The Business Of Re-potting Plants

I’m not so updated with the green business, but I’m sure folks who have an active green thumb understand the nuances of “Re-potting a Plant” and the burden that comes with proper transfer of plants from one pot to the other. Re-flowerpot looks at doing away with the heartbreak of losing a sapling due to its incorrect transfer. The pot simply breaks-up into two parts, kinda like a mold for your soil and plant. Happy Re-potting to you!

Designer: Hyunjun Kim

re_flowerpot

Re-flowerpot by Hyunjun Kim

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37 Comments

  • Nomad Designer says:

    Has anyone, ever, encounter any issue to transplant flowers?

    Traditional flower pot have a generous draft angle that make the removal of the plant an easy operation : just turn it upside down.

    This is a solution to a problem that does not exist. Again.

    By the way, how do you fix your 2 parts together?

    • reality says:

      such a flawed design.

      1 it does not solve a problem.
      2 as the roots grow it will push it apart.

      sweating roots? who would want this over the existing design.

    • Astrid says:

      It looks you’ve never tried to replant plants with long roots going thru down hole.
      For me it’s very clever solution.

      Fix of 2 parties is very good visible on picture.

    • decaPODA says:

      to be very honest, i simply lauve the idea at the first glance and could see myself changing the flowers so often without worryin of killin the plants.
      good work Kim, though i/ people would have kloved the idea more had it been some ECO friendly material .. lol
      good work.

    • nonnegativetwat says:

      your a twat. enough said.

  • Marcel L. says:

    this thing will not be waterproof.

    • julia says:

      Marcel: all flowerpots are not supposed to be water proof, they are actually designed to drain water so the roots don’t rot…

      • Marcel L. says:

        but the clay made flowerpots kind of sweat out the water. i think there has to be more pressure to the two pieces or the water will just slip out too fast.

        and if the connection is too weak the roots will crack the pot apart.

        but great idea. with a few fixes i will work perfectly

        • julia says:

          I agree the connection needs to be redesigned and as I mentioned in my post below, the shape could now be more interesting…

  • julia says:

    now, about the design, having added this nice feature, why not to out and redesign the shape of the pot? you just eliminated the need for a daft angel, so why not make it more interesting? how about a ball shaped pot? or some vase like shape?

    • Jeff says:

      This is a good design; nothing needs to be changed. As far as I can tell, there’s a single draining hole in the smaller pot, and side drains on the larger ones.

      As for shaped pots, you would only be able to transplant from one shaped pot to another shaped pot. In which case this design feature is redundant.

  • mf says:

    would be useful for re-potting a cactus 😉

  • brack says:

    Think a little bigger in size.

    I can imagine this being used in the landscape industry to transfer trees from the nursery to the jobsite. It would make for easy exposure of the “root ball” before placing a tree in the ground. If it is strong enough the landscaper could take it back to the nursery for credit on their next purchase.

  • mimi says:

    Good idea!^^Fighting!

  • fuckinvision says:

    This problem exists. You who judge the negative idea, do not practice gardening.
    But there is a much more interesting and more functionality, which allows an easier opening of the vase and the same breathability of a crock pot.

  • Scilly Guy says:

    I want some, I always end up losing half my compost when I try and carefully tap out my plant.

  • pochly says:

    very very good

  • Margot says:

    I like this idea come re-potting time, but it seems like it would be a bit leaky to actually grow plants in….

  • Hey I am an Indian artist. Nice illustrations ,loved ur post

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  • Lisa K. says:

    Your flowerpot is a neat idea! You might try a tongue-and-groove design (grooves not extending all the way to the base of the pot) for attaching the two halves of the pot. This would still enable the halves to slide apart easily, but it would provide a more secure connection than the hooks.

  • Lisa K. says:

    Your flowerpot is a neat idea! You might try a tongue-and-groove design (grooves not extending all the way to the base of the pot) for attaching the two halves of the pot. This would still enable the halves to slide apart easily, but it would provide a more secure connection than the hooks.

  • Wombat says:

    Why? I read your post and I am still scratching my head.

    Invert pot, tap edge on hard surface and pot plant slides out.

    Place plant into larger pot, top up with potting mix, water and job done. Wash out old pot with disefectant and reuse pot.

    No need for two halves in any way shape or form.

    Now if you had made it out of one piece moulding of recycled newspaper, impregnated with a liquid fertilizer that you could just plant directly in the ground then you would be onto a winner. As you water your plants the pots break down into compost and help feed the plants not create more pollution by creating a less than usefull plastic prduct.

    As an Australian we tend to discard useless products very quickly. Might I suggest that we might not be the best place to launch your product.

  • Wombat says:

    Why? I read your post and I am still scratching my head.

    Invert pot, tap edge on hard surface and pot plant slides out.

    Place plant into larger pot, top up with potting mix, water and job done. Wash out old pot with disefectant and reuse pot.

    No need for two halves in any way shape or form.

    Now if you had made it out of one piece moulding of recycled newspaper, impregnated with a liquid fertilizer that you could just plant directly in the ground then you would be onto a winner. As you water your plants the pots break down into compost and help feed the plants not create more pollution by creating a less than usefull plastic prduct.

    As an Australian we tend to discard useless products very quickly. Might I suggest that we might not be the best place to launch your product.

  • Dave says:

    This is probably one of the cleverest solutions to a problem that doesn't exist I've seen in a while… if only it somehow improved on the millennia old model.

  • Dave says:

    This is probably one of the cleverest solutions to a problem that doesn't exist I've seen in a while… if only it somehow improved on the millennia old model.

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