Backpack Creates Renewable Energy

Unlike my camping buddies who will poke fun at me for this, I will always bring along every electronic device that I can fit in my pack. Gotta have the phone, the camera, and I’ve even been known to sneak a laptop on occasion. Problem is, the batteries are dead within the day and I inevitably regret the extra weight. The Alppac is for anyone like me. It uses a suspended load mechanism to produce an electrical charge when the user is walking. Plug in your phone, iPad, or any other electronic device and get a renewable, clean charge between stops.

Designer: Joel Lim YM

30 Comments

  • Mike Barnard says:

    Prior art on the tech: http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2005/09/0

    The design is pretty otherwise, but pushes too much of the load too far back of the person's center of gravity. This would force the person to lean forward more than ergonomically desireable. For power generating effectiveness and comfort of the design, I believe that the waist belt would be required to be fastened as well, otherwise the pack would be shifting all over your back.

    The power generation technology apparently is a bit of a wash from an additional weight vs reduced stress, but the design features a lot of modern luggage features which add weight.

    Trim some of the fripperies, adjust the load to be closer to the body and oriented more up-and-down, ensure that the waist belt is fastened in the renderings, pay attention to the lightest weight materials and the design will be much improved.

    Cheers,
    Mike

    • Joel says:

      Hi Mike,
      Thank you for your constructive feedback, i really appreciate it. What i wanted to achieve for this project was to explore other forms of renewable energy. The design and mechanism does have alot of loopholes in terms of the weight and whether it would work in a real hiking scenario. Sadly, due to time constraint, i wasn't able to do more with this school project.

      Cheers,
      Joel Lim YM

  • I like the idea of harnessing energy from a…. harness, but the pack needs to be designed in consultancy with someone who has spent a lot of time on the hill. I wouldn't take it out as it it designed now – too complicated & impractical for daily use.
    I think with some work this concept could be brought to market though.

    Nice idea.

    • Joel says:

      Hi, thanks for your feedback. I understand where you are coming from, this was a school project and much more can be done to improve the practicality of the design. I did consult a professional hiker and mountaineer for this project and interpreted the information the best i can.

      Cheers,
      Joel Lim YM

  • Joel says:

    Hi, thanks for your feedback. I understand where you are coming from, this was a school project and much more can be done to improve the practicality of the design. I did consult a professional hiker and mountaineer for this project and interpreted the information the best i can.

    Cheers,
    Joel Lim YM

  • Joel says:

    Hi Mike,
    Thank you for your constructive feedback, i really appreciate it. What i wanted to achieve for this project was to explore other forms of renewable energy. The design and mechanism does have alot of loopholes in terms of the weight and whether it would work in a real hiking scenario. Sadly, due to time constraint, i wasn't able to do more with this school project.

    Cheers,
    Joel Lim YM

    • Jimmy C says:

      Who cares? It's a concept, he'll put his own flag on it when he gets it patented.

  • Ray says:

    While I do like the idea, I think there are a few problems. Firstly, I wonder about the size and weight of the energy capture mechanism. My opinion is that people are inherently lazy and if the bag is noticeably heavier they would be less inclined to purchase the product. The second issue is the kind of battery storage is being used. Backpacks go through a great deal of wear and tear and may not be suitable for holding of batteries. A first aid compartment is really just a nice name for an extra pouch and the ease of opening will likely be more of a hassle than a boon (things will likely fall out, especially as the bag ages).

  • Ray says:

    While I do like the idea, I think there are a few problems. Firstly, I wonder about the size and weight of the energy capture mechanism. My opinion is that people are inherently lazy and if the bag is noticeably heavier they would be less inclined to purchase the product. The second issue is the kind of battery storage is being used. Backpacks go through a great deal of wear and tear and may not be suitable for holding of batteries. A first aid compartment is really just a nice name for an extra pouch and the ease of opening will likely be more of a hassle than a boon (things will likely fall out, especially as the bag ages).

    • Joel says:

      Hi Ryan,
      you do have a point about the first aid compartment. Thanks for pointing that out.

      Cheers,
      Joel Lim YM

  • jaxa says:

    I love this, and all ideas that harness the energy in things that are going on around us all the time every day. Thank you to the designer for thinking about ways to make products we all need in ways that help meet our energy needs. Please keep doing it.

  • jaxa says:

    I love this, and all ideas that harness the energy in things that are going on around us all the time every day. Thank you to the designer for thinking about ways to make products we all need in ways that help meet our energy needs. Please keep doing it.

  • Yehoshua says:

    I have to say, it is an amazing concept, but I will have to agree with the others, it is unconfortable and would probably lead to back pain, if the day pack had more space for me to fit in a laptop, some notebooks and a charger, than I would get it for every day use because I love the minimal design it has.

  • milK says:

    Well, it’s a valid point to bring up. I’ve seen it happen quite a lot as well that people mistake the Red Cross flag with the Swiss one. Not a mayor issue but still a small error easily solved and better to know it now than after production (and yes, I know it’s only a student assignment but especialy as a designer you’re supposed to look at the details.)

  • Farlion says:

    True story. Where am I from? First Aidtzerland?!

  • Read this says:

    There are way too many autospun articles packed with spam on the net.

    Just how do I know, simply because I had to spend 20 mins to
    actually locate this blog… it had been the only one which had genuinely
    relevant info. I can’t believe what is happening to google.

  • kable says:

    When I initially commented I clicked the “Notify me when new comments are added” checkbox and
    now each time a comment is added I get three emails with the same
    comment. Is there any way you can remove me from that service?
    Thanks a lot!

  • Homepage says:

    It was interesting. You appear pretty skilled in their field.

  • Spot on with this write-up, I absolutely believe that this site needs mucdh more attention. I’ll probably be back again to read through more, thanks for the information!

  • health cover says:

    At this moment I am going to do my breakfast, when having my breakfast coming yet again to read further news.

Comments are closed.