Dune Formation Furnitures

Another day, another step towards global domination for the ubiquitous creative powerhouse that is Zaha Hadid. This time she’s presenting a new collection of works, Dune Formations, recently unveiled at the Venice Biennale and now showing at London’s David Gill Galleries.

We’ve always been big fans of Zaha’s furniture design and Dune Formations merely serve to cement the high regard in which we hold her as a product designer in her own right, not merely an architect capable of turning her hand to the odd chair. An organic ensemble of shelving, tables, benches and sculptural display pieces inspired by the natural forms of their sandy namesakes, Dune Formations employ the same fluid curves and suggestion of undulating motion that are characteristic of her recent creative output.

Defying the established modes of predominately using just vertical and horizontal planes for furniture, Zaha Hadid has created each piece with a distinctly sculptural approach adding an overall 3-dimensional feel to the range. Advanced 3-D modelling techniques and innovative materials were used to translate the designs from drawings into furniture with a highly polished dichromatic finish. The collection is centred around the Dune Tree, more sculptural object than utilisable furniture piece, finished in orange and gold, reminiscent of a sand landscape at sunset.

Designer: Zaha Hadid & Patrik Schumacher

11 Comments

  • Anonymus says:

    There’s barely anything worth of praise in Zaha’s designs. IMHO, the essence of design is creating logic of how stuff are put together and how they work. In that sense the formal solution of a design must directly correspond to its logic for the design to be coherent. That can of course also include pure aesthetic, symbolistic or other not purely functional (in the modernistic manner) aspects, if that is expected of a design. But in Zaha’s case it’s always been more or less plain sculpturing with a pretence of doing design or architecture. If only the sculptures she makes would have some artistic value, but instead they only tell of shallow fascination with meaningless form. Just plain irresponsible kitsch.

    • Ot2designer says:

      Wow, thats a bit harsh. I happen to love her experiemental language of form.

    • Payback says:

      If you are going to be a critic, you should make sure your language skills and grammar are correct so you don’t come off looking like a blabbering idiot. You will not be taken seriously.

      “the essence of design is creating logic of how stuff are put together and how they work.”

      the essence of design is creating logic of how “stuff”(using the term “stuff” just does not translate in the outside world, and it makes you look like a blabbering idiot) “are” (if you are going to use the term “stuff” it would be a singular “is” not “are” and followed up with “they work” should be “it works”.

      You said:
      “That can of course also include pure aesthetic, symbolistic or other not purely functional (in the modernistic manner) aspects, if that is expected of a design.” This is not a sentence. There are so many things wrong here I do not know where to begin. Once again, you come off as a blabbering idiot. You will not be taken seriously.

      Here is some help on your statement:
      This essence of design can include aesthetic(s) (you are talking about more than one thing here. Use the correct terminology. It is plural.), symbolism (symbolistic is an adjective and is incorrect), or other aspects of non-functional design. (what you said did not make any sense).

      You then go on to say:
      “But in Zaha’s case it’s always been more or less plain sculpturing with a pretence of doing design or architecture. If only the sculptures she makes would have some artistic value, but instead they only tell of shallow fascination with meaningless form. Just plain irresponsible kitsch.”

      Here is some help on your statement:
      (But in Zaha’s case) – Come on buddy, the first lesson we learned in grade school after our times tables was to NEVER begin a sentence with “BUT”. It is just wrong. Also, using the word “sculpturing” lets us, as the reader, in on your blabbering idotic & uneducated history. You have obviously no grasp on fine art, much less modern design, and you need to go back to grade school to learn a bit about the english language and grammar. Don’t worry, you’ve got a stubborn, half-empty glass opinion, you will go far.

      Try this:
      In Zaha’s methods of design, she has used the technique of sculpting with a pretence of creating design or architecture.

      You then go on to say:

      “If only the sculptures she makes would have some artistic value, but instead they only tell of shallow fascination with meaningless form. Just plain irresponsible kitsch.”

      Here you have a conjunction, or two ideas combined into one sentence. You begin your critical sentence with “If only”. This goes along with the no-no’s of the previous comment regarding begining a sentence with “But…” It is just wrong and makes you look like a blabbering idiot. You will not be taken seriously.

      Try this:

      I believe that Zaha’s sculptures do not have any artistic value (which is contrary to collectors, if you keep up with today’s design news:
      12/10/2007
      “Two works by Hadid, priced from $39,000 up, were sold on opening night. One was a sleek, polished fiberglass wall shelf painted gold, in an edition of eight. Part of the Dune Formations series, it was described as an “organic ensemble of furniture elements” made using 3D-modeling techniques.”).

      You could go on to finish up your blabbering by saying:
      Zaha’s work makes me believe that she has a shallow fascination with meaningless form. (again, beauty is in the eye of the beholder, which in this case is a blabbering idiot)

      You then go on to finish it up with the worst incomplete sentence I have ever seen:
      “Just plain irresponsible kitsch”

      Try this:
      “I am a blabbering idiot. I have no concept of art or design. I believe that my dogshit opinion is the only opinion out there. I have no idea how to conjugate verbs, write complete sentences, and/or scribe in the correct tense. I am a blabbering idiot, you should not take me seriously. I am voicing my opinion, yet I will stay anonymous and disappear into my little hole of meaningless existance. I will come out again to judge and no one will listen to me because I am a jealous punk. I thrive on pulling others down. My work sucks and I live in the shadows of those who are great. I am dirt.”

      • Jason says:

        We always welcome and appreciate your comments, but please, refute the comment, not the commenter. :)

      • dizzy says:

        rofl. its cute how you seem to think anyone cares enough to read through all of that. both of you are taking this too seriously, and its pretty obvious that you both have a grossly inflated sense of self. its really pretty pathetic.
        protip: you both need to eat a fat dose of acid and kill your egos asap.

  • Nickolas Titkov says:

    BTW, further colour choices will include green-black and purple, which is Hadid’s signature colour.

  • Sabina says:

    City majors nowadays often invest on an internationally known architect to create a significant monument for their rather small and unknown city. Every cent is spent on the architect’s bill, even if the city is in need of other important services. Zaha Hadid is one of those modern architects with a well-known name that gobernors are dying to hire and pay them a fortune. In order to design her Millenium bridge, in Zaragoza (Spain), she visited the city for about half a day… and that’s after she had designed the whole thing (her and her computer programs). That’s modern architecture: a famous architect with very little interest for the enviroment and the people that is going to “enjoy” and pay their creations. A big name, and a big fortune behind, who cares for anything else.

  • Soto says:

    What Zaha represents is soul! Its beyond art and form. It is a vision, a vision of what is acheivable by the human spirit and mind! Clearly not all people can appreciate this, like most people cannot appreciate nor comprehend the beauty of mathematics!
    If the top reviewer had ever been/seen the sand dunes of Morrocco or the Middel East, he would have not made such a senseless critique!
    To me it recaps the scenario of being in the open desert again, and imagining what it would have been like if somone had sculpted the sand dunes with there hands.

  • kenneth says:

    please am from the eastern part of nigeria and am into interiors and furnitures.i saw your works and i must say it is the next level.how about us doing business.
    thank u very much.

  • tom says:

    i agree with ‘poster1′ in essense he’s right. hardly furniture i would ever enjoy sitting on. dont get me wrong theres always something cool about seeing a weird and wonderfuil form…but calling it furniture is a little strong for me.

    if this were a truly credible design technique we would all be laughing…do a quick sketch then pick a product that it looks most like a WHAM design finished!

    This type of design if for the ‘greats’ who have luckily found themselves in a posistion where they can get away with it!!! and yes i am sporting green eyes!

    the best way to take this stuff is to get along to see it in the flesh..sit back and enjoy!

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