evolutionary leap foreward in functionality. The Phillip Starck Juicy Salif is an example of just that. Impossible to use but stunning to look at. Jason Phillips has created an interesting and beautiful table with aesthetics that outweigh the lack of functional supremacy. And might I suggest that if you often experience problems with feet getting tangled up in furniture try sitting still..

  • steve says:

    “if you often experience problems with feet getting tangled up in furniture try sitting still”

    Maybe it should be made of razor wire… the whole point is that a table is a raised surface. Period. That’s what it is. There are plenty of ways to do that, but only a few optimal, efficient ways. It’s the long tail of design that I constructively criticize, the multitude of “unique” novelties that only separate rich fools from their money (a praise-worthy task). The best so far is a pedestal like Saarinen’s tulip table. Technically, wheels could be hexagonal or octagonal… or perhaps even square, but what’s the point? “Tolerate the bumps”, you’d say. No doubt the designer is creative, I just see it as reinventing the wheel with a non-circle shape.

  • MDesigns says:

    Wow, Steve! You sound like some of my hard A** teachers at art school some time ago. I would love to have this Quantum table in my house if I could afford it, just because it counters your “optimal and efficient” point of view. I hate it when people try to put design in a box. You could hate it or love it, but don’t push your narrow point of view on us. If you want to live with that simple Tulip table, go ahead knock yourself out.

  • Akon says:

    ” the whole point is that a table is a raised surface. Period.”

    I think it is important to have such an idealistic view on the importance of functionality, nevertheless you seem to exclude any role aesthetic value might play in the overall perception of a product. It is important for a table to function as a raised surface (and from the looks of it the “subatomic table” does just that) but the majority of consumers take aesthetics into account and often base their choise on this parameter. There is a reason why people buy Alfa Romeos even though they break down more often than VW and do fewer km/L. Square wheels.. I would not say “Tolerate the bumps” but instead “Tolerate the bumps if the combined end result of appearence and lack of functionality gives you a positive emotionel response.”

  • rbuss says:

    Steve, your point is far off the mark. Who even says that this is a table for sitting at? People have lots of tables to hold other things. The result of a design process often has a lot to do with the starting point. Optimize for material usage and you get a suboptimal production process. Hanging a table uses less material than a pedestal and offers the most room for your feet, if those are your primary goals. You’ll then have to contend with other issues. Even if I do see difficulties in manufacturing this table, it is certainly not “so dumb, beyond words”.

  • Hi Jason,

    Wonderful table, is it somewhere in Europe to buy it and under which price?

    best

    Aleksandar

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