One Liter Limited

1ℓimit faucet looks more like an elegant test tube inverted on top of a tap. The glass tube holds exactly one liter of water, sufficient for a quick handwash. The theory being that we waste almost six liters of water and use only one, while washing hands. Once the stored one-liter is used up, you have to turn-off the tap till the next one liter fills up the tube. A cumbersome rationing process that will hopefully drive home the point of conservation!

Designers: Yonggu Do, Dohyung Kim & Sewon Oh

184 Comments

  • nooooooooo says:

    Shaving? How does it know if you want hot or cold? Sorry, this is a dumb idea.

    • Toast says:

      You're dumb. If you look at the pictures, you can see that the placement of this faucet would be in a public restroom. Who shaves in the restroom? As for temperature, it wouldn't take much to put in a point of use water heater. You shouldn't be washing your hands with cold water anyway.

      My suggestion as an improvement, remove the handle, and make it activated by motion sensor, both to improve the form factor as well as to remove the contact between washer/faucet, so as to minimize spread of germs.

  • s.r. says:

    parts of this faucet that aren't phallic: 0%

  • s.r. says:

    parts of this faucet that aren't phallic: 0%

  • johnnyboi says:

    What is so bad about wasting water anyway?

  • johnnyboi says:

    What is so bad about wasting water anyway?

  • Peter C says:

    This would work well in the home/bathroom. In fact, I visited the site wnating to buy these, but couldn't find any trace of them there..pity.

    Also, it would be a nice touch if they added LEDs to these..red and blue..for hot and cold water, so the water is colored either when it runs or/and when it is stored in the tube. It would add to the great “look” in general.

    Hope they offer these for sale some time soon.

  • Peter C says:

    One other point I forgot to mention in my post above..it's not really clear from the discription given, but do you need to use the full tube of water..or can you just use, say, half of it..and, if so, would the tube then fill..or do yo have to use the full liter before it will refill?

    Something like these are really needed..and will be in the future, as more and more places start to restrict and meter the use of water in both the home and business. Could really help folks to actually see how much it is costing them, if it is charged by the liter.

  • pootpoot says:

    You'd have zero water pressure. Not very helpful when you want to wash your hands.

  • John says:

    Great render, elegant form….irritating concept.

    Motion sensors, for now, are the best solution to the water wasting issue. This concept creates a frustrating situation. What happens when I run out of the liter of water and my hands/forearms are still dirty, sudsy, etc? Do I switch to another sink to wash my child’s hands? I find the concept patronizing. It assumes I’m not self reliant/responsible enough to handle water usage.

    I know some of you might ask, “why would you need more than a liter?” to which I would reply, as a designer, you need to keep every scenario in mind. This is fundamental.

  • John says:

    Great render, elegant form….irritating concept.

    Motion sensors, for now, are the best solution to the water wasting issue. This concept creates a frustrating situation. What happens when I run out of the liter of water and my hands/forearms are still dirty, sudsy, etc? Do I switch to another sink to wash my child’s hands? I find the concept patronizing. It assumes I’m not self reliant/responsible enough to handle water usage.

    I know some of you might ask, “why would you need more than a liter?” to which I would reply, as a designer, you need to keep every scenario in mind. This is fundamental.

    • Guest says:

      Most people are not self reliant/responsible enough to handle water usage, thus the need for water monitoring. If most people cold manage their consumption, we wouldn't be in the predicament we are in now, would we?

  • nfnd says:

    Well, it would only take 5 seconds to fill up. Not much of a wait.

  • nfnd says:

    Well, it would only take 5 seconds to fill up. Not much of a wait.

  • People like it when there is water pressure running through their hands.

    • dur says:

      People probably alos like clean water, and if we keep putting our wants above the reality, we simply won't have any clean water. The fact is, we need to be regulated and stop putting our pleasure above our survival.

  • katrina says:

    very creative!! fun good way to save water!

  • Oh wow!!! by far the nicest one i have seen. i love how it holds the water visible. great stuff.

  • Oh wow!!! by far the nicest one i have seen. i love how it holds the water visible. great stuff.

  • nick chan says:

    this is very good design for save the world, if any who care the world, very good design!

  • Mystikan says:

    It probably has a float-and-cutoff valve similar to the one in your toilet cistern, so when the water reaches a certain level it cuts off. While the valve isn’t visible in the clear section, it would probably be contained below the tap, such that it would cut off when a certain pressure is reached.

  • Mystikan says:

    It probably has a float-and-cutoff valve similar to the one in your toilet cistern, so when the water reaches a certain level it cuts off. While the valve isn’t visible in the clear section, it would probably be contained below the tap, such that it would cut off when a certain pressure is reached.

  • poogermfreak says:

    I don't think that water could possibly be hot enough to properly sterilize your hands. yuck.

  • ZeaS says:

    This is an amazing idea!

  • enviro consultant says:

    Classic example of green consumerism. Everyone's time would be better spent lobbying their governments for strict caps on greenhouse gas emissions – that's the defining challenge. First world water supplies are not even endangered here in the American Southwest, and I certainly don't see anyone running to install these in India where the real problems are. One of the great lies of modern marketing is that you – yes, you – as an individual, can actually make a difference. You can't (excepting the obvious benefit of not procreating). Certainly not by buying new faucets, which were mined and smelted and forged and then shipped to your door from some lonely coal-using country with no worker's rights like China. The only impact we can have as individual is in real political action that results in massive government intervention into our environmental problems – and that happens in a group, when we stop mooning over crap to pie and start joining together to demand environmental justice.

    Beyond the obvious silliness of the concept, there is a serious design flaw here. This isn't enough water to properly clean one's hands – 15 seconds of run time and hard scrubbing is necessary to do so. Especially with the absence of any kind of water pressure – this is just a gravity drip into the sink. All the additional water used to power the turbines or cool the reactors to make those flu and cold medicines will certainly counteract whatever meager gains you get from this. Install a $1.50 low flow aerator on your existing sink and get on with making real change.

    Looks pretty though. But sustainability is rarely a zero sum game.

  • egenergy says:

    It seems like a really cute idea, but I have trouble imagining it's applications…

  • egenergy says:

    It seems like a really cute idea, but I have trouble imagining it's applications…

  • Rahul Shirbhate says:

    i agree…

  • Rahul Shirbhate says:

    i agree…

  • Guest says:

    Good in theory. Phallic looking in application

  • Guest says:

    Good in theory. Phallic looking in application

  • I think it’s a great idea, but what about when you are doing more than just washing your hands? is there an override switch?

  • jane says:

    hahaha my first thought too!

  • jj says:

    well a hole would vent properly, but it would have to be set up in a way that doesn’t allow water through. this is why engineer dudes work on projects like this – to solve those problems. seemingly though, it works. so don’t worry about it ^^

  • As long as it’s only in use where the water never has time to get cold.

  • sam says:

    you illiterate retard go lose some more brain cells

  • Republic of Canada says:

    Seems a little fascistic too me.

  • David says:

    About a year ago I started thinking I was using a lot of water and energy to heat it by waiting for the hot water to get to the tap, so I started making a conscious effort to wash my hands with cold water (which isn’t all that cold by the way when it first starts to run, just room temp). I have since found it works just fine to use cold water, its the act of scrubbing and rinsing that gets hands clean, not the extra temp, that’s just for comfort I’ve found. And now that I’m used to it, its perfectly fine really. And besides saving on water and energy, it takes less time.

  • sophie_k says:

    interesting concept 🙂 i imagine it to be highly frustrating though, bit of soap left on your hand for example. What about emergencies? say somebody gets burnt or something harmful on their skin or in there eye? lets just sit around and wait for a damn tube to fill up while they go blind 🙂 silly.

  • mattymays says:

    hi http://www.yankodesign.com-ers merry xmas to all of you – matt-mays

  • Faggot says:

    Uhhh, I’ve been late and had to shave in a public restroom before. Also, “it wouldn’t take much…” isn’t the same as “it has!” It’s almost like saying… “Well, it wouldn’t take much to make airplane seats with more leg room,” as a justification of current airline seats.

    You sir, are a complete and utter idiot.

  • Faggot says:

    What happens when you accidentally use too much soap and end up with soap hands, due to not enough water?

  • Jai says:

    Lovely way to save the world…

  • Ricardo says:

    Nice and inteligent

  • Tom says:

    This looks great but I don’t think it’s a very good water saving idea. I doubt anyone really uses more than a litre washing their hands at any sink. Even if there is a way to stop the flow, people would probably just leaving it running to stop itself. Nice concept though.

  • TJ says:

    Interesting concept. It’s a great way to make people more aware of how much water they consume.

  • Dan says:

    Sometimes we have to do away with some of the “ammenities of life” in order to be conscious of how we are treating our planet. If you are only using one liter of water, instead of six, maybe you can deal with the temperature not being quite to your standard.

  • Shapewear says:

    I was wondering how the air from the tube would escape when the water fills up the tube.

  • Billy B says:

    Which way do you turn the lever to enable the bong?

  • pablo says:

    HOW CAN I BUY?

  • nekro says:

    I think It just can´t work the way its is designed, if the water in glass is merely decorative, it could be more functional to use another type of valve to control 1 liter, the air cant escape, maybe compress

    Re:

    I was wondering how the air from the tube would escape when the water fills up the tube.

Comments are closed.