Blind And Deaf Communication

I really never gave it a thought before this, but how will a blind and a deaf person communicate with each other? One can’t hear the voices and the other can’t see the sign gestures! Both can’t learn each other’s special language; or can they? It may seem like a presumptuous situation, but something like the Sign Voice Language Translator (or SVLT) can offer a solution. The device acts like a translator, converting gestures in voice and voice into written text. I’d like to see a video of people testing this thing!

Designers: Han-na Lee & Sang Hyeon

Sign Voice Language Translator by Han-na Lee

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25 Comments

  • Johan says:

    Yes, this is a really nice concept. Closing the communication gap between to outliers.

  • Ram says:

    Kudos to Han-na Lee. It takes a special kind of person to invent something like this to help a vision impaired person communicate with some one who cannot hear anything

  • druweezy says:

    WOW WOW WOW!! IM INLOVE WITH IT, ITS SO 3DIMEMSIONAL, INCOPERATING BOTH PARTIES NOT JUST THE DISABLED… WOW WOW I LOVE THINKERS LIKE YOU

  • ncmacasl says:

    How exactly does this work? How does the deafperson see the text?? How does the device “read” signs??

  • ASLuser says:

    this device is simply impossible. if the designer of this device knew anything at all about American Sign Language they would know that there are two many parameters of sign that distinguish meaning for a device be able to succesfully detect and decifer “gestures”.
    did you know that a distinct part of what controls meaning in sign language actually happens on your face and not on your hands? how is your device going to interpret that?

  • random viewer says:

    this is a good idea although im not sure about the interpreting of sign language because there are far too many different types of sign lanuages (depending on which country you live in), but the language interpretar is a good idea for deaf people to have on their person (perhaps as a watch)

  • Noah says:

    This would also be great for trips to other countries! It’s a step towards the star trek translator-device.

  • Kinny Fear says:

    ASLuser
    THANK YOU.
    In addition, unless this device only translates manual versions of a spoken language, such as SEE, the “translation” would confuse the hearing recipient. Not only is the syntax of ASL different from that of English, but signs don’t necessarily have one single meaning encoded in them; ie, the spider is spinning a web. The parameters of the sign all depend on the size of the spider, its web, how fast it’s working and even whether the spider does a shoddy job.

    The people who think they can invent these things should maybe try doing some research before assuming they understand a different language.

  • Himanshu says:

    Hi.. i am deaf.. it is really concept.. How exactly does this work? How does the device “read” signs?

  • chua says:

    is this device out in the market? And did they mention any of it’s limitations?

  • guxiaoxing says:

    Yes, this is a really nice concept. Closing the communication gap between to outliers.Our life will become more friendly!

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  • Jam says:

    This a good concept, but I can’t say it hasn’t been thought of as an idea by many people. It’s just so ambitious. Would have helped if it was backed by a technology they plan to use.

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