Pack Only What You Need

Adventuring thrill seekers know the right equipment is key to a successful trip but making sure you have everything you need is a chore, especially if you’re one that likes to rock climb, base jump, snowboard, etc. The Modular Travel bag is a modular concept that snaps on only what you need. For example, you could have one module for rock climbing, one for base jumping, and one for snowboarding. You just snap on which ever module you need to the strap skeleton which comes with comfy padded shoulder straps and pockets for extra goodies.

Designer: Teo Song Wei

24 Comments

  • wei says:

    great design! where to buy it.

  • AG says:

    Uncomfortable suspension system, or lack there of one. No hipbelt to divert the weight to the iliac crest.

    Flat backpanel for the spine and shoulder strap positioning would likely cause serious medical damage.

    Current backpacking trend; Lightweight and Ultralight.
    This is neither, falling into the ultra heavy range.

    Additionally, this design is taken from one of the first commercial backpack designs ever made; the external frame backpack. You lash on what you need to the frame. Look up backpacks from the 1950s/60s/70s. This idea is the first idea to enter the sketchpad as a pack designer.

    A great example of student work, much room to build upon, and heading swiftly into the right direction.
    Nice rendering with quality surfacing. Which program was used here? Solidworks?

    Wei, this design is not commercial, you cannot purchase it.

  • thomas says:

    great idea

  • Darrone says:

    Is it that hard to take one bag off and put another on? Does this really require a modular system?

  • Mettleh3D says:

    nice idea. quiksilver = 2-3x premium markup.

  • teo song wei says:

    Thanks. It modeled in Rhino and rendered in Flamingo.

  • teo song wei says:

    Darrone: Yes i think it does, there is a market for customizeable product. The idea was initially catering for the adventure travel market in the future, where people will try all sorts of travel adventures to satisfy their adredaline needs.

    AG: Thanks for your valuable comments. yes I am a student and have much to improve on. Cheers!

    • AG says:

      teo song wei,

      You take my (sometimes harsh) critique extremely well. Cheers to you. Again, I realize much of the work on here is student blue-sky concepts. It is best to develop a thick skin now, rather than tear up in front of a CEO in the ‘real world’. It’s a very thin line to walk, since your design is a literal extension of your mind and yourself, yet, you need to step away from it to be torn apart, cost reduced, re-marketed, etc. When I was a student, I asked my peers to save their happy talk (“I like it”, “thats a cool idea”, “neat”) and criticize every detail of my design, then I would be able to take something from it, learn, and become a better designer.

      I do not intend to personally attack you or your designs, just offer valuable advice from a professional backpack designer.

      Though cost would be dramatic, you could think about doing another render using a composite material surface (kevlar, carbon, etc) to reduce the weight. Also, there could be two or four fixed mounting positions. This would save weight. The modular section would have the proper attachments, to attach onto these two or four points, rather than all being different.
      You could market this design as a specific niche product, for example; Alpine rescue teams, firefighters, NAVY Seals, MI6, etc. Within each sport there is a variety of different needs, so it could be a sport-specific backpack, with sport-specific modular accessories for the sport as well, etc.

      Also, the backpack housing that the modular options attach to could be hollow inside, and then open up for additional space. Maybe you could dry a shirt inside there. Or make it out of a honeycomb, so your back could breathe too.

      With the addition of a hipbelt and minor suspension system, this could be a step towards a realized concept. Do some research on what’s out there. Better yet, don’t do any research, you’re a student, use your imaginative creativity. Try to come up with an innovative solution to deliver the weight of the backpack to the hips of the (variously sized) users. This will make the pack much more comfortable over a long duration.

  • There would definitely be photographers interested in a modular gear system with solid, secure compartments that can easily be removed and reconfigured.

    Teo Song Wei-> If you’re interested in pursuing this avenue, check out the modular systems by Lowepro ( http://www.lowepro.com ) and Think Tank Photo ( http://www.thinktankphoto.com ) – they’re good, but not perfect.

    The currently existing modular camera systems are designed just to fit on waistbelts, which are very useful for shooting on the fly, but not so subtle or ideal for just walking around. Often I find myself wishing that I could reconfigure my gear while out in the field (when going home and switching bags is not an option)

    It would be great to have a modular skeleton kind of like this, where everything could be carried on the back for general hauling, and then individual lens pouches etc could be clicked down onto a waistbelt for the moments when a photographer will want to be rapidly switching them.

    I look forward to seeing what comes of these designs- and there’s definitely a market for modular carrying solutions in the photography world, so if you choose to explore that market and need someone to beta test things for you, I’d be happy to help 🙂

    take care,
    -jj

    • AG says:

      JJ,

      I designed this last year for a major photography case company. The belt is part of a larger backpack system, but the belt is removable. Then, you can wear the belt, and take off modular parts of the backpack, so you can quickly access and reconfigure these ‘pods’. Two of the photo pods are 100% waterproof as well. You can purchase additional pods for your needs. It is all adjustable and customizable on the fly. The idea was for adventure backpacker/photographers. This allows you to hike a mountain, set up basecamp, leave your backpack, take off the hipbelt, and attach your necessary photo equipment for day hikes to snap killer photos, rather than lug around your entire backpack full of hiking gear.

      No, by contract I’m not allowed to post any of the artwork before it is available to the consumer market.

      Look for it to hit the market this year.

      • Nice! Looking forward to seeing that, AG. If you’ve got a product announcement list when that comes out, put me on it ( jj at jjtiziou.net )

        Oh also on the modular thing – the folks at Tactical Tailor make some really nice gear, and their Malice clips make a pretty decent attachment system. Very sturdy, but a bit of a hastle to unclip. Of course, making an attachment system that is both very easily detached and yet impossible to *accidentally* detach is a decent design challenge… http://www.tacticaltailor.com

        -jj

  • Teo Song Wei says:

    Hi JJ,

    Thanks for the comments. Yes, i got the idea of a odular bag from photographer’s bag too. One of the objective in the project was to design something that Quiksilver can expand its product range from, and adventure photography was one of them

  • Gene says:

    Hey AG I like the way you think, who do you work for… i am currently looking for back pack designers to work with on a freelance basis, if you are interested please email me your work samples at: [email protected]

  • ayie says:

    good job..

  • mini says:

    I love it!

  • random viewer says:

    This could be a good design, but perhaps some sort of cover over all the modules could be created. This would mean less is seen from onlookers which adds to the security of the product (which is an essential for travellers) and if you have some sort of draw string system (would obviously need work on) to pull everything in tigher to the body it would mean the contents are closer to your body (which is better for the back) and it gives the bag a sleeker, less bulk look

    I do still think the module idea is a good design if made from light materials.
    An opportunity could be for backpackers/hikers so as to organise their packs

  • A hard suspension is just that…Hard! As a modular backpack company owner, the idea is right, but the concept is wrong! Wildland Firefighters as a whole have poor packs already. with this concept–soft and maleable is better–hard is, well–too rigid!
    A pack must transmit weight to the hips–just ask any wildland guy that tries to carry 35# on his shoulders. A pack must be able to go back and forth between shoulders and hips–as some like a lot of weight on their hips, some not!
    Good luck!

  • A hard suspension is just that…Hard! As a modular backpack company owner, the idea is right, but the concept is wrong! Wildland Firefighters as a whole have poor packs already. with this concept–soft and maleable is better–hard is, well–too rigid!
    A pack must transmit weight to the hips–just ask any wildland guy that tries to carry 35# on his shoulders. A pack must be able to go back and forth between shoulders and hips–as some like a lot of weight on their hips, some not!
    Good luck!

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