The Fad Of Molecular Cooking

Gourmet Guru Michelin star chef Juan Mari Arzak, thinks Molecular Cooking is the next step in gastronomical heaven. Presented here are three design concepts – Lunar Eclipse (bowl), Fama (long plate) and Bocado de Luz (serving plate), that take culinary expertise to celestial planes. Juan Mari & his daughter Elena Arzak feel that presentation skills not only entice the palate but also dynamically alter the sensory experience during a meal. “The simple act of placing food on the plates or pouring liquid into the bowl triggers sensory stimuli and causes them to react.”

Juan Mari Arzak says, “Molecular gastronomy has developed from a handful of exponents into a global phenomenon. It has led to the adaptation of scientific laboratory equipment and the invention of new kitchen technology, which makes it a small step to explore the presentation of dishes. The combination of our food creations on the multi-sensorial bone china concepts adds an extra dimension to the dining experience.”

Images Courtesy The Philips Design Food Probe Project.

Designers: Philips Design

Design Probe – Multi-sensorial Gastronomy by Philips Design

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12 Comments

  • this is so beautiful, in japan we put many importance on the way food looks, food design, very important for all food to portray a feeling, affects taste, there is japanese bento, like lunch box, very very pretty, always structured, this almost abstract bento

  • serkan taymur says:

    I am a student in ceramics in turkey such previously never seen the best designs I have seen one of them. was beyond excellent

    (Gourmet Guru Michelin star chef Juan Mari Arzak, thinks Molecular Cooking is the next step in gastronomical heaven. Presented here are three design concepts – Lunar Eclipse (bowl), Fama (long plate) and Bocado de Luz (serving plate), that take culinary expertise to celestial planes. Juan Mari & his daughter Elena Arzak feel that presentation skills not only entice the palate but also dynamically alter the sensory experience during a meal. “The simple act of placing food on the plates or pouring liquid into the bowl triggers sensory stimuli and causes them to react.”

    Juan Mari Arzak says, “Molecular gastronomy has developed from a handful of exponents into a global phenomenon. It has led to the adaptation of scientific laboratory equipment and the invention of new kitchen technology, which makes it a small step to explore the presentation of dishes. The combination of our food creations on the multi-sensorial bone china concepts adds an extra dimension to the dining experience.”

    Images Courtesy The Philips Design Food Probe Project.

    Designers: Philips Design

  • john q says:

    i’m confused what this is supposed to be….
    “The simple act of placing food on the plates or pouring liquid into the bowl triggers sensory stimuli and causes them to react” Causes what to react?

    • jk says:

      The lights in the plates react to the food. As is shown on the Philips Design Probes website.

  • mif991 says:

    But, does it (Molecular cooking) tastes good? and what is the spongy stuff in the first picture?

  • Ronco says:

    Presentation has everything to do when you’re cooking any specific dish. Examples include putting soup in an elaborate bowl that represents the restaurant you’re eating at or a serving dish to hold that 24 oz Porterhouse steak w/ a high-quality steak knife.

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