Signs on a Tree

Imagine using a flexible LED solar panel as traffic signal! The idea is awesome. It can be installed on any existing circular base like a tree or a utility pole. So there you have a tree that’s a prime spot for a pedestrian signal, and here is this flexi strip waiting to be coiled around the tree! Easy urban and rural installation.

Designers: Gisung Han, Hwanju Jeon & Jaemin Lee

67 Comments

  • David says:

    How do you communicate with the central system?
    And I think it is not stable on trees, compares to metal poles.

  • David says:

    How do you communicate with the central system?
    And I think it is not stable on trees, compares to metal poles.

  • Domas says:

    Trees do grow. Wearable signal needs to accommodate it. And tree will stop sunlight from reaching solar panel.

    @David: I think it will communicate using wireless network. (Signal Cover?)

  • Domas says:

    Trees do grow. Wearable signal needs to accommodate it. And tree will stop sunlight from reaching solar panel.

    @David: I think it will communicate using wireless network. (Signal Cover?)

  • mf1 says:

    Traffic signals need to be reliable. This concept isn't.

  • mf1 says:

    Traffic signals need to be reliable. This concept isn't.

  • Truthiness says:

    Why are so many people trying to redesign traffic signals? Find something that has real flaws and actually do some good.

  • Truthiness says:

    Why are so many people trying to redesign traffic signals? Find something that has real flaws and actually do some good.

  • 簡于超 says:

    i think the biggest problem of this concept is that, the green & red light can been see by everyone from any direction, so when you put 4(or even more) of this traffic light on the crossroads, will easily cause confusion.

  • 簡于超 says:

    i think the biggest problem of this concept is that, the green & red light can been see by everyone from any direction, so when you put 4(or even more) of this traffic light on the crossroads, will easily cause confusion.

  • 簡于超 says:

    i think the biggest problem of this concept is that, the green & red light can been see by everyone from any direction, so when you put 4(or even more) of this traffic light on the crossroads, will easily cause confusion.

  • Guest says:

    Bla bla bla … You don´t have to be envious.
    It´s a very good idea!

    • Ashley says:

      Really, are you serious? No one here is *envious*.
      They have legitimate concerns about a design that probably wouldn't work in the real world.

      • Otto Yamamoto says:

        I disagree. The idea can use some refinement-namely specific directional targeting and working out a pedestrian actuation system, but it's a good concept. This sort of setup would cost a fraction of what a standard pedestrian light setup would cost, and would be ideal for adding pedestrian signals to existing signal installations. It could also be an ideal setup for temporary signals.

        • Ashley says:

          Your fixes would definitely make it more viable, but my real point was that the people mentioning flaws actually have legitimate claims. If they didn't, then you wouldn't have been able to make such good suggestions.

          However, I was also noting how "Guest" automatically just dismissed their claims as "envy", which is absolutely ridiculous.

  • Guest says:

    Bla bla bla … You dont have to be envious.
    Its a very good idea!

    • Ashley says:

      Really, are you serious? No one here is *envious*.
      They have legitimate concerns about a design that probably wouldn't work in the real world.

      • Otto Yamamoto says:

        I disagree. The idea can use some refinement-namely specific directional targeting and working out a pedestrian actuation system, but it's a good concept. This sort of setup would cost a fraction of what a standard pedestrian light setup would cost, and would be ideal for adding pedestrian signals to existing signal installations. It could also be an ideal setup for temporary signals.

        • Ashley says:

          Your fixes would definitely make it more viable, but my real point was that the people mentioning flaws actually have legitimate claims. If they didn't, then you wouldn't have been able to make such good suggestions.

          However, I was also noting how “Guest” automatically just dismissed their claims as “envy”, which is absolutely ridiculous.

  • Ashley says:

    Really, are you serious? No one here is *envious*.
    They have legitimate concerns about a design that probably wouldn't work in the real world.

  • Mack says:

    When I first saw this, I thought it was really cool. But after looking at it for a while, I realized that, besides it looking nicer on a tree instead of a pole, it is completely useless. This offers no communication from the grid. Wireless signals would not be reliable, nor would a solar power cell, as these things wouldn't work at night!!!
    All other concerns are nothing in comparison to those two oversights, but still valid; like the directionality of the display, trees growing etc etc..
    Also, it claims to be efficient because it does not need a metal pole to hold it, however, the metal poles that hold these things, are most often the same pole that suspends the traffic lights, and street lights above the intersection, which are necessary anyway…so might as well use those….
    …and who's to say that there would be a tree at all four corners of every intersection? And if not, should we be planting trees, and waiting 15 years for them to grow before finishing the intersection?
    A cool looking design, but completely useless in almost every way.
    A design like this could only be useful if they were simply, sidewalk lights/street lamps outside of stores etc…that way they could charge during the day, and be on during the night…. but some work would have to be put into the solar technology, as anyone with solar garden lights know, they fade quickly, especially after a cloudy day.

    • Francisco says:

      A technology like this is one of those that requiere some changes in the way people live and set up their environment. If this requires a change such as having more vegetation in a city, is that not something good? anyways, these new designs are made to change, to simplify or enhace our way of life, not to be able to fit in the current sucky set up of cities. What I say is that, almost everything you said is made a critic just because it signifies a change in your way of life or the way you conceive a city. But it is exactly that change that is necesary, and this product could very well help doing that.

  • Mack says:

    When I first saw this, I thought it was really cool. But after looking at it for a while, I realized that, besides it looking nicer on a tree instead of a pole, it is completely useless. This offers no communication from the grid. Wireless signals would not be reliable, nor would a solar power cell, as these things wouldn't work at night!!!
    All other concerns are nothing in comparison to those two oversights, but still valid; like the directionality of the display, trees growing etc etc..
    Also, it claims to be efficient because it does not need a metal pole to hold it, however, the metal poles that hold these things, are most often the same pole that suspends the traffic lights, and street lights above the intersection, which are necessary anyway…so might as well use those….
    …and who's to say that there would be a tree at all four corners of every intersection? And if not, should we be planting trees, and waiting 15 years for them to grow before finishing the intersection?
    A cool looking design, but completely useless in almost every way.
    A design like this could only be useful if they were simply, sidewalk lights/street lamps outside of stores etc…that way they could charge during the day, and be on during the night…. but some work would have to be put into the solar technology, as anyone with solar garden lights know, they fade quickly, especially after a cloudy day.

    • Francisco says:

      A technology like this is one of those that requiere some changes in the way people live and set up their environment. If this requires a change such as having more vegetation in a city, is that not something good? anyways, these new designs are made to change, to simplify or enhace our way of life, not to be able to fit in the current sucky set up of cities. What I say is that, almost everything you said is made a critic just because it signifies a change in your way of life or the way you conceive a city. But it is exactly that change that is necesary, and this product could very well help doing that.

  • @uopjo6 says:

    Good idea to create a traffic jam

  • Santiago Cantera says:

    excelent!

  • Monterey Jack says:

    Trees do grow, but they’re regularly pruned in cities. I imagine they’d do the same for any tree that this light’s attached to, but that’s still quite a bit less maintenance than a big steel signal pole would require.

  • very cool idea i like it… looks clean and it seems more visible then what is used today.

  • Icarin says:

    I agree that we need change in our cities, but this approach is not practical. Yes, it is less costly to implement these (in theory, wait until the patent lawsuits come) but the change you are commenting has a high cost overall so I really doubt any city would like to change its entire structure just to have these traffic lights working efficiently.

    What would be better is just to have the regular traffic lights with some solar panels on them (I’ve seen more efficient models every year) so it cost less for the city to provide energy to them.

  • Icarin says:

    Weird. My last comment was intended for Francisco’s comment as a reply but appeared here instead.

  • This is really cool, I wouldn’t even mind having one of these in my office or at home…

  • Jerrica says:

    How would you know which side of the street it was for if it goes all the way around the pole? Not practical or more easily communicated.

  • chris says:

    This product does not offer any important benefit over existing traffic signals. Placement of signals is not a significant issue at most traffic intersections, nor is providing power to them. In addition, there is no mention of how these lights can be linked with a traffic management network, or how they could receive back-up power which is a requirement by law in many countries. I would also question the designers understanding of basic electronics – does the solar panel produce enough power at night / in poor lighting to produce the lights needed? Shouldn’t there be a way to store excess energy for as backup for such situations?

  • Love the idea! Love the ease of use! Thanks for sharing!

Comments are closed.