Prison Diary Online

For a moment the news of Brit prisoners on home leave being handed out Viagra made me crack up, but once I understood the psychology behind it, I was more compassionate. It’s very vital to keep prisoners in the “right frame of mind” and creative writing can be a good outlet. The P:log is a secured random blogging system for prisoners that keeps the author anonymous, but family members and mentors are allowed to identify and communicate with the author. Agreed cryptic messages could be handed out in this system, but I guess if we restrict it to the non hardcore offenders, not much harm would come of it.

Designer: Yejin Mun

P:log – Blog System For Prisoners by Yejin Mun





    • Phdeartworm says:

      Seriously, do tax payers need to pay so that criminals can update their blog?? I like the one show I saw where the inmates where forced to live outdoors in a tent city. They where forced to work for like a dollar a day so that they could buy their own meals. Which consisted of bologna sandwiches. I think it was on like Cops or something…

      • Anne says:

        Tent City is in AZ. It's part of the Maricopa County Correctional Facilities. People get mad at Sheriff Joe Arpaio for keeping prisoners there, and for making them work/pay for their food… but it keeps people from offending again! (BTW, if people are too poor or can't work, they still get fed.)

        On holidays, they do get holiday food… but it's still made very inexpensively. Something like $0.75/inmate. Saves the taxpayers a ton of money.

    • jdale says:

      I don’t think the blogging environment is going to be healthy for prisoners. You get the people who flame them for being criminals, the people who use them to pass coded messages in and out of prison, and those weird women who think they can “save” them somehow. They’re probably better off isolated.

    • iamnomad says:

      Solitary confinement. Period.

      If kids know that prison is a cakewalk, then they won’t give a care about committing crimes. Scared Straight should be shown to all kids and new programs should keep being introduced about the horrors of prison life.

    • ImmaLion says:

      In Brazil, we’d call this a “communication device for criminals to stay active and working with their criminal organizations”.

      Currently they use cellphones, which is better considering most of them don’t know how to read/write anyways.

      I think the designer is missing the part where criminals are put in jail to isolate them from their crime mobs.

      It’s not just about punishment.

      • Andre Ribeiro says:

        Oh yeah, this must be the worst idea ever man!!!
        The cell phone activity from inside correctional system in Brazil grants the thugs a way to command the criminal company with ease. Many times grand criminal operations, including the raids of attacks to police officers where dictated by this tech.

    • Frigg says:

      Seems like a nice enough idea.

      That is, until a ruthless blogging magnate uses it to enslave his army of bloggers and force them to churn out more than 60 posts in a 24 hour period, generating endlessly witty descriptions of new products, rumors, speculation, patent applications, spy shots, and analysis of executive flatulence leading up to major product announcements…

    • Curves says:

      It was my understanding that prisoners do not have internet access. I dont wish to judge them all, but, I fear its just another way to commit crime. If indeed they do have, or are granted access, I hope they are marked as prisoners, like their outgoing mail and telephone calls are.

    • Dr.Evil Genius says:

      Prisons are supposed to be for rehabilitation and for too many prisoners, the prison system serves to debilitate inmates.

      Remember that many prisoners do not get “25-years-to-life” and do get released everyday.

      Why make their return to society more difficult? It will only make life tougher for everyone they come across [that they don’t kill] so ideas like this seem positive to me.

      I have seen programs on some European prisons and the dudes there tend to be less violent and less likely to escape during their sentence or return to prison upon release. Those prisons treat them like human beings and the result appears to be more positive than the results we get here on a regular basis.

    • Brazell says:

      Probably wouldn’t be given to the most violent criminals, but I’d have to think that this is a bad idea regardless. As it is now, gang leaders in prisons order hits on people on the inside and outside by a complex messaging system that may or may not eventually make it to the outside and then the murder is committed … I don’t think that we need to give them the ability to broadcast those messages on the internet.

      Also, for inmates convicted of violent crimes (while I am sure that most people wouldn’t want to give them the right to blog in prison), it’s another way to potentially torment their victims. The victims do not need to read the blog entries, but at the same time, why even bother giving somebody that chance?

    • Channa Support says:

      I think it’s a decent idea. A few years takes forever to go by even for me. I couldn’t imagine being in prison for a few years with nothing to do and no one to talk to for making a mistake.

      Excluding rapists and murderers. Put them in a straightjacket and completely keep them from contacting the outside world.

    • Callie says:

      Anyone else notice how many misspelled words there are on the advertisement? Maybe its a joke?

    • Jimmy C says:

      Lemme ask you haters a question. If you were a prisoner who honestly missed his family because you’d barely seen them throughout the last five years, how would you feel about this design?

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