Total Plug Safety

This Power Plug has been designed keeping child-safety in mind. It’s got a retractable blue cover that totally covers the metal pins and a button clasp that ensure no accidental pull-outs happen. When it comes to children, you really can’t predict how safe is safe…you can’t padlock everything and buffer every corner/edge. But small steps like a plug re-design or socket covers are mentally reassuring.

Designer: Luofang Jun

39 Comments

  • Alec006 says:

    good idea but you can’t use in a real situacion cos accord to electrical regulations the metal part it has to be without covering at all no plastic nothing in the whole world it’s the same rule.

  • Alec006 says:

    good idea but you can’t use in a real situacion cos accord to electrical regulations the metal part it has to be without covering at all no plastic nothing in the whole world it’s the same rule.

  • Arno Kling says:

    You said, this design would probably "be something for Europe".

    It's not. In Germany and most other countries our plugs are by initial design already more secure. This is, because a a cavity where the plug is inserted. There is no way you may touch the metal while plugging or unplugging
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schuko

  • Arno Kling says:

    You said, this design would probably “be something for Europe”.

    It's not. In Germany and most other countries our plugs are by initial design already more secure. This is, because a a cavity where the plug is inserted. There is no way you may touch the metal while plugging or unplugging
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schuko

  • whacko says:

    You have to have some serious wiring faults in you house in order to have an electrical charge jump from the outlet to the user when they unplug a device. In any case, if there is a spark when you unplug something it will ALWAYS go to the metal prong and would never jump to the user anyway. Modern plugs are designed to make it very difficult if not impossible to touch the metal prongs when plugging and unplugging devices, the only way you would ever get a shock from the metal prongs is if you intentionally tried to.

    This plug-cover idea is a complicated way to fix a problem that doesn't exist.

  • whacko says:

    You have to have some serious wiring faults in you house in order to have an electrical charge jump from the outlet to the user when they unplug a device. In any case, if there is a spark when you unplug something it will ALWAYS go to the metal prong and would never jump to the user anyway. Modern plugs are designed to make it very difficult if not impossible to touch the metal prongs when plugging and unplugging devices, the only way you would ever get a shock from the metal prongs is if you intentionally tried to.

    This plug-cover idea is a complicated way to fix a problem that doesn't exist.

  • You have to have some serious wiring faults in you house in order to have an electrical charge jump from the outlet to the user when they unplug a device. In any case, if there is a spark when you unplug something it will ALWAYS go to the metal prong and would never jump to the user anyway. Modern plugs are designed to make it very difficult if not impossible to touch the metal prongs when plugging and unplugging devices, the only way you would ever get a shock from the metal prongs is if you intentionally tried to.

  • You have to have some serious wiring faults in you house in order to have an electrical charge jump from the outlet to the user when they unplug a device. In any case, if there is a spark when you unplug something it will ALWAYS go to the metal prong and would never jump to the user anyway. Modern plugs are designed to make it very difficult if not impossible to touch the metal prongs when plugging and unplugging devices, the only way you would ever get a shock from the metal prongs is if you intentionally tried to.

  • Logan says:

    Also in many parts of the world, you can 'turn off' the plug to stop the flow of electricity instead of unplugging everything.

  • Logan says:

    Also in many parts of the world, you can 'turn off' the plug to stop the flow of electricity instead of unplugging everything.

  • anybody know Luofang Jun's contact info?

  • anybody know Luofang Jun's contact info?

  • Anthony says:

    All mains supply plugs destined for Australia (which shares the same plug type as China, but rotated 180 degrees) must now have an insulative cover down a fixed length of the active/live and neutral/return pins and the earth pin is longer ensuring that appliances with a ground are grounded first before being powered. All wall GPOs are switched at the GPO.

    I’d be concerned about this encouraging plugs to gradually slide out of worn sockets where they’re losing their grip. I’d also be curious about how long such a flexible cover would last and the increased cost of manufacture.

    Additionally, looking at the render, the inside of the sleeve could not retract such that the edge that meets the receptacle retracts beyond the solid base of the plug, meaning that the plug would not be stable in the socket and prone to rocking (especially given the parallel pin alignment of this type of plug).

    In defence of the design, however, I have a friend who frequently travels to and resides in Thailand and he’s frequently recounted stories of sparks always leaping out in particular buildings when he went to plug something in. Yes, this is due to poor wiring standards, but such things are often out of the control of the end consumer.

  • Anthony says:

    All mains supply plugs destined for Australia (which shares the same plug type as China, but rotated 180 degrees) must now have an insulative cover down a fixed length of the active/live and neutral/return pins and the earth pin is longer ensuring that appliances with a ground are grounded first before being powered. All wall GPOs are switched at the GPO.

    I’d be concerned about this encouraging plugs to gradually slide out of worn sockets where they’re losing their grip. I’d also be curious about how long such a flexible cover would last and the increased cost of manufacture.

    Additionally, looking at the render, the inside of the sleeve could not retract such that the edge that meets the receptacle retracts beyond the solid base of the plug, meaning that the plug would not be stable in the socket and prone to rocking (especially given the parallel pin alignment of this type of plug).

    In defence of the design, however, I have a friend who frequently travels to and resides in Thailand and he’s frequently recounted stories of sparks always leaping out in particular buildings when he went to plug something in. Yes, this is due to poor wiring standards, but such things are often out of the control of the end consumer.

  • This might make for a safer plug, but it doesn’t prevent children from sticking their fingers in the socket, which might be as common.

  • Bon je n’ai point terminé de lire par contre je passerai après

  • Encore un poste incontestablement intéressant

  • X says:

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