Analog Cooling of Interior Spaces

How would you like to be able to cool your house (assuming you live in a part of the world where it gets hot enough to need cooling) without the use of electricity at all, whatsoever? What if instead of using electric power to stay cool in your home all day, all you had to do was run a bit of cold water in the morning? It appears that designers Mey kahn and Boaz Kahn have transported an ancient secret into the now that’ll do just that, and with a fantastically lovely bit of interior design as a conduit.

The design we’re speaking of here is ECOoler, a sort of tile system that connects via water hose nozzles, creating a grid of essentially natural coolers that work by evaporating water. The aesthetics are brought to the project by one of the two traditional Middle-Eastern reference points used in this project: the Mashrabiya, an architectural element that acts as mediator between the inside and the outside. This takes the form of a clay or cement brick that allows air to travel in whilst continuing to keep all manner of uninvited guests out. In the ECOoler, the Mashrabiya is molded and made into a tube system that takes another important cue from a Middle-Eastern tradition: the Jara.

What the Jara is and has been for a very long time is a jug that holds cooling water that works by evaporating and seeping through the clay it is made of. Because this method is much closer to what some might call a “natural” method, you’re brought many steps further into responsibility in eco-living, allowing you to live in harmony with your environment. Lovely idea, yes?

Designers: Mey kahn and Boaz Kahn

Shares 87.0K

35 Comments

  • Fantastic idea! I like it.

  • nice says:

    Look out for Joris Laarman… He did this years ago

  • nice says:

    Look out for Joris Laarman… He did this years ago

  • Alf says:

    I saw this some times ago on another website, but I still don’t get it.
    How do they manage to create these empty tubes? To me, if you use a mould I don’t see why there should be empty space in the middle …

    • Shaun says:

      Two halves.

    • dror says:

      it is made from a ceramic material, with a little understanding in ceramic plaster molding you will surely know that the ceramic dries out slowly in a way that you cay drain it out leaving only an outer shell

    • Ian says:

      Slip casting using a two piece mold. Slip is liquid clay. When poured into a plaster mold, the moisture in the slip is absorbed by the plaster, sucking the clay against the mold. A short time later, depending on the thickness desired, the excess slip is poured out and the remaining clay allowed to dry.

  • Alf says:

    I saw this some times ago on another website, but I still don’t get it.
    How do they manage to create these empty tubes? To me, if you use a mould I don’t see why there should be empty space in the middle …

    • Shaun says:

      Two halves.

    • dror says:

      it is made from a ceramic material, with a little understanding in ceramic plaster molding you will surely know that the ceramic dries out slowly in a way that you cay drain it out leaving only an outer shell

    • Ian says:

      Slip casting using a two piece mold. Slip is liquid clay. When poured into a plaster mold, the moisture in the slip is absorbed by the plaster, sucking the clay against the mold. A short time later, depending on the thickness desired, the excess slip is poured out and the remaining clay allowed to dry.

  • tris.d says:

    i dont think you connect them all up. i assume theyre screwed on the crosstubes but it doesnt show on your prototypes. but then, that is one brittle wall.

  • tris.d says:

    i dont think you connect them all up. i assume theyre screwed on the crosstubes but it doesnt show on your prototypes. but then, that is one brittle wall.

    • Sue says:

      It not supposed to act as a wall. Its more of a privacy screen really so that the people inside the home can enjoy their view of the outside without everybody else ogling them.

  • Potter says:

    As a concept it is an interesting idea. Nice stylising of the design and good craftsmanship in executing the prototype.

    Would like to see a resolved solution for connecting each tile, obviously a screw thread will not suffice (interference occurring during assembly).

    Also it would be beneficial to find out how much water is ‘lost’ through the evaporation. I imagine that water would be a precious commodity in places where this sort of infrastructure could be used.

  • Potter says:

    As a concept it is an interesting idea. Nice stylising of the design and good craftsmanship in executing the prototype.
    Would like to see a resolved solution for connecting each tile, obviously a screw thread will not suffice (interference occurring during assembly).
    Also it would be beneficial to find out how much water is ‘lost’ through the evaporation. I imagine that water would be a precious commodity in places where this sort of infrastructure could be used.

  • LIMEBLUE says:

    Can we buy this?

  • LIMEBLUE says:

    Can we buy this?

  • nakins says:

    This is cooling by evaporation. Water seeps out of very very tiny pores in the ceramic. When it hits dry air, the water evaporates, cooling the air. A "swamp cooler" does the same thing. This will only work in areas with very low humidity. In the south east part of the US, it would just make a mess.

  • nakins says:

    This is cooling by evaporation. Water seeps out of very very tiny pores in the ceramic. When it hits dry air, the water evaporates, cooling the air. A “swamp cooler” does the same thing. This will only work in areas with very low humidity. In the south east part of the US, it would just make a mess.

  • Max says:

    That is a really cool idea, but would such a wall/window be durable enough? Im not thinking of somebody trying to break in, more of every day things as leaning against it or children playing and bumping into it.

    Another thing id be concerned about is that in most countries in which it is hot and dry enough to use such a system the water quality is rather low. Wouldnt the impurities in the water stay in the system and close up the pores? If thats the case then the system could only be run with distilled water which has to come from somewhere and would probably require electrical energy or some sort of filters to be produced.

  • Max says:

    That is a really cool idea, but would such a wall/window be durable enough? Im not thinking of somebody trying to break in, more of every day things as leaning against it or children playing and bumping into it.

    Another thing id be concerned about is that in most countries in which it is hot and dry enough to use such a system the water quality is rather low. Wouldnt the impurities in the water stay in the system and close up the pores? If thats the case then the system could only be run with distilled water which has to come from somewhere and would probably require electrical energy or some sort of filters to be produced.

  • Sarah says:

    Wow it’s really beautiful simple and marvelous I want u too c my project too: http://www.yankodesign.com/2011/01/27/true-hospital-comfort-zone/

  • Sarah says:

    Wow it’s really beautiful simple and marvelous I want u too c my project too: http://www.yankodesign.com/2011/01/27/true-hospit

  • Ly82nX says:

    Amazing design,
    i think it is a great idea for GREEN building design.
    special mechanical fittings would be a good idea to avoid structural weakness when constructing a full wall Msharabia.

  • Iph4x says:

    Amazing design,
    i think it is a great idea for GREEN building design.
    special mechanical fittings would be a good idea to avoid structural weakness when constructing a full wall Msharabia.

  • Pingback: KASTORMAG:
  • Shope says:

    This is some great idea about cooling of interior. Nice and innovative ideas.

Comments are closed.