Exit Made Easy

REDesign Exit Door simply repositions the door handle to make it an intuitive and effective design during emergency evacuations. Most of than not, the assumption is that we are going to run through doors. But in user-situation, it could be a physically-challenged person, a child or even a person crawling up to the door, who may find the horizontal door bar difficult to reach. Thus this vertical, elongated handle serves as a fitting re-design.

Designer: Chen Guan-Yuan

    213 Comments

    • Chris says:

      I think two horizontal bars at a central and lower height would work. Kind of a hybrid, taking the concept of being all inclusive with the idea of being able to just fall through the door in a panic.

    • Dan says:

      I've read more comments with "it's a push not a pull" that I needed to. That alone proves that the design is flawed. In panic mode you don't stop to read instructions you go and in the spur of the moment I can get stuck in pulling until I get to a crispy crust.
      Sure the old design isn't 100% full proof but it's way better by a ton of motives:
      – it's hard to push – if you opened the horizontal one you know it's not easy, it's not just the "knob" there are other systems in place that keep the door bouncing back closing. A kid no matter how will have troubles opening both of designs as it's not the bar
      – The "clientele" – they are low enough for small childs to open it, smaller than that shouldn't be alone. Handicapped persons can reach it, don't know how the conclusion was it can't. Being on the floor just have to reach my hand up having a better chance to hit a 2m wide area than a few centimeters in the vertical one.
      – No signals needed. Don't need a manual, or lights, don't really need hands, not even to see, just run and hit that homeboy, we gonna find you.
      Cheers

    • Dan says:

      I've read more comments with “it's a push not a pull” that I needed to. That alone proves that the design is flawed. In panic mode you don't stop to read instructions you go and in the spur of the moment I can get stuck in pulling until I get to a crispy crust.
      Sure the old design isn't 100% full proof but it's way better by a ton of motives:
      – it's hard to push – if you opened the horizontal one you know it's not easy, it's not just the “knob” there are other systems in place that keep the door bouncing back closing. A kid no matter how will have troubles opening both of designs as it's not the bar
      – The “clientele” – they are low enough for small childs to open it, smaller than that shouldn't be alone. Handicapped persons can reach it, don't know how the conclusion was it can't. Being on the floor just have to reach my hand up having a better chance to hit a 2m wide area than a few centimeters in the vertical one.
      – No signals needed. Don't need a manual, or lights, don't really need hands, not even to see, just run and hit that homeboy, we gonna find you.
      Cheers

    • 420LIAM says:

      have you ever thought about a door like that with a pedal for people with no hands?

    • 420LIAM says:

      have you ever thought about a door like that with a pedal for people with no hands?

    • george says:

      a swinging door would be best.

    • george says:

      a swinging door would be best.

    • Truth says:

      nope, he’s wrong. the fact that due to design people will die, neither this design nor the old one can facilitate the new world of danger.

      There are no solutions to any problems and you are congratulating a wiki-idiot.

    • axiom says:

      it’s easier to jam that door with a shorter bar

    • axiom says:

      it’s easier to jam that door with a shorter bar

    • anonymous says:

      its a push bar…
      so this whole argument u are making has nothing to do with this new design but rather defending the old one that is the same as the new one cept it excludes the children/disabled

    • Yoda says:

      Yeah.. like an L shaped or diagonal handle!

    • Cassy says:

      I admit that children and those crawling on the floor may have a problem with standard emergency exit doors, but speaking as a wheelchair bound woman I have no problem reaching the handles. This seems to be a solution to a problem that doesn't exist.

    • Cassy says:

      I admit that children and those crawling on the floor may have a problem with standard emergency exit doors, but speaking as a wheelchair bound woman I have no problem reaching the handles. This seems to be a solution to a problem that doesn't exist.

    • Is someone maufacturing designs like this. We need it, for lod decorated doors where is imposible the horizontal bar. Please give us the informatión.

    • Is someone maufacturing designs like this. We need it, for lod decorated doors where is imposible the horizontal bar. Please give us the informatin.

    • Mack says:

      I don't ever recall having trouble opening a door as a child. Also, people in wheel chairs I'm pretty sure can reach door handles. And if someone is trapped in a fire with a lot of smoke, and is too stupid to hold their breath for 2 second to reach up and open a door, then they deserve to die. I think these things are called "crash rails" in some places for a reason: because it should only take someone to crash into the door for it to open, and doesn't require any dexterity. People would be fumbling around looking for the vertical selection as it is pushed to one side of the door. If its dark, smokey, or whatever, and you don't know which way the door opens, it could be difficult to find the handle.

    • Mack says:

      I don't ever recall having trouble opening a door as a child. Also, people in wheel chairs I'm pretty sure can reach door handles. And if someone is trapped in a fire with a lot of smoke, and is too stupid to hold their breath for 2 second to reach up and open a door, then they deserve to die. I think these things are called “crash rails” in some places for a reason: because it should only take someone to crash into the door for it to open, and doesn't require any dexterity. People would be fumbling around looking for the vertical selection as it is pushed to one side of the door. If its dark, smokey, or whatever, and you don't know which way the door opens, it could be difficult to find the handle.

    • avisioncame says:

      Good design. But come on, the disabled are not that low!

    • avisioncame says:

      Good design. But come on, the disabled are not that low!

    • oy oy says:

      I'm not sure how good of an answer this design is, but I like it. Mostly for the fact that it is obviously an exit door and not just a regular one…There's been numerous occasions where I almost use an emergence door by accident and set all the alarms and everything off. Emergency exits should look and function as just that.

      All that being said, I like the concept of both types of handles being utilized, like a rotated "L".
      L"

    • oy oy says:

      I'm not sure how good of an answer this design is, but I like it. Mostly for the fact that it is obviously an exit door and not just a regular one…There's been numerous occasions where I almost use an emergence door by accident and set all the alarms and everything off. Emergency exits should look and function as just that.

      All that being said, I like the concept of both types of handles being utilized, like a rotated “L”.
      L”

    • Simple says:

      this redesign is just outstanding and superb… amazing work…

    • Simple says:

      this redesign is just outstanding and superb… amazing work…

    • Jamie says:

      Uhm yea, try a scale drawing. My 2 year old nephew can reach normal door handles if he tries. The typical bar is what 3-3.5 ft from the ground? The knees on a normal wheelchair sit at at least 2 ft off the ground, so there's really no trouble there either. Also, if a person can't stand to open the door they probably don't have the energy to crawl out of it either. While I understand the premise I don't think anyone has been trapped in a burning building because they couldn't use the horizontal bar…

    • Jamie says:

      Uhm yea, try a scale drawing. My 2 year old nephew can reach normal door handles if he tries. The typical bar is what 3-3.5 ft from the ground? The knees on a normal wheelchair sit at at least 2 ft off the ground, so there's really no trouble there either. Also, if a person can't stand to open the door they probably don't have the energy to crawl out of it either. While I understand the premise I don't think anyone has been trapped in a burning building because they couldn't use the horizontal bar…

    • Layne says:

      My question is does it push or pull?

    • Layne says:

      My question is does it push or pull?

    • matt says:

      it is a push bar. most of you are talking about children opening this door if they can reach the horizontal bar the they should be with an adult especially in the case of a emergency. but I do like the Idea of having the vertical and horizontal bar together .

    • Jim says:

      In the majority of facilities it is best to just leave the door unlatched while people present – no handles needed. The best solution for an occupied building would be to put a push plate over the lower portion of the door that would operate a release if pushed from any height or angle. One problem overlooked is that in a smoke filled room in a panic situation you have a hard time even location the door especially if you add alarms going off. I believe there should be an unique audible signal form the door location. I realize this would not help the hearing imparied but the blind folks would be a big winner.

    • Jim says:

      In the majority of facilities it is best to just leave the door unlatched while people present – no handles needed. The best solution for an occupied building would be to put a push plate over the lower portion of the door that would operate a release if pushed from any height or angle. One problem overlooked is that in a smoke filled room in a panic situation you have a hard time even location the door especially if you add alarms going off. I believe there should be an unique audible signal form the door location. I realize this would not help the hearing imparied but the blind folks would be a big winner.

    • Nuno Marques says:

      I don’t necessarily agree with your point of view. I am not saying it’s wrong though. But having witnessed first hand what happens during a fire situation and the very unfortunate result, I must say this design would have prevented a situation where a kid, separated from his parent, died because he was trapped in a fire and couldn’t reach the handle. He died right next to the door, stains of blood found on the rim, he tried to claw his way out :( It makes me sick just to think what happened. A design like this could have saved a life. And to me that is worth everything.

      Why not implement a solution with both horizontal and vertical bars? Not that hard. Or at least a second lower bar as you suggested. As it stands, I think this a perfect example of how we still don’t take everyone into account when it comes to basic safety.

      As for the rest, most companies I know where fire risks are great are one level operations. No stairs to contend with. Many shopping malls too. Not to mention our local super and hyper markets.

    • I am always investigating online for tips that can benefit me. Thanks http://www.yankodesign.com

    • Pingback: A Fair Warning
    • KEK says:

      If that’s all we are trying to accomplish, then why not make a pushable door panel that encompasses the size of the door. That way, when you pushed the door at a certain speed, regardless of your height or ability, the door would open.

      Although the real problem with fire doors is that they are heavy and differently-able people are disadvantaged in those settings as well. The weight of the fire door, I think, allows the door to swing back and lock the fire inside without the user having to remember.

    • I’m now not positive the place you’re getting your info, however great topic.
      I must spend a while learning more or figuring out more. Thank you
      for magnificent info I used to be in search of this information for my mission.

    • May I just say what a comfort to find an individual who
      really understands what they are discussing over the internet.
      You actually know how to bring an issue to light and make it important.
      More people really need tto look at this and understand
      this side of your story. It’s surprising you’re not
      more popular given that you definitely possess the gift.

    • There’s certainly a lot to find out about this issue.
      I like all of the points you’ve made.

    • It’s going to be end of mine day, except before
      finish I am reading this impressive post to increase
      my experience.

    • Very quickly this web site will be famous among
      all blog viewers, due to it’s good articles

    • Thanks to my father who stated to me about this blog, this
      blog is truly awesome.

    • Hello colleagues, its enormous post regarding teachingand fully defined, keep it up all the time.

    • Quality posts is the important to interest the people to visit the site, that’s what this website is providing.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

    You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>