On Gulls Wings

On Gulls Wings

As a bridge sits above a body of water, so too must it respect and fear such a dangerous yet life-giving mass. Moreno Ratti of Cactus Design understands this and presents thusly a bit of bridge architecture that’s as naturally integrated with the water as the birds that fly above it. This is the “Gulle,” a symbol meant to represent the seagull and harness its winged power to deal with the turbulence whipping against, around, below and on top of the bridge on a day-to-day basis.

0 Designer: Moreno Ratti of Cactus Design

This is Future Living

This is Future Living

The Future Living house is a testament to the will of design. It took twenty six designers (a feat in itself) to create it. Every technologic leap was analyzed to make sure anything proposed was possible by 2050. It’s a paradigm shift in home resource creation and location. Water uses gravity to generate pressure. Energy is harvested from solar and wind apparatuses. Air, water and waste are cleaned using a living bio wall and everything is recycled when possible.

0 Designers: Various

A New Gloriette

A New Gloriette

The rich French. What they can do is extraordinary. Especially when you’re talking about their great tracts of land and the way they’ve had them designed and laid out. In this post, you’ll need to know the term “gloriette.” A gloriette is a structure or building constructed in a garden setting made to work with and compliment the surrounding area. This term “gloriette” comes from 12th century French and means “little glory.” What we’ve got here, designed by the Campaña brothers for Veuve Clicquot, is the “La Gloriette,” a contemporary version of the gloriette done in the playful nature of our modern day design world.

0 Designers: Veuve Clicquot and the Campaña brothers

Designing an Entire Campus

Designing an Entire Campus

That’s what A.M.O.S. Design and A Plus are all about, yes! Designing an entire campus is something I’m sure many architects would dream of. With architecture by A PLUS a.s. Brno and Corian realizations in interiors by AMOS Design s.r.o., Masaryk University Campus was bound to be spectacular! This project spans back over 10 years, being set up and 2000 and the first bit complete in 2005. And now, in 2010, the last parts of this gigantic high-tech building are near completion.

0 Designer: A.M.O.S. DESIGN s.r.o.

From Noodles To Steamed Cakes

From Noodles To Steamed Cakes

I’m always impressed when a designer transforms an existing structure into something new and exciting without obliterating its character. Such is the case with this old Japanese noodle shop converted into a modern steamed cake house for a modest budget of $30,000 US dollars. The original architectural details are intact but it’s amazing what light, paint, flooring, and an expert command of minimalist sensibilities can do. I absolutely love the unfinished woods and how it juxtaposes the stark walls. The result are steamed cakes worthy of art display.

0 Designer: Kazutoyo Yamamoto / Dessence co.ltd

The Ground Explosion

The Ground Explosion

Behold! From the earth underfoot jumps forth a sculpture of epic preportions, with a light in it too! This is a single-house project. There’s only one of these amazing amalgamations. But look, if enough people flip out over it, go nuts over it, break a blood vessel in their forhead for it, maybe it’ll be made on a large scale? I hope so. This is fabulous. What this project consists of is metal triangles embedded into the ground in a grid, a grid with the ability to hold triangles that appear to burst forth from the ground. Two planes pushing against each other.

0 Designers: Raveevarn Choksombatchai (principal), Robbie Crabtree, and Jeremy Steiner of VeeV Design

Concrete Veil and Shade

Concrete Veil and Shade

When it comes to architecture, I feel very much drawn to two things – subtlety, and dominance. The building you’re about to look at is certainly at least one of those. See if you can guess which one. Designed by parisian architect’s office Studio Bellecourt, this fantastic vision is made up of a white concrete veil and 25 MILES of aluminum sun shades.

0 Designer: Studio Bellecour

3 Firms, 3 Visions For The Future Of Los Angeles

3 Firms, 3 Visions For The Future Of Los Angeles

I have a love/hate relationship with the city of Angels. I’ve lived here since 2002 and in that short time have come to accept some of L.A.’s defining qualities. Sure the traffic gets to me, the pollution and the ever looming threat of the “big one” but what will it really be like in 2030? Newsweek has a cool interactive feature offering glimpses called The Future Of Work. Three visions by three firms – Michael Maltzan Architecture, Gensler and cityLAB.

0 Website: The Future Of Work by Newsweek

Beirut's Most Fabulous Wine Bar

Beirut’s Most Fabulous Wine Bar

I don’t generally like to rate a restaurant or bar without having been there to taste their rootbeer, but this looks amazing. This is “Burgundy” wine bar/restaurant, Beirut – Lebanon. Look at those lights! Hanging near wooden beams that slice through a wire mesh covering the ceiling, these light objects are made up of conical tubes filling a hypothetical spherical area. Under the lights, a substructure divided into one area for the bar and another for dining.

0 Designer: .PSLAB Beirut

Large Lovely Shipyard Taiwan

Large Lovely Shipyard Taiwan

This project goes by the title “Shipyard Taiwan.” As you probably have already guessed, it’s a Taiwanese shipyard, one that’s designed, planned, and visualized by Motion Code Blue. Built onto and into an existing u-shaped hall and production building for motor yachts, this project aims to add an office building, green and recreational spaces, and a showroom. And in the vein of near-impossible design requirements the world over, the commissioner asks MCB to give this project “landmark-like characteristics.” It’s sort of like saying “make it godly, please.”

0 Designer: Motion Code Blue

D3's Housing Tomorrow Competition 2010 Top 5

D3′s Housing Tomorrow Competition 2010 Top 5

Who loves houses? Everyone. Everyone loves at least the idea of living inside their very own abode. Thusly, since I think you know that everyone also loved competitions, it’s always a fun time to look at the results of a housing design competition. Here’s one! This one’s held yearly by D3 and is called “Housing Tomorrow.” We’ve got the top five concepts right here, all of them housing, all of them hot, all of them architecture-tastic.

0 Designers: Entrants into D3 Housing Tomorrow 2010

Boxlike Business Interior

Boxlike Business Interior

Welcome to the “Toolbox,” a design interior made for incubating ideas and working in a creative manner efficiently, effectively, and in as lovely an environment as possible. Made specifically to “mediate user plurality and diversity with the coherence of the design concept.” Made of a series of both standard and odd materials such as cork and rubber. It’s all very boxy, as I say.

0 Designer: Caterina Tiazzoldi

Cutting Back the Hills

Cutting Back the Hills

Designers at 24° Studio were given a task to create a structure for a pretty specific area of wetlands, a structure that not only provided passage through and safe space for people to enjoy, but one that did not present a danger to the wetlands now or in the future. The area: wetlands along Old Pacific Highway 101 in San Diego California. The solution: Cut Back Hills.

0 Designers: Fumio Hirakawa and Marina Topunova of 24° Studio