Power Line-up

Spike-busters and power strips usually sport their set number of sockets regardless the shape of the plugs to be used. Unless you go in for the expensive Belkin ones, “extension cords” here in India are standard and sport limited sockets. Something like the Slot-Type Power Outlet will be handy for us and the world over. The idea is not to have “holes” or set number of “sockets”, but just a swipe-in slot to hook up the plugs. This ways different shaped plugs reside comfortably next to each other plus accommodate more than the regular strips.

Slots for 3-pin and 2-pin plugs are different though, but easy to manage.

Designer: Chen Yinfeng

47 Comments

  • dashirui says:

    A solution for the crowded world

  • dashirui says:

    A solution for the crowded world

  • wei says:

    nice but hard to realized due to technical/safety difficulty.

  • wei says:

    nice but hard to realized due to technical/safety difficulty.

  • I see sparks when I remove the plug without switching off, in the regular spike busters. How safe is it from that? This would be more of a safety hazard unless someone figures a way around it.

  • I see sparks when I remove the plug without switching off, in the regular spike busters. How safe is it from that? This would be more of a safety hazard unless someone figures a way around it.

  • guitarguru102 says:

    Cool concept. This would be difficult to implement because each plug would not be gripped individually. Thus, any that are slightly thinner would slip out (and the force to hold all plugs would be reduced, the more you plug in). And yes, the safety of sticking, say, a knife in the slot, ha. Also, the typical "wall-wart" adaptors take up much more space mounted in a line like this than they do in a typical power strip configuration (side-by-side).

  • guitarguru102 says:

    Cool concept. This would be difficult to implement because each plug would not be gripped individually. Thus, any that are slightly thinner would slip out (and the force to hold all plugs would be reduced, the more you plug in). And yes, the safety of sticking, say, a knife in the slot, ha. Also, the typical “wall-wart” adaptors take up much more space mounted in a line like this than they do in a typical power strip configuration (side-by-side).

  • potter says:

    I have recently been involved in a project redesigning a powerboard and although I like the concept of this presentation I can absolutely guarantee you this would not pass the Australian Standards electrical tests. However I don’t wish to sound too critical because we must remember the exploration of an impractical concept might eventually lead to a practical but unconventional solution. Nice work Chen.

  • potter says:

    I have recently been involved in a project redesigning a powerboard and although I like the concept of this presentation I can absolutely guarantee you this would not pass the Australian Standards electrical tests. However I don’t wish to sound too critical because we must remember the exploration of an impractical concept might eventually lead to a practical but unconventional solution. Nice work Chen.

  • calvin says:

    I remember that I have seen this kind of work which designed by a Japanese designer(nendo, maybe) before, I have to say this is a nice work, but I doubt it's a original design or not.

    • Yes, I had one of these when I was a kid, 20 years ago. They don’t work very well because the plugs fall out too easy and it’s too easy to overload by plugging too much stuff in.

  • calvin says:

    I remember that I have seen this kind of work which designed by a Japanese designer(nendo, maybe) before, I have to say this is a nice work, but I doubt it's a original design or not.

  • boxedfish says:

    hasn't this been done and sold and patented? what if some little toddler shove a fre coins into the slots and get fried?

  • boxedfish says:

    hasn't this been done and sold and patented? what if some little toddler shove a fre coins into the slots and get fried?

  • I think the idea is very good and very useful.
    Only thing…specs need to be cleared about what is the maximum charge we can put on as i guess some people will fill the power line-up with as many plugs as possible..

    Can we buy it now ? on internet ?

  • I think the idea is very good and very useful.
    Only thing…specs need to be cleared about what is the maximum charge we can put on as i guess some people will fill the power line-up with as many plugs as possible..

    Can we buy it now ? on internet ?

  • Looks great for power chords with skinny plugs like most of those shown. Unfortunately, most of my devices have been designed so the AC downconverter box is right at the end of the chord and is super bulky like the one shown on the right-hand side of the demonstration photo there. When the device plugs themselves are bulky, being able to slide them closer together becomes much less of a concern.

  • Andrew says:

    Also, how do you make sure the plugs are inserted the correct way around? not sure if phase & neutral are interchangeable?

  • Andrew says:

    Also, how do you make sure the plugs are inserted the correct way around? not sure if phase & neutral are interchangeable?

  • simon says:

    it's so dangerous !

    I can't see any design for safety

  • simon says:

    it's so dangerous !

    I can't see any design for safety

  • Yes, I had one of these when I was a kid, 20 years ago. They don’t work very well because the plugs fall out too easy and it’s too easy to overload by plugging too much stuff in.

  • sean says:

    We had one of these in our kitchen throughout my entire childhood (1970s), so I'd hardly call it a new design.
    I am grateful our house didn't burn down!

  • sean says:

    We had one of these in our kitchen throughout my entire childhood (1970s), so I'd hardly call it a new design.
    I am grateful our house didn't burn down!

  • SchizoDuckie says:

    Nice idea from a design perspective, but what happens when 2 poles from 2 different devices connect because one of them or both of them are inserted under an angle?

  • SchizoDuckie says:

    Nice idea from a design perspective, but what happens when 2 poles from 2 different devices connect because one of them or both of them are inserted under an angle?

  • erik says:

    Ergonomicly great, but the safety sucks. What if a kid sticks something in the phase slot?

  • erik says:

    Ergonomicly great, but the safety sucks. What if a kid sticks something in the phase slot?

  • sarreq says:

    I actually had something similar when I was a kid, it wasn't as nice looking, or as large. they're only good for lamps. I'm not sure if this only applies to US plugs, but, if you plug anything polarized in, you run the risk of destroying that piece of equipment.
    and erik is right, the safety is abysmal.

  • …if you have some idiot kid, don't buy it.

  • …if you have some idiot kid, don't buy it.

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  • David Yiu says:

    Where I can buy this good design electrical
    appliance ? Thank you.

  • David Yiu says:

    Where I can buy this good design electrical
    appliance ? Thank you.

  • eyeooo says:

    这个设计,看似是中国标准,但是他不符合“标准呢”即使生产了也无法通过认证,可惜了。

Comments are closed.