Help An Octopus Find His Legs

Here’s a great way to get kids involved with cleaning up the beach. This toy octopus is missing his 8 legs. You’re supposed to find plastic bottles and screw them on to become his legs. Once you get all 8, he’ll be buoyant enough to float.

Designer: Jaehyung Hong

43 Comments

  • jin woo han says:

    If I want to float that on the sea ,Should I have 8 empty bottles?
    However, that has 6 legs-hole .. where is 2 ? ^^

  • Ian says:

    What do you do with the cap you have to unscrew to screw it to that thing?

    Also 8 legs? why do I only see 6? hmm I may be crazy.

  • shane says:

    most bottles you find on the beach will be different sizes, shapes and often have different thread sizes which could be problematic

  • JeffU says:

    People:

    I think you’re missing the point [comments regarding number of legs, caps or bottle neck sizes].

    The idea is to encourage children to collect the bottles off the beach. Engaging them in a positive activity which helps the environment. If the bottle doesn’t fit, well at least they picked it up! If the bottle has a cap (and really who screws the cap back on an empty bottle only to toss it on a beach) they take the cap off…

    It’s a wonderful catalyst for teaching children ecological responsibility.

    • Matze says:

      “It’s a wonderful catalyst for teaching children ecological responsibility.”

      There is no way children will learn “ecological” responsibility with this “catalyst”. Children may collect bottles from the beach, but in the end not because of ecological reasons but because of “leg-finding” reasons. And that’s totaly not the same…

      A nice product though, this “sixtopus” :-)

  • Phrenic - Brazil says:

    If it’s a toy for kids, the kid won’t be happy unless the 6-legs octopus get 8 legs! What if the kid is in a clean beach? Maybe he would get bottles from the garbage. Or make his family drink 16 liters of soda, so he can get 8 bottles to use 6.

  • Greg Turner says:

    I love the idea. That someone would make a toy like this restores some of my faith in design. This about it: should it require the same bottle for each “leg,” the child could go find bottles and place the ones that don’t work in the recycling bins or in the trash (because recycling bins might be hard to come by on the beach). Two challenges solved: the problem-solving skills of the kid get developed AND more than six bottles are picked up off the beach. And for those who claim the kid might pull bottles out of the trash to complete the octopus? Please don’t have children. No one wants your little hellions running unsupervised out in the world.

  • Erin says:

    Love it. I’d buy one if I knew how to get it in the U.S.

  • Swinefactory says:

    SEXTOPUS!!!

  • Tully says:

    Idea: creative…. beyond that I think we’re kidding ourselves a bit here. Yes, it only has six holes for bottles (really glad right now that Jaehyung Hong isn’t designing airplanes), and yes the threading on bottles will be different. To think that kids will simply run to the recycling bin (easily located on the beach?!) when they find one that doesn’t fit is, well, stretching it to say the least. You and I both know that pretty soon (if they do indeed find this fun) they will stop seeing the bottles they know won’t fit, and will only be picking up the ones that do…

    I have to agree with Matze that children won’t learn about ecological responsibility through picking up trash AND PLAYING WITH IT…

    What’s that Timmy? You want to take your trash – I mean “toy” home? I really don’t want those dirty things in my new SUV so we better recycle them before we leave. Sorry, they don’t seem to have recycling bins here at the beach Timmy, so just throw them in the trash and we’ll recycle them next time….

    Six Legged Design Thingy: 1
    Environment: 0

  • illnoise says:

    This comment thread is everthing that’s great about the internet. Take a nice idea and rip it apart. And everyone’s right, it *is* a *nice* idea with good intentions, but it’s also totally unrealistic and impractical, and the fact that the happy promo pictures show the product with eight (sorry six) clean, uniform, label-less bottles undermines the whole point. I just keep thinking of more and more questions about its practicality, on top of the many listed already. Does it make sense to use more plastic to make the octopus? Is the octopus recycleable and/or made from recycled materials? Do we need more plastic? Is this really something a parent is going to want to drag to the beach along with 500 other toys, blankets, umbrellas, picnics, etc? Where do the caps go? Do cigarette butts, shards of glass, syringes, etc go into the bottles first? How long before kids fill the bottles with saltwater and turn it into a 3-lb ninja throwing star? What percentage of discarded bottles on the beach contain urine? do parents really want their kids playing with trash and dragging dirty, urine-filled bottles home? And I’m sorry, an octopus has eight legs, if they needed to make it with six, they shoulda called it an insect or a space station or Sealab or something.

  • Zach says:

    wow, this is incredible, a simple design that probably works. I just hope that once they’re done making the octopus they dont throw the bottles back on the beach

  • jinho says:

    I knew it I knew it would happen ! good .

  • Lipo Net says:

    This is a very cool idea. What a great way to keep a kid busy for a while.

  • gemma says:

    Does anyone know how to contact Jaehyung Hong as im doin a project on engaging kids with discarded material and it would help alot! Thanks

  • daniel says:

    it’s a great idea: encourages children to recycle/keeping the enviornment clean while also enjoying themselves. and BTW, cap sizes are always the same so that’s not a problem

  • Edgar says:

    Octopus have tentacles not legs haha Its a great concept. Congratulations!

  • Respetocles says:

    So it’s a sixtopus

  • F-you says:

    “Octopus have tentacles not legs haha Its a great concept. Congratulations!”

    Nope, Octopi have legs.

    Squid have got tentacles though.

  • Eponymous says:

    Don’t touch it, little boy! Can’t you see it only has six legs? It’s not an octopus! You are being deceived! If it’s lied about that, who knows what else it is plotting? Don’t help it’s evil plans come to fruition!

  • Maurice says:

    Hmmm. I don’t know whether this is engenius or ill-conceived. People have brought up great points on each side. I think if they’re the type of parents to buy this toy, the toy will get some use, because the kids will be used to playing with creative toys. If the parent really values recycling enough to consider this, they probably aren’t dragging a ton of commercial toys to the beach either. Also, the toy doesn’t need threads. It could just have clamps that lock onto any sized bottle cap. As an educational toy, it should be anatomically correct, at least to the extent of having the right number of limbs. 😉

    What does concern me is that I’ve never seen bottles at a beach. I live in northern California, and I guess all the beaches I’ve been to here are next to redwood forests as opposed to cities, so maybe I’m sampling the wrong beaches for this? But isn’t the beach in the hippy area going to be where the most ecologically minded parents live? Anyway, since I’ve never seen bottles just left on the beach, as another commenter mentioned, I’d be very concerned about the hygenics and safety of encouraging my kids to collect them. Same with any type of trash.

  • Maurice says:

    Hmmm. I don’t know whether this is engenius or ill-conceived. People have brought up great points on each side. I think if they’re the type of parents to buy this toy, the toy will get some use, because the kids will be used to playing with creative toys. If the parent really values recycling enough to consider this, they probably aren’t dragging a ton of commercial toys to the beach either. Also, the toy doesn’t need threads. It could just have clamps that lock onto any sized bottle cap. As an educational toy, it should be anatomically correct, at least to the extent of having the right number of limbs. 😉

    What does concern me is that I’ve never seen bottles at a beach. I live in northern California, and I guess all the beaches I’ve been to here are next to redwood forests as opposed to cities, so maybe I’m sampling the wrong beaches for this? But isn’t the beach in the hippy area going to be where the most ecologically minded parents live? Anyway, since I’ve never seen bottles just left on the beach, as another commenter mentioned, I’d be very concerned about the hygenics and safety of encouraging my kids to collect them. Same with any type of trash.

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