Armadillo Head Protection

A helmet that’s made to protect your head with the intelligent design of thousands of years of animal evolution. The armadillo (aka the Tatoo) has not one large shell, but many little plates for protecting it’s hide from danger. The Tatoo helmet uses not one giant piece of plastic and foam to protect the head, but many little ones, protection provided courtesy of EPP : expanded polypropylene.

Rapid assembly, low cost of production. The helmet stores flat for a fantastic improvement over the current standard for helmets, which are bigger than a head. Just unfold, clip each piece together, and slap it on the head! The entire helmet is made of polypropylene and can break down into entirely separate pieces for ease in recycling – or if you’re feeling really hipster that day, up-cycling.

Where do I sign up? I don’t even wear a helmet when I bicycle now (this is a very dangerous thing to do, I don’t recommend it,) but if these came out, I’d certainly be apt!

Materials: poplypropylene, polypropylene foam
Designed with Patrice Mouille

Designer: Julien Bergignat

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Tatoo Bicycle Helmet by Julien Bergignat

24 Comments

  • Very nice design, also very usefull. I’m a big fan of snowboarding but only whear my helmet when I really need to (in the funpark or off piste). I can pack this helmet in my back pack when I don’t need it. If this design is incorporated in a nice back pack, the unfolded helmet can also be used as a backprotactor.

    Love the simplicity.

  • SkyWay says:

    Made some research before bashing this 😛 The result? It’s actually a good concept. An armadillo has those layers for mobility, so this kinda design could have something a rigid helmet does not, making it behave like the scalp during impacts. But that has been taken away by making it from a single sheet, instead of multiple sheets. Then, nice techy words used there, like the EPP. That’s the foam, the best impact absorber in the polypropylene line, but why is there so little of it when it’s obviously the only thing keeping the damage away from your precious little head? Finishing up, I do hope the designers have coated this with proper anti-UV stuff, as it appears polypropylene is highly suspect to cracks and structural damage when exposed to sunlight. Something I would not like my rigid helmet, which I hook to my backpack for carrying by the way, to do.

  • mif991 says:

    Sorry to disagree with above statements; although I like the concept, there has been no testing of any kind done with this. Please run some impact tests and publish them. Otherwise this remains an untrustworthy product.

  • I can see a design like this could have great potential in commercial applications (if it stands up to standard testing) for things like bicycle sharing services, particularly in places like australia where helmets must be worn due to legislation.

    • mif991 says:

      Hi AvidDesigner, I saw the other “helmet” and I was horrified at the complementary comments. Things like these have to be tested for impact and protection. Leaving it to aesthetic criticism is just wrong. Thanks for posting it though.

  • Chris says:

    It’s an interesting idea, but I don’t see how it can be too effective. There’s just not enough there to really provide good impact protection.

  • iu says:

    it’s not safe even though it’s convience

  • Nornan says:

    Is there a template for this helmet, would be a cool thing for parties or team building… or just cheap advertising…

  • Its a neat concept, but even if it does pass all the required tests, it doesn’t look safe visually. The sheet looks very thin, and also the connection looks like it would pop off with a small impact. Instead of having all of the ribs flat, bend them inward to give more visual thickness, and as stated before, add fill it with more foam. The connector should also be designed more like a nut, or harness which has a greater locking capability.

  • Hunter says:

    how is this better than the helmet that girl in garden state wore? i think they’re for rugby:

    http://www2.foxsearchlight.com/gardenstate/gallery/pict_2_1280x960.jpg

  • tentakel says:

    Hmm…very similar to this concept…

    http://tiny.cc/n9Yys

  • Nick says:

    I think it has great feature

    Features

    • Protection against high velocity particles, splashing materials, molten metal and hot solids resistance
    • Suitable for outdoor use
    • Unique moulded visor incorporates chin protection, allows comfortable use of neckband earmuffs
    • Lightweight design
    • Adjustable ratchet harness

    great design..thanks for sharing..

  • Nick says:

    I think it has great feature

    Features

    • Protection against high velocity particles, splashing materials, molten metal and hot solids resistance
    • Suitable for outdoor use
    • Unique moulded visor incorporates chin protection, allows comfortable use of neckband earmuffs
    • Lightweight design
    • Adjustable ratchet harness

    great design..thanks for sharing..

  • Flow says:

    There is a reason for one large shell at helmets instead of many small ones…statics!
    Some firm try to produce helmets with a 3d weaving technology to get ONE seamless shell because this is the strongest construction for helmets you can get.

  • Flow says:

    There is a reason for one large shell at helmets instead of many small ones…statics!
    Some firm try to produce helmets with a 3d weaving technology to get ONE seamless shell because this is the strongest construction for helmets you can get.

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