Never Miss the Key Hole

Lost in the dark! That’s usually what happens when you get home from a long day of working, skateboarding, drinking, whatever! It’s dark outside, you wanna get into your house, but by golly if it isn’t the most difficult thing in the world to get that key aligned with the key hole in order to insert and turn! Here’s the key to this problem. The “V Lock.” It’s got a v. You put the key in the v. You open the door. Perfect.

I think you’ll understand this concept in basically 0 seconds. It’s just that obvious. Props to designer Junjie Zhang for making the world a more intuitive place, one lock at a time.

Designer: Junjie Zhang

V Lock for easy finding of the keyhole by Junjie Zhang

vlock02

182 Comments

  • jinx says:

    There would be 2 main issues here in the northwest of USA. First water would get into the lock, so it would have to be mounted upside down to prevent the water from getting inside. And secondly it often snows and have freezing rain which would freeze up the lock. Again turning it upside-down would prevent this from happening, while still making it easy to use.

  • jinx says:

    There would be 2 main issues here in the northwest of USA. First water would get into the lock, so it would have to be mounted upside down to prevent the water from getting inside. And secondly it often snows and have freezing rain which would freeze up the lock. Again turning it upside-down would prevent this from happening, while still making it easy to use.

  • sarasa says:

    Oh, yes! we're clearly in the presence of geniuses ¬¬

  • sarasa says:

    Oh, yes! we're clearly in the presence of geniuses

  • @dali_a says:

    very clever! good job 🙂

  • @dali_a says:

    very clever! good job 🙂

  • Goose says:

    Excellent when i get drunk

  • Goose says:

    Excellent when i get drunk

  • MikeT says:

    Like the idea…seen something similar at Reichsburg castle (Mosel, Germany). See "original" design at: http://www.flickr.com/photos/vanderhoorn/49957236

  • MikeT says:

    Like the idea…seen something similar at Reichsburg castle (Mosel, Germany). See “original” design at: http://www.flickr.com/photos/vanderhoorn/49957236

  • Allie says:

    First thought – Looks like a vagina
    Second thought – It's called the v-lock. Reinforces first thought.
    Third thought – is it really that hard to put a key into a lock?
    Forth thought – maybe if you're drunk. Constantly drunk enough to purchase one.

  • Allie says:

    First thought – Looks like a vagina
    Second thought – It's called the v-lock. Reinforces first thought.
    Third thought – is it really that fucking hard to put a key into a lock?
    Forth thought – maybe if you're drunk. Constantly drunk enough to purchase one.

  • David says:

    I'm a locksmith, and a simple fix to be any sort of drain hole to disallow water to collect at the bottom point.

    While indeed a clever design, getting it to retrofit any of the standard 2 1/8" cylindrical locks commonly used in the US would be somewhat of a challenge, due to their different lengths between the door and the face of the cylinder.

    For those concerned with someone twisting the lock out, the retrofit would merely have to have a free spinning design. Any lock that conforms to UL437 standards, or grade 1, are already tested for prying, twisting and punching.

    The lock would see tremendous application to many storefronts, or exterior locks equipped with mortise cylinders, since their cylinder diameters are all standardized.

    The lock is indeed worth exploring, especially for Schlage Primus. I cannot count the number of times I've had customers complain about the troubles they have had with aligning the key properly to allow insertion. An excellent lock, but troublesome for many of the elderly.

  • David says:

    I'm a locksmith, and a simple fix to be any sort of drain hole to disallow water to collect at the bottom point.

    While indeed a clever design, getting it to retrofit any of the standard 2 1/8″ cylindrical locks commonly used in the US would be somewhat of a challenge, due to their different lengths between the door and the face of the cylinder.

    For those concerned with someone twisting the lock out, the retrofit would merely have to have a free spinning design. Any lock that conforms to UL437 standards, or grade 1, are already tested for prying, twisting and punching.

    The lock would see tremendous application to many storefronts, or exterior locks equipped with mortise cylinders, since their cylinder diameters are all standardized.

    The lock is indeed worth exploring, especially for Schlage Primus. I cannot count the number of times I've had customers complain about the troubles they have had with aligning the key properly to allow insertion. An excellent lock, but troublesome for many of the elderly.

  • Kebin says:

    All we need now is little push pins on keys to designate which key it is, (the reason they are pins are not preset is, so don't if you lose them people can't just figure out "Oh hey this is someone's car/house key " ) so it would be even easier to travel in the dark

  • Kebin says:

    All we need now is little push pins on keys to designate which key it is, (the reason they are pins are not preset is, so don't if you lose them people can't just figure out “Oh hey this is someone's car/house key ” ) so it would be even easier to travel in the dark

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  • Andrew says:

    Hehe, will great for drank guys 🙂
    anyway – good tech style, thanks.
    btw, you always can check my blog at <a target="_blank" href="http://www.script-tutorials.com/">script tutorials too

  • Andrew says:

    Hehe, will great for drank guys 🙂
    anyway – good tech style, thanks.
    btw, you always can check my blog at script tutorials too

  • I was just complaining about that very problem, here: http://www.happycomplainer.com/2011/02/on-opening… Thanks for a nice solution!

  • Now that would be a cool way of putting the key in the V!!

  • Now that would be a cool way of putting the key in the V!!

  • looool ! I think my neighbor could need that because one day he was trying to open the door with his mp3 player headphones.. But perhaps it’s another problem :S

  • Great blog article.Really looking forward to read more. Really Cool.

  • Gournia says:

    No. It has not effect on the tumblers because they are internal, similar to how painting a car doesn’t change the engine.

  • Funny Pics says:

    No way, this is funny

  • art says:

    i do it every time im drunk and cant get into my house……then i usually creawl through the window and take a nap infront of it hahaha

  • got-it says:

    I saw this and my only real thought was Nobel Prize

  • Hello! I’ve been following your web site for a long time now and finally got the courage to go ahead and give you a shout out from Dallas Texas! Just wanted to tell you keep up the excellent job!

  • Beautifully simple design. So refined. The inventor is a keen guy.

  • I love to see very interesting designs like these. It makes me think that we have not come close to inventing the most amazing things that we will see. Excited for the future

  • Volker says:

    The idea is not exactly new. I have seen medieval keyholes with a V-shaped funnel on the keyplates für the same purpose – currently just can’t find the pictures.

    Great re-discovery/re-design, though.

Comments are closed.