iReach

I have a confession; I realize I make far too many movie references in my posts for the beautiful concept designs we receive here at Yanko. The reason to me is clear, so many times in our modern world, the creative minds in the movie industry spark our imaginations and inspire us to shape our realities. Take for example the now iconic “Startac” phone from Motorola, inspired by the communicators of the old Star Trek series. Or how about the “AIRFLITE” by KINZO lighting originally designed by Sir Ken Adams for the movie Dr. Stragelove. That lamp was so part of our memories that former president Ronald Reagan actually asked where it was when first shown the actual Pentagon War Room.

Which brings me to our latest submission. Designer C. Darius Delaunay-Driquert has dreamed up a more utopian society where amputees are not bound by the limitations of their handicap, but enhanced by them through bionic prosthetics. The “METIS” connects to the human nervous system and gives an amputee a full 360˚ range of motion, as well as access to virtual dimensions via integrated 3G and Wifi. Now before you jump to the any negative thoughts of how silly a WiFi enabled bionic arm may be, keep in mind that the designer is simply proposing we dream of next step enhancements to the handicapped, instead of simply playing catch up with our current body design.

Designer: C. Darius Delaunay-Driquert

17 Comments

  • Nancy Liu says:

    The word fond for illustration here should choose Times New Roman stardard fond style for better reading, the fond style has chosen here is too cursive to read. Cursive fond style or any other style of word fond is for designing purpose, any fond style for illustration should consider reading for understanding purpose.

    Human is working hard to design anything to proceed God.

  • Nancy Liu says:

    The word fond for illustration here should choose Times New Roman stardard fond style for better reading, the fond style has chosen here is too cursive to read. Cursive fond style or any other style of word fond is for designing purpose, any fond style for illustration should consider reading for understanding purpose.

    Human is working hard to design anything to proceed God.

  • Danny D says:

    I can imagine trying to pick something up with that hand, that shiny polished plastic hand. I would have to deathgrip anything I pick up as to not break it (and break it as a result) or risk it falling through those slippery fingers.

    Beautiful design is one thing. An arm is a functional tool. It's design should first be thought of as functional. I would put this arm of yours on display for all to look at as I couldn't use it.

    • That's a very valid point, Danny, but it is currently just an illustration and a most versatile looking one at that. I am sure such considerations will be taken into account at practical stages.

  • Danny D says:

    I can imagine trying to pick something up with that hand, that shiny polished plastic hand. I would have to deathgrip anything I pick up as to not break it (and break it as a result) or risk it falling through those slippery fingers.

    Beautiful design is one thing. An arm is a functional tool. It's design should first be thought of as functional. I would put this arm of yours on display for all to look at as I couldn't use it.

    • That's a very valid point, Danny, but it is currently just an illustration and a most versatile looking one at that. I am sure such considerations will be taken into account at practical stages.

  • Pennpenn says:

    Ohhh, shiny… Well, maybe a bit too shiny. However, I'd hazard a guess that this would be the prototype or showing off peice, and that the actually article would have some gripping surfaces on the hand at least.

  • Pennpenn says:

    Ohhh, shiny… Well, maybe a bit too shiny. However, I'd hazard a guess that this would be the prototype or showing off peice, and that the actually article would have some gripping surfaces on the hand at least.

  • @Ian_TWL says:

    A little bit of white silicone on the gripping areas should make grip a non-issue without standing out like a sore thumb, if you'll pardon the pun.

  • @Ian_TWL says:

    A little bit of white silicone on the gripping areas should make grip a non-issue without standing out like a sore thumb, if you'll pardon the pun.

  • Matthias says:

    Was the author aware of what he was doing? Did he check up with amputees and asked them what they want and how they feel? I have real doubts that they would accept a “tool” like this for so many points – one beeing that they dont want to screw tools on themselves, but rather live their life like everyone else with normal limbs. Making the prothesis superfuturistic Robogadgets does not help in that matter.

    A good prothesis is invisible to the wearer and his surrounding and not an opportunity to transform your body into a swiss army-knife.

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