Camera for the Blind

Well that’s just silly! Why would a person who has no sight take a photograph that’s only able to be experienced by a person with full sight? Well that’s just it, isn’t it? Does the fact that the originator cannot experience the product they create make it incorrect for them to make it? Think about Van Gogh for instance – made art, around 2,000 pieces of it, but never became successful for it until after his death.

– should all of his artwork have gone into his grave with him?

The camera for the blind takes this a step further. Not only is this camera made for people who are blind to take photos, (that connect to sound clips recorded at the same time, very cool!), it’s also possible to link this to the vectorization and 3D printers of today and tomorrow and print the images back out so that the blind may “see.”

Imagine the possibilities!

Interviews and user-testing with prototypes was conducted at the Library for the Blind and Physically Handicapped in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Also I love how this camera looks, ironically. I hope it takes amazing photos because I’m really enjoying the exterior aesthetics.

Designer: Nadeem Haidary

Camera for the Blind by Nadeem Haidary

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20 Comments

  • 不明白 says:

    盲人要相机做什么?有些感官是可以用通感的方法来设计的,有些是很难的。故意用中文的。

  • 不明白 says:

    盲人要相机做什么?有些感官是可以用通感的方法来设计的,有些是很难的。故意用中文的。

  • Lamah says:

    Pretty difficult to capture 3D images with a base line as short as that. There’s a reason why there is a non-zero distance between our eyes.

  • Kurtis Gillette says:

    I think your comparison with the painter van Gogh is inaccurate. He could see what he painting.

  • Maddy says:

    This is no joke. My daughter was blinded by cancer at age 7, just when her friends were getting into having a camera. I bought her one and she enjoyed taking photos very much (pre-digital). She knew what she had taken and liked to have copies of her friends to show anyone who would look at them. She had a blind classmate who did the same. It was very important to these children, so why not adults, too?

  • Kurtis Gillette says:

    First of all I didn’t mean my comment as a joke. I wrote about the article not the subject.

    I am a fan of photography by visually impared artists, infact quite envious of their talent.

    A recent exhibition called ‘Sight Unseen’ in California, earlier this year is particularly impressive (check it out: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/8065984.stm).

    Going back to the article; I understand the comparison but a lot of artists are posthumously recognised.

  • Kurtis Gillette says:

    Please don’t include the right parenthasis in the URL.

    Regards

  • quantum says:

    How would it be able in 3D half the things peole take a picture of like a picture of a beach or lake? Infact how would it be able to print in 3D at all, it isn't a stereo camera and what happens to the back of what its printing, does it like only print half of the object?

    And how would the blind know what they are taking a picture of, imagine going to some place like Niagra Falls and then latter finding out you aimed too high and missed the falls.

  • quantum says:

    How would it be able in 3D half the things peole take a picture of like a picture of a beach or lake? Infact how would it be able to print in 3D at all, it isn't a stereo camera and what happens to the back of what its printing, does it like only print half of the object?

    And how would the blind know what they are taking a picture of, imagine going to some place like Niagra Falls and then latter finding out you aimed too high and missed the falls.

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