One Component Wind Power

How would you like your very own take-it-home apply-it-yourself wind power generator? How about a whole array of them? This is a design that’s just that, take it home, unpack it, screw it into the wall, connect it to whatever battery you’ve got that can hold generated power, and let it rip! This design is made up of blades, the generator, a telescopic shaft (so that the fan can be extended or “away”, electric power plug, and switch. With an array of 15 of these fans, you can power a household of four people for a month.

Oh my goodness! One of these fans, called “Wind Cubes”, could potentially generate 21.6 kilowatt-hours per month. Times that by fifteen, and you’ve got 324 kw, the same amount the designers of this project note is the amount a family of four uses per month. Seems too perfect!

The way these “cubes” work is to be attached to a wall (outside) with three screws, click the switch to activate, and sit back to enjoy the power your mother earth is providing. Multiple cubes can be connected to not only generate more power, but strengthen their collective structure, and the fans can be pulled out or pushed back and away depending on the weather.

DO WANT, VERY VERY MUCH. Can you imagine it? Free electricity! No wonder this is a Liteon Award winning design this year! Hooray!

Designers: Liao-Hsun Chen and Wen-Chih Chang

68 Comments

  • Eivind says:

    Here's a clue:

    Windturbines work by letting the wind blow -trough- them, turning a turbine.

    Wind does not to a significant degree blow -trough- brick-walls.

    That is, trying to generate electricity from wind going directly towards (or away from) a wall, a few inches from the wall, is just about the most stupid placement possible. Some wind will go -along- the wall, so if these where positioned to take advantage of that, they'd be slightly less stupid, but offcourse, then the design wouldn't work.

    These could perhaps work, if they where stable enough to not require the backing of a wall, they could become a wind-gathering-fence, in effect.

    • lsg404 says:

      Have you ever put a toy propeller amongs the flowes in your window, you ignorant hater? Ever noticed how diligently it runs with winds not even detectable for you? The key is efficiency! Yeah, turbines are built on huge poles, to get the maximum effect, but what if a small, light device like this helps your budget a little? So chew on your "clue" a bit more, until there is actually data available.

    • Kenji says:

      I qouldn't use what you said, but you are right. These will, in fact, be worthless as-is. They need to be made into a fence-like design. Surround your house with them, and gather enough for your neighbors as well.

  • Eivind says:

    Here's a clue:

    Windturbines work by letting the wind blow -trough- them, turning a turbine.

    Wind does not to a significant degree blow -trough- brick-walls.

    That is, trying to generate electricity from wind going directly towards (or away from) a wall, a few inches from the wall, is just about the most stupid placement possible. Some wind will go -along- the wall, so if these where positioned to take advantage of that, they'd be slightly less stupid, but offcourse, then the design wouldn't work.

    These could perhaps work, if they where stable enough to not require the backing of a wall, they could become a wind-gathering-fence, in effect.

    • lsg404 says:

      Have you ever put a toy propeller amongs the flowes in your window, you ignorant hater? Ever noticed how diligently it runs with winds not even detectable for you? The key is efficiency! Yeah, turbines are built on huge poles, to get the maximum effect, but what if a small, light device like this helps your budget a little? So chew on your “clue” a bit more, until there is actually data available.

    • Kenji says:

      I qouldn't use what you said, but you are right. These will, in fact, be worthless as-is. They need to be made into a fence-like design. Surround your house with them, and gather enough for your neighbors as well.

  • edd says:

    I completely agree with the above statement.

    But I do like the fact how they created a honeycomb structure with pop up fans.
    If you take a way the solid wall and use it as a chicken wire mesh between two skyscrapers it might have a future.

  • edd says:

    I completely agree with the above statement.

    But I do like the fact how they created a honeycomb structure with pop up fans.
    If you take a way the solid wall and use it as a chicken wire mesh between two skyscrapers it might have a future.

  • Janniel says:

    No engineer here and not really mechanically savvy or anything. But it looks to me like the blades are designed to catch the wind from the side rather than from the front. Yes? No?.

  • Janniel says:

    No engineer here and not really mechanically savvy or anything. But it looks to me like the blades are designed to catch the wind from the side rather than from the front. Yes? No?.

  • Janniel says:

    Or, maybe it is both from the side and the back. Perhaps the blades are propelled by the back-draft from the wind hitting the solid surface. I totally hope these are affordable. I live by Lake Michigan, and we get lots of wind,

  • Janniel says:

    Or, maybe it is both from the side and the back. Perhaps the blades are propelled by the back-draft from the wind hitting the solid surface. I totally hope these are affordable. I live by Lake Michigan, and we get lots of wind,

  • FELIPE BOTTREL says:

    Well, I guess it´s just a matter of twisting the blades so it would catch the parallel wind. Simple as that.

  • FELIPE BOTTREL says:

    Well, I guess it´s just a matter of twisting the blades so it would catch the parallel wind. Simple as that.

  • Guest says:

    Cool concept, but I can assure you that it is not this simple to harness the power of wind. The company I work is currently developing a wind turbine. In it's current state of design it is fairly pricey and does not generate all that much power. Certianly not enough to power a household or four. Well, maybe if they only have a few lights turned on and no appliances.

    • Kenji says:

      Having an array of them can indeed power a household of four. If these worked like they are designed up above, I could put them on all sides of my house to power my entire neighborhood. Those whale-sized turbines have MUCH, MUCH more friction because of their size, but having smaller, lighter ones like these are way more efficient.

      Follow what lsg404 says. A pinwheel will move with even the slightest breeze. These, being made of plastic (the lightweight stuff that is used in toys) could move, no problem. I can go to my local electronics store to buy DC generators and power my pc with the aid of cardboard. Of course, you still need wind to pass through, so that is the determining factor.

      Keep in mind, guy with apparently worthless piece of paper, that in engineering, even the most slightest of details can change everything. If you ACTUALLY knew what you were talking about, you'd give us a name.

  • Guest says:

    Cool concept, but I can assure you that it is not this simple to harness the power of wind. The company I work is currently developing a wind turbine. In it's current state of design it is fairly pricey and does not generate all that much power. Certianly not enough to power a household or four. Well, maybe if they only have a few lights turned on and no appliances.

    • Kenji says:

      Having an array of them can indeed power a household of four. If these worked like they are designed up above, I could put them on all sides of my house to power my entire neighborhood. Those whale-sized turbines have MUCH, MUCH more friction because of their size, but having smaller, lighter ones like these are way more efficient.

      Follow what lsg404 says. A pinwheel will move with even the slightest breeze. These, being made of plastic (the lightweight stuff that is used in toys) could move, no problem. I can go to my local electronics store to buy DC generators and power my pc with the aid of cardboard. Of course, you still need wind to pass through, so that is the determining factor.

      Keep in mind, guy with apparently worthless piece of paper, that in engineering, even the most slightest of details can change everything. If you ACTUALLY knew what you were talking about, you'd give us a name.

  • Graham says:

    The invisibility of all those spinning blades would be a great to remove unwanted limbs!
    Ah CAD eh… Photorealism versus realism… Seems lots of design competition judges live in second life too.

  • Graham says:

    The invisibility of all those spinning blades would be a great to remove unwanted limbs!
    Ah CAD eh… Photorealism versus realism… Seems lots of design competition judges live in second life too.

  • Joe says:

    I was just about to post the same thing that is said in the first comment, this doesn't seem so smart.

  • Joe says:

    I was just about to post the same thing that is said in the first comment, this doesn't seem so smart.

  • ilker says:

    The hexagon idea is great. As everyone says the blades are not quite right but one designer (or two) does not have to think everything. But I believe it can be fixed somehow. Nonetheless it inspires me and it is a right step

  • ilker says:

    The hexagon idea is great. As everyone says the blades are not quite right but one designer (or two) does not have to think everything. But I believe it can be fixed somehow. Nonetheless it inspires me and it is a right step

  • Eduardo says:

    The idea is great, I really love the honeycomb-structure, but I also have some doubts about the execution. A wind generator should be placed out in the open air, not right next to a wall. And I fail to think how it could catch wind blowing parallel to the wall – there's no way you can spin a fan that way, unless you blow wind just in the upper or lower part of the blades.

    Of course I haven't seen these things actually working, so I might be wrong too. Still, I believe they'd be better placed on roofs instead.

  • Eduardo says:

    The idea is great, I really love the honeycomb-structure, but I also have some doubts about the execution. A wind generator should be placed out in the open air, not right next to a wall. And I fail to think how it could catch wind blowing parallel to the wall – there's no way you can spin a fan that way, unless you blow wind just in the upper or lower part of the blades.

    Of course I haven't seen these things actually working, so I might be wrong too. Still, I believe they'd be better placed on roofs instead.

  • Mount this near a medium to heavy wind area for Max use.
    & make blades Visible for PM eve windstorms or CA Santa Ana winds alone.
    FYI.
    Id love to get 10 for my home at Osh Hardware, Loews, Home Depot etc.
    Mass produce this
    For Home & Commercial Use.

    • Kenji says:

      No. Just home use. If they were for commercial use, they'd go up a good 300-400% in price. Do you have any idea how much you are overcharged for things like this anyway?

  • Mount this near a medium to heavy wind area for Max use.
    & make blades Visible for PM eve windstorms or CA Santa Ana winds alone.
    FYI.
    Id love to get 10 for my home at Osh Hardware, Loews, Home Depot etc.
    Mass produce this
    For Home & Commercial Use.

    • Kenji says:

      No. Just home use. If they were for commercial use, they'd go up a good 300-400% in price. Do you have any idea how much you are overcharged for things like this anyway?

  • xeives says:

    If you put it on structure(solar tipical structure) it will work fine.

  • xeives says:

    If you put it on structure(solar tipical structure) it will work fine.

  • Thomas says:

    I agree in a sense that they won’t be as efficient as they could be if there was no wall. However, there is a simple method to fix that, which is to create a honeycomb bracing structure, that is the same dimensions of the turbines, to provide the structural support while allowing wind flow.
    Or, any bracing with opening to allow the wind to pass could work.

  • 岳堂彩 says:

    产品真的非常棒,我能在中国买到吗?

  • Teerawat Rakkamnerd says:

    Can you give me a spec of One Component Wind Power.

  • hostgator says:

    Might be this blog’s greatest piece of writing I have read…

  • Jimmy C says:

    Here’s my two cents: I LIKE IT BECAUSE IT IS A DESIGN. how many of you haters have designed energy saving mechanisms?

  • Manny Umpierre says:

    One doesn’t need to have experience in the wind industry as I have had for the past 14 years, OR have extensive knowledge of the fluid dynamic properties of how the wind works to know this is a stupid idea. People want to believe some crazy stuff out there and I think this might just be the easiest to identify as crazy.

    It never fails to surprise me just how easy it is to have people completely abandon their own common sense when it comes to ideas like this. It is hardly mysterious to understand that wind doesn’t go through walls. You may as well sell square tires for cars.

  • GinoTH says:

    I wanna know 2 things:
    – How much? -> $$
    – May I try it?

Comments are closed.