A Bike Who Hates Lowriding

Lemme do a quiz on you, bikers. How well do you love gravity? Not? I really hate it man, it’s terrible. So here’s the thing: you’re in luck. There’s a bike right here that defies it. Like a standard rebel. It’s called “Flying Bike” and it’s quite the magnetic levitator. By using the impetus of the bicycle, power is generated and magnetism brings the back of the bike up, up, up, until the gear is literally in the center of the back wheel, unconnected by anything other than the powers of the magnet.

The the magnet is strong! Kinetic energy brings the back of the bike upward as speed increases. This allows for decreased wind resistance and absorption of impact from bumps, stones, squirrels, etc.

But wait, isn’t that a sort of gear situation I see on the back wheel? Does that become dissipated once the bike goes fast enough to lift off the ground? Yes! There is a point where the force changes. This is similar to what happens in the front, but with a much smaller gear.

The biker’s gonna have to get used to this sort of situation.

Flying’s always a sort of “learning experience.”

Designers: Hoyoung Lee, Youngwoo Park, and Jungmin Park

Flying Bike that uses gravity and probably magic by Hoyoung Lee, Youngwoo Park, and Jungmin Park

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59 Comments

  • Gunnar Tveiten says:

    Ouch, the english, it HURTS. I know not everyone is a native, hell english is my third language, but this is damn-near incomprehencible.

    Other than that: This bike doesn’t consider physics relevant, but we’re used to that, I guess.

  • Confucius says:

    Wow. This ones gonna get a few comments. Park, Park and Lee prepare yourselves. Where do I start…

    Design: The bike cannot turn due to the handlebars hitting the chassis, even if they worked the pivot position is unnatural, leading the driver to overcorrect too often. The seat position is far too high in respect to the handlebars, the seat is unadjustable. The sharp and jagged handlebars don’t complement the rest of the form, which looks like something that Dr Zeus, and Mr Garrison co-designed.

    Mechanics: This size of the magnets are too small to hold a dog let alone an average ape, even if they’ re turning in series. Even worse, there is NO supporting framework to stop the wheel(s) from flying off their axis?!!
    Whats more, if, IF the magnet thing worked (nice in theory) there is still no propulsion method! You would just have a spinning floating hub.

    Oh and the description is horrid as aforementioned.
    I do like futuristic concepts, but come on! this is in no way feasible today or ever in its current form. Back to the sketchpad I’m afraid.

  • Beautiful looking bike
    not sure that I want to sit on that saddle.
    I would have to see it working to believe it

  • monkeyfrog says:

    levitation and movement by magnetism? ok, could work if somewhere the powersupply is placed – but not in that small frame! ok, in future everything is a hundredth in space and another hundredth in strength, BUT … how to brake instantly?

  • Jos says:

    Well, let me say it’s terrible. Why?

    First semester mistakes:
    1. Contempting users anatomy
    2. No sketching ago (only computer trying)
    3. Terrible proportions

    Okay you can say it’s only a study… but also studies should be a bit innovative and not silly.

    And well glossy style, shame on you

  • Its amazed me. Curious to see it in working way…wasn’t you able to find video or it is just concept.

  • IAmThatStrange says:

    Um, I tried to picture a rider… hard. Handlebars are way below seat… Knees would bang against the arms as rider peddled. And with the seat that much higher than handlebars, looks like the rider would have to be a 10′ tall (Nav’i?) acrobat.
    I’d really like to see an animation of how it is supposed to work (with rider).

  • Zalgo says:

    Bicycle design should be left to those who have actually ridden one and have more than an elementary school understanding of physics

  • Tanguy says:

    will the rider’s mobile get in touch with any network, in the middle of such electromagnetic fields ? Not that it’s my main concern, but the rest, like the usual aspects of reality on earth are irrelevant anyway…. cute 😉

  • mif991 says:

    I agree with the critiques by most here. In the real world, the designers would be fired for wasting company’s time…unless of course you are freelancers…starving ones.

  • Alienzexist says:

    The wheel is held on by magnetism? I know magnets are trendy but come on. You might have well just said its held on by magic.

  • meinv says:

    Beautiful looking bike not sure that I want to sit on that saddle.
    I would have to see it working to believe it

  • Do editors of Yankodesign even review these designs before posting them? Yes most of the posts are eyecandy renderings but that’s pretty much all. Question to Yankodesign; Do you want to position yourself as the authority of hype?

    • mif991 says:

      I second your statement.

    • Yes, all designs are “reviewed” before becoming posts. Not all designs are let through because they are plausible. NO design is let through JUST because of its potential for “hype”. It is the intent of Yanko Design to stimulate designers, design, and those interested in design, not to promote eyecandy. But therin lies the dilemma, yes? There can be no relay of ideas to a broader audience than the designer if the designer does not make a design that isn’t comprehensible to more than just those who designed it. That also follows for people who want to access an audience larger than those who are in a position to produce their design or help them improve their design. More often than not, designers who successfully get published by design blogs are good at not only designing, but at hyping up their projects to the point where not only designers carry the message, but people who are more like spectators to this field. Yanko Design specializes in finding designs that are conceptual in nature, sometimes that means publishing designers whose designs are far beyond what’s possible in today’s world – but not beyond the imagination of these readers. This isn’t science fiction, it’s futurism.

      • Confucius says:

        I come here quite a bit. And in Chris’s defense, although this design is extremely far fetched (I have chewed it up in my previous comment), it deserves to be here, its provoking and reasonably well presented.
        Yanko have put it forward to US the audience to be the judges. If they censored and critiqued designs based on their personal opinions it wouldn’t be that interesting a site would it. Everyone likes a bit of drama, and something to have a go at too.

        Hopefully the designer can see the comments and learn from it, making them a better designer, better designers in this world is better for everybody. They wouldn’t have that knowledge if the design was kept under wraps and not portrayed in a forum such as this.

        • mif991 says:

          Point well taken Confucius and Chris. I do check in every morning to get inspired and to provide my comments before I get to work on my own designs, so on that respect good job Yanko. But some designs are not futuristic, they are way beyond unworkable ideas because they neglect basic laws of physics. But if designers want to subject themselves to negative criticism, then so be it….my teachers at Art Center used to do that on me…unmercifully…and I learned from it.

  • The Cycler says:

    Is ignoring the laws of physics the new mode? How the hell is the back wheel going to stay in one place, magnets/electricity is pure BS here.

  • kris says:

    sorry, but this is a design desaster

  • @Chris Burns

    Yes, stimulation for dialog in the design community is a good thing, but when something is rendered in a 3D application that challenges the laws of physics, forgive me, but all it comes across as is pampering the ego of the creator. What’s the use? When is this future coming? When humans will learn to levitate above ground, maybe…

    Don’t get me wrong, there are good concepts you guys post here, most of them are hype. I hope to see a day when YankoDesign has more stringent filtering of what has potential for discussion and what is pure hype/eye candy. Necessity is the mother of invention…

    best

  • love the design and concept, any videos to see it in action…anyone know of any youtube videos or other?

    • Bauski says:

      you don’t read the other comments?

      a) just a concept
      b) there can be no video of it working since it doesn’t work

  • Dr North says:

    Magnetism… Is there an inbuilt feature that will allow you to cycle past signposts, cars, Refuse skips without you sticking to them?

  • jason says:

    would be nice with a short str8 bar

  • Jake Swarm! says:

    So, I agree with pretty much every one of the comments. It would fall out of place, no actual drive train, lack of turning radius. It could possibly work as a track racer, but even then it would still have to deal with hard impacts. Also, the designers seemed to forget that because you hit a bump with the front first, the front is what needs more shock absorption. Even full suspension mountain bikes have more travel (the amount of distance the shock can move before bottoming out) in the front than in the back. I've seen way too many bikes made by designers who maybe ride a commuter and are trying to design a racer. It is disheartening as a cyclist to have people email me links like this with the subject "Holy (&@*!! This bike will change the way you ride!!!11!!ELEVEN!!" Ride bikes, then design them please, not the other way around.

  • Jake Swarm! says:

    So, I agree with pretty much every one of the comments. It would fall out of place, no actual drive train, lack of turning radius. It could possibly work as a track racer, but even then it would still have to deal with hard impacts. Also, the designers seemed to forget that because you hit a bump with the front first, the front is what needs more shock absorption. Even full suspension mountain bikes have more travel (the amount of distance the shock can move before bottoming out) in the front than in the back. I've seen way too many bikes made by designers who maybe ride a commuter and are trying to design a racer. It is disheartening as a cyclist to have people email me links like this with the subject “Holy (&@*!! This bike will change the way you ride!!!11!!ELEVEN!!” Ride bikes, then design them please, not the other way around.

  • gary says:

    one of the worst designs i've ever seen. please stop. this would never work, ESPECIALLY as a track racer, the pedals are 2 inches off the ground, you could only ride it in a straight line, if it were even rideable.

    a) not even worthy of being called a concept. concepts involve thought, and research, this has neither.
    b) it will never work, not even in theory.

    please stop doing stupid things.

  • gary says:

    one of the worst designs i've ever seen. please stop. this would never work, ESPECIALLY as a track racer, the pedals are 2 inches off the ground, you could only ride it in a straight line, if it were even rideable.

    a) not even worthy of being called a concept. concepts involve thought, and research, this has neither.
    b) it will never work, not even in theory.

    please stop doing stupid things.

  • Rob says:

    As a cyclist, this bike is not as far fetched as it may seem from an anatomical point of view. This bike would be fine for most road cycling where not much turning angle is needed, but would excel on the track, where the aerodynamic position would come into its own. The ground clearance would improve as the rider gained speed which i'm lead to believe raises the rear wheel. I too would really like to see this concept in a prototype stage.

    • Louiee says:

      i agree because when you think about it it could stay up by centre of gravity. Like with those little toys that balance on an edge or a surface because the centre of gravity keeps it up. And for it being a track bike, it would be perfect as the velodrome is curved and with the speed that track cyclists reach it would stay up.

  • Rob says:

    As a cyclist, this bike is not as far fetched as it may seem from an anatomical point of view. This bike would be fine for most road cycling where not much turning angle is needed, but would excel on the track, where the aerodynamic position would come into its own. The ground clearance would improve as the rider gained speed which i'm lead to believe raises the rear wheel. I too would really like to see this concept in a prototype stage.

    • Louiee says:

      i agree because when you think about it it could stay up by centre of gravity. Like with those little toys that balance on an edge or a surface because the centre of gravity keeps it up. And for it being a track bike, it would be perfect as the velodrome is curved and with the speed that track cyclists reach it would stay up.

  • HandlebarMoustache says:

    I agree that this is not a workable machine and never will be in its current concept. It needs to be remembered, never the less, that a huge proportion of our everyday things were also once a radical unworkable concept. 50 years ago, the PC was a wild-eyed idea, let alone things like an iPad etc. In the era of our cave dwelling ancestors, just about everything other than an open fire was an unimaginable idea.

    From ideas comes thinking, and from thinking comes realisation.

    I see this bicycle as an IDEA that could one day become reality.

  • HandlebarMoustache says:

    I agree that this is not a workable machine and never will be in its current concept. It needs to be remembered, never the less, that a huge proportion of our everyday things were also once a radical unworkable concept. 50 years ago, the PC was a wild-eyed idea, let alone things like an iPad etc. In the era of our cave dwelling ancestors, just about everything other than an open fire was an unimaginable idea.

    From ideas comes thinking, and from thinking comes realisation.

    I see this bicycle as an IDEA that could one day become reality.

  • Sarah says:

    It looks like something from a Dr. Seuss book. Granted, it's an interesting looking bike but overall, a functional fail

  • Sarah says:

    It looks like something from a Dr. Seuss book. Granted, it's an interesting looking bike but overall, a functional fail

  • Nick says:

    Would anyone here consider flying in a Wright Flyer? Chances are that your answer would be no since we have Concordes and Airbuses to rely on…. without ideas you have nothing and even designs that directly oppose the laws of physics have been tried before. At least this doesn't seem to rely upon a highly combustible substance as a source of energy for propulsion…

  • Nick says:

    Would anyone here consider flying in a Wright Flyer? Chances are that your answer would be no since we have Concordes and Airbuses to rely on…. without ideas you have nothing and even designs that directly oppose the laws of physics have been tried before. At least this doesn't seem to rely upon a highly combustible substance as a source of energy for propulsion…

  • gan says:

    yeah! Theoritically its a nice concept.it’s limited only to theory.So please i suggest to read more of physics.

  • gan says:

    yeah! Theoritically its a nice concept.it’s limited only to theory.So please i suggest to read more of physics.

  • DancingKim says:

    Greetings, i’m a professional dancer. i’d like to see to make a showreel regarding my promotions. I also desire to use some animation. Can someone suggest me a great animation studio, but definitely not very expensive? I’m here for 3 months for a tour.
    Love
    Kim.

  • DancingKim says:

    Greetings, i’m a professional dancer. i’d like to see to make a showreel regarding my promotions. I also desire to use some animation. Can someone suggest me a great animation studio, but definitely not very expensive? I’m here for 3 months for a tour.
    Love
    Kim.

  • sdfasd says:

    very nice cycle poka poka poka poka

  • mark milspaugh says:

    It doesn’t work… but not for the reasons you bikers who did stay awake in school think. The front wheel doesn’t work because magnets are heavy and the bike might lose friction here but gain much weight for a net loss in efficiency and gain in unsprung weight. Also, since the drive is pictured in the front, the inner and outer rim would be rotating at the same rate and there would be no induced field. The front wheel could not be gear-driven unless it was also hard suppported. It could be magnetically driven, like an induction motor with energy generated by the rider, but it would be less efficient than conventional. The rear doesn’t work because the repulsive magnetic field dissipates inversely at the square of distance. To generate an induced magnetic field with the spinning inner Aluminum rim, it would have to be maybe 1/4″ away from the probable Halbach array on the outer rim. Also, the closer the induced field is to the magnets, the greater the speed differential between magnet and induced field. As it is drawn, the magnets would not even know there was a field there. All other problems could be overcome. Good, creative thought by these designers will one day give the “real” bikers on here a job, even if it is just delivering them a pizza.

  • Vladimir says:

    One bike for oll ground? no need way, asfalt or special floor, magnific.

  • lala says:

    How can you sit on this flying bike and why you invent this and how is this safe for us and how do you land it safely and how is it going to fly safe for other people like what if we fall off the bike and why wont you just stick with bikes we have now and are you sick

  • lala says:

    How can you sit on this flying bike and why you invent this and how is this safe for us and how do you land it safely and how is it going to fly safe for other people like what if we fall off the bike and why wont you just stick with bikes we have now

  • lala says:

    How can you sit on this flying bike and why you invent this??

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