Makes Me Want A Salad

It’s so simple yet effective. I love the Hands On Salad Bowl, winner of a 2010 Red Dot Award. A pair of serving sporks are integrated into the bowl blending smoothly into the design. There’s a unique sculptural element to it and hey, it’s seriously fun to look at. The entire thing is made of melamine so easy care is the name of the game. Joseph Joseph is becoming quite the little hot spot for interesting home product design lately.


Designer: Pengelly Design for Joseph Joseph

Hands On Salad Bowl With Integrated Servers by Pengelly Design for Joseph Joseph

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28 Comments

  • Designers still intentionally use melamine in food products? There’s big problems with that material. Just do a quick search for melamine toxicity to see too much information on the topic.

    Any way you can contact the designer to tell them to think about other materials?

    Thanks, Ian

    • Yuuta says:

      I suggest you do some research first before fear mongering.

      As long as you aren’t stupidly trying to heat the plastic or subject it to contact with liquids hot enough to scald skin melamine wares are safe and inert. Melamine is also one of the plastics that are more able to withstand heat so it would take some effort to damage it enough to pose health risks.

      This is a salad bowl. Unless you’re going to use it for some other questionable use, I don’t see a problem with using lightweight melamine in its construction.

      • Todd says:

        Glass is inert making it a good choice for food, will look better and stay looking better longer, and products made from plastic tend to be junkie overall. Also might the scrapping that occurs when you toss a salad scrape the melamine and end up on the salad? Kitchen and dining items should be made from wood, metal, glass, or ceramic.

        • Yuuta says:

          Different materials target different purposes. As far as good inert materials there are certainly a quite a few more desirable than plastics. But for the purpose of this salad bowl with built in serving tools some materials don’t work as well.

          The appeal of this bowl is that it is 1)easy to clean 2)lightweight 3)includes built in serving tools and 4)possibly attractive and fun colours.

          Glass is ruled out as it would be fairly weighty and extra hard to incorporate the built in tools. Metal would be more difficult to than plastic to work with and end up costing more to make;the bowl is actually quite thick. Wood would be a good alternative to the melamine as it is also lightweight and easy to mold(carve in this case), however the drawback is that the wood would need to be finished with chemical polish to give the wood a better feel and to prevent absorption.

          I don’t know why you’d toss salad so vigorously that you’d end up scraping plastic bits off or badly wear it down(well made melamine wares are actually more durable than you’d think) but could the same not be said for wood as well?

  • that is great!!!!!!!! i can never find the serving tools when im looking for them !!!!!

    • reality says:

      gimmick for the retard generation

      • TBC says:

        In saying this you are ignoring the genesis of home appliances. They all started as silly gimmicks. There used to be toaster parties, for god's sake. Can you imagine that? A big party would be thrown, and people would come over and eat toast.

        Frankly, that sounds a whole helluva lot more "retarded" than a design which incorporates a utensil.
        I'm sure you think sporks are for invalids and homeless people?

        • TLB says:

          Actually it is a pretty accurate comment. A polite way of saying “crap”. Also for the record I keep two metal sporks in my bag at all times as not to use or waste plasticware at delis.

      • TBC says:

        In saying this you are ignoring the genesis of home appliances. They all started as silly gimmicks. There used to be toaster parties, for god's sake. Can you imagine that? A big party would be thrown, and people would come over and eat toast.

        Frankly, that sounds a whole helluva lot more “retarded” than a design which incorporates a utensil.
        I'm sure you think sporks are for invalids and homeless people?

  • Thomas says:

    Great bowl …love to eat my Mandys Express salads in it.

  • fork you says:

    looks really dumb, has parts that will get disconnected or lost from it, leaving you with a worthless bowl that spills anything but salad everywhere.

    What’s the point of designing something that is really, fundamentally, redundant?

  • fork you says:

    looks really dumb, has parts that will get disconnected or lost from it, leaving you with a worthless bowl that spills anything but salad everywhere.

    What’s the point of designing something that is really, fundamentally, redundant?

  • TLB says:

    Actually it is a pretty accurate comment. A polite way of saying “crap”. Also for the record I keep two metal sporks in my bag at all times as not to use or waste plasticware at delis.

  • Matt says:

    Another design that answers a question no one asked. Not trying to be a jerk, just being honest. I have bowls. I have forks. I don’t need or want this. Try again.

  • Matt says:

    Another design that answers a question no one asked. Not trying to be a jerk, just being honest. I have bowls. I have forks. I don’t need or want this. Try again.

  • lone vagabond says:

    I would buy this in a heartbeat if only it came with a lid attachment!

  • lone vagabond says:

    I would buy this in a heartbeat if only it came with a lid attachment!

  • Matt says:

    Do the people who write comments here live in the stone age: " I have a bowl and two forks etc"?

    Surely, design is about finding and creating elegance or form or attractive ornateness in everyday or purposely created objects, not a textbook definition, but inthe right area.

    So if you just want to eat your food out of a soup bowl in front of the tv with a spoon or your fingers, go ahead no-one is stopping you, but why comment on a design blog?

    My bets are that these people are from the USA and so presumably think that meals and drinks come in buckets and that great design is a man dressed as Mickey Mouse. Just a hunch, but for something to be "good design" does it need to have dollar sign on, or be pointing to an oil well, or be made by an insipid global corporation that thinks that culture is its produce?

    I think that it's a fun bowl that neatly stacks the salad tongs with it. The tongs have funky curves and it looks pretty cute, and I might get one. Of couse people are welcome to eat some leaves straight out of the ground or perhap off a rock with a rabbit bone kept in the beard for those purposes. However I have lost one salad tong and could do with a new bowl too, so whilst the thought of donning animal skin is appealing for a fancy dress party, I'll leave it out for the moment.

    Apologies for mixing stone age and "US culture" allusions together but I think tere may be a connection; Fred Flinstone?

    On another point though, if mellamine does produce toxics at temperatures the skin scalds at then I guess it's dishwasher, but not boiling water safe and that is an important point may be.

  • Matt says:

    Do the people who write comments here live in the stone age: ” I have a bowl and two forks etc”?

    Surely, design is about finding and creating elegance or form or attractive ornateness in everyday or purposely created objects, not a textbook definition, but inthe right area.

    So if you just want to eat your food out of a soup bowl in front of the tv with a spoon or your fingers, go ahead no-one is stopping you, but why comment on a design blog?

    My bets are that these people are from the USA and so presumably think that meals and drinks come in buckets and that great design is a man dressed as Mickey Mouse. Just a hunch, but for something to be “good design” does it need to have dollar sign on, or be pointing to an oil well, or be made by an insipid global corporation that thinks that culture is its produce?

    I think that it's a fun bowl that neatly stacks the salad tongs with it. The tongs have funky curves and it looks pretty cute, and I might get one. Of couse people are welcome to eat some leaves straight out of the ground or perhap off a rock with a rabbit bone kept in the beard for those purposes. However I have lost one salad tong and could do with a new bowl too, so whilst the thought of donning animal skin is appealing for a fancy dress party, I'll leave it out for the moment.

    Apologies for mixing stone age and “US culture” allusions together but I think tere may be a connection; Fred Flinstone?

    On another point though, if mellamine does produce toxics at temperatures the skin scalds at then I guess it's dishwasher, but not boiling water safe and that is an important point may be.

  • Alex says:

    Ordinarily I find a lot of the design projects on Yanko to be interesting but poorly thought out in regards to practicality or engineering potential ( I'm referring to things like phones made entirely of glass or watches that use a complicated series of dots to tell time here.) that while cool looking, have absolutely no chance of being useful or practical. This design, while it does have a few problems and questions that deserves addressing like potential to lose parts or asking could there be another material that might fit the bill better, would actually be something that can be manufactured, will hold up to some level of usage. Will it replace a bowl and two forks? Probably not. Would it still sell? Yes.

    Chances are good the designer did address those things and came up with what they decided the best solution was. Someone else will have a different or better idea occasionally.

    As for the US=Fred Flintstones comment; might I remind you that the Flintstones were remarkably advanced for a bunch of cavemen? That was a completely unnecessary issue to bring up your own problems with what you think the US is. Calling those people who take issue with the design idiots is at best making yourself look bad. People tend to stick with what they've been using for a while for a reason. It works. And until you can show that your method is better, calling them idiots is just a good way of screwing yourself out potential clients, employers and customers. I say this for the benefit of everyone who reads this, not just Matt there. Too many people forget that they're designing to what the end customer wants.

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