Picture Perfect Shot

REC is a delightful camera that gives the subject an equal opportunity to view his pose as the camera clicks the picture. A rotating display at the back of the camera slides out to show what’s being captured in the frame. It may sound like a silly idea but I’ve had many good shots ruined because I trusted the photography skills of complete strangers. REC, you get my thumbs up!

Designer: Dongyeon Kim

18 Comments

  • James says:

    I had something very similar with my first digital camera about eight years ago. It had a pop up perspex view finder that you'd look through as it had no LCD display. The thing with that was that it wouldn't take exactly what you were looking at as the lens was beneath the view finder. Like I'd guess with this one, the lens won't compensate from being to the side of the view finder. So something that'd seem central to your eye will actually end up being to the left as there doesn't seem to be a way of checking it on a normal LCD display. It's a nice design but almost gone a bit backwards technology wise. I think I'd find this more frustrating to use if anything. Probably more of a camera for non-photographers, or women who like to keep a cute little camera in their bag for snapping them and their mates. Great for children though.

  • James says:

    I had something very similar with my first digital camera about eight years ago. It had a pop up perspex view finder that you'd look through as it had no LCD display. The thing with that was that it wouldn't take exactly what you were looking at as the lens was beneath the view finder. Like I'd guess with this one, the lens won't compensate from being to the side of the view finder. So something that'd seem central to your eye will actually end up being to the left as there doesn't seem to be a way of checking it on a normal LCD display. It's a nice design but almost gone a bit backwards technology wise. I think I'd find this more frustrating to use if anything. Probably more of a camera for non-photographers, or women who like to keep a cute little camera in their bag for snapping them and their mates. Great for children though.

  • Agreed, I'm not sure this is entirely useful. If the person being photographed wants to see what he/she looks like, they'll just look at the digital display on the back of the camera. The reverse display shown above isn't big enough to really get a good idea of how the picture looks, so the person being photographed will inevitably walk up to the camera to look, anyway. In which case, the reverse display is rendered unnecessary.

  • Agreed, I'm not sure this is entirely useful. If the person being photographed wants to see what he/she looks like, they'll just look at the digital display on the back of the camera. The reverse display shown above isn't big enough to really get a good idea of how the picture looks, so the person being photographed will inevitably walk up to the camera to look, anyway. In which case, the reverse display is rendered unnecessary.

  • Isaac says:

    I think that for regular users zooming in and out is pretty useful, because if not, they would have to walk to frame what they want. If they find zooming difficult they will just not use that feature. Tha side framing won’t be framing what the lens will capture, and there is no way that to compensate for that, because different distances between subject and camera cannot be calculated by the camera.

    Nice aesthetics, though, may be useful for fun and looks.

  • Askaaron says:

    It seems, to got it wrong – what pops it *is* the display. So you will see exactly, what the lens will record.

  • Askaaron says:

    It seems, to got it wrong – what pops it *is* the display. So you will see exactly, what the lens will record.

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    rebels aiming at forcing him to make decisions that he would normally never approve off.

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